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A very kind Nurse


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#1    markdohle

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:11 PM

I think this belongs here, please moderator let me know it this kind of thing belongs elsewhere.  Peace Mark

A very kind Nurse


On my second night at the VA, the nurse on duty was one I had not met before.  I could not sleep, nor could I lie down flat on my bed.  Lying down brought some trouble with my breathing, which then progressed to pain in my chest area.  Along with my ‘ice pick’ headache, sleep was pretty much impossible.  She introduced herself as Sarah (not her real name) and that she was going to be our nurse that night.  The first thing I noticed about her was the tonality of her voice, it seemed to soothe and reduce anxiety.  She asked how I was doing and I told her of my pain.  She asked me what level; I responded that it was between an 8 or 9.  The last nurse on duty would only give me one Tylenol every six hours, which not enough deal with the pain.  It would mute it for about an hour and then start to build up.  Inside I was frightened, which humiliated me and made me angry.  Having pain and feeling that relief was being withheld for no reason also made me feel frantic and scared.  She looked at me; left the room soon returned and gave me two Tylenol.  She communicated to me that she could see that I was in a lot of pain, and since it was an over the counter medicine, she could not refuse me.  I was so thankful.  Eugene my roommate needed a lot of visits so I was awake for the rest of the night.  The lessening of the pain was such a blessing that I did not care.  She was very gentle with Eugene and was never out of the room for more than 30 minutes.  It was like she could be in more than one place at a time.  All the nurses there were good and kind, but she was different and touched me in such a way that I still feel it.  Perhaps it was because she actually saw me, listened, empathized and did something about it.  I was not suffering from Tylenol toxicity, so she did the humane thing and gave me pain relief.   Over all the care was good, but I don’t understand why the hesitation in dealing with pain.  They may have their reasons, but what they consisted of was never relayed to me.  The next time I go into the hospital, I will take a bottle of Tylenol.  I don’t abuse it and refuse to be treated as if I do.


#2    Robbie333

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:19 PM

View Postmarkdohle, on 11 April 2012 - 09:11 PM, said:

I think this belongs here, please moderator let me know it this kind of thing belongs elsewhere.  Peace Mark

A very kind Nurse


On my second night at the VA, the nurse on duty was one I had not met before.  I could not sleep, nor could I lie down flat on my bed.  Lying down brought some trouble with my breathing, which then progressed to pain in my chest area.  Along with my 'ice pick' headache, sleep was pretty much impossible.  She introduced herself as Sarah (not her real name) and that she was going to be our nurse that night.  The first thing I noticed about her was the tonality of her voice, it seemed to soothe and reduce anxiety.  She asked how I was doing and I told her of my pain.  She asked me what level; I responded that it was between an 8 or 9.  The last nurse on duty would only give me one Tylenol every six hours, which not enough deal with the pain.  It would mute it for about an hour and then start to build up.  Inside I was frightened, which humiliated me and made me angry.  Having pain and feeling that relief was being withheld for no reason also made me feel frantic and scared.  She looked at me; left the room soon returned and gave me two Tylenol.  She communicated to me that she could see that I was in a lot of pain, and since it was an over the counter medicine, she could not refuse me.  I was so thankful.  Eugene my roommate needed a lot of visits so I was awake for the rest of the night.  The lessening of the pain was such a blessing that I did not care.  She was very gentle with Eugene and was never out of the room for more than 30 minutes.  It was like she could be in more than one place at a time.  All the nurses there were good and kind, but she was different and touched me in such a way that I still feel it.  Perhaps it was because she actually saw me, listened, empathized and did something about it.  I was not suffering from Tylenol toxicity, so she did the humane thing and gave me pain relief.   Over all the care was good, but I don't understand why the hesitation in dealing with pain.  They may have their reasons, but what they consisted of was never relayed to me.  The next time I go into the hospital, I will take a bottle of Tylenol.  I don't abuse it and refuse to be treated as if I do.

         Don't berate her Mark. I work in an ER and it depends on the Doc or CRNP in charge of your care. A Tylenol is not bad but they just cannot make these types of calls. Actually, she should have called the Doc and asked if it was okay. I know it sound wrong but it is all about proper procedure. I am glad you got a kind one to attend you. I have met many whom do not belong there. Have a good one and rest.

Robbie James

#3    markdohle

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 10:12 PM

View PostRobbie333, on 11 April 2012 - 09:19 PM, said:

Don't berate her Mark. I work in an ER and it depends on the Doc or CRNP in charge of your care. A Tylenol is not bad but they just cannot make these types of calls. Actually, she should have called the Doc and asked if it was okay. I know it sound wrong but it is all about proper procedure. I am glad you got a kind one to attend you. I have met many whom do not belong there. Have a good one and rest.


I agree there is a system and nurses are part of that.  Yet, it can take three hours after you ask for a pain med, even OTC ones, which I think is wrong, though again, it is the system.  Also it would be helpful if it was explained, the why things take so long.  I will still bring my own tylenol next time my friend.  The nurse did not call the doctor for the tylenol, but I doubt she does it all the time, she just precieved that chonic pain can wear a person down and I had not eaten in almost two days and was at my wits end. It was humbling for me to be in that state, though I did not yell or take my frustraion out on anyone,,,really no ones fault.  I just think some things need to be tweak a bit.  I work with the dying and elderly and we make pain control a 1st priority and hve argued with doctors over this.  We have stopped using some doctors because they showed a lack of empathy.  They meant well and were good doctors, but were useless when it find some relief with chronic pain.

peace and thanks for you comment
Mark


#4    and then

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 11:23 PM

View Postmarkdohle, on 11 April 2012 - 10:12 PM, said:

I agree there is a system and nurses are part of that.  Yet, it can take three hours after you ask for a pain med, even OTC ones, which I think is wrong, though again, it is the system.  Also it would be helpful if it was explained, the why things take so long.  I will still bring my own tylenol next time my friend.  The nurse did not call the doctor for the tylenol, but I doubt she does it all the time, she just precieved that chonic pain can wear a person down and I had not eaten in almost two days and was at my wits end. It was humbling for me to be in that state, though I did not yell or take my frustraion out on anyone,,,really no ones fault.  I just think some things need to be tweak a bit.  I work with the dying and elderly and we make pain control a 1st priority and hve argued with doctors over this.  We have stopped using some doctors because they showed a lack of empathy.  They meant well and were good doctors, but were useless when it find some relief with chronic pain.

peace and thanks for you comment
Mark
Doing x-ray and ct as well as mri for years I'm familiar with the attitudes of Dr.s and nurses about "drug seekers".  Unless the person in question has a record of asking for pain meds chronically and without sufficient reason, I noticed the calls by these "professionals" to be somewhat subjective.  There is no doubt that a large number of addicts do abuse ER's looking for their fix but I frankly would rather err on the side of giving a person in pain some relief than automatically assuming that if they don't come in with broken bones or other obvious signs of trauma they are "faking it".  In their defense many physicians worry about how they administer pain meds due to the DEA and their record keeping.  Even Oncologists and physicians dealing with Hospice patients can be penalized for over prescribing and to me THAT is outrageous.  It is incredibly easy to verify the validity of the use of these meds in a hospice setting.
I was so put off by these kinds of attitudes that I have decided not to leave those decisions in the hands of impersonal and potentially uncaring strangers should I become terminally ill.  My opinion is that many in this field these days are there for the wrong reasons and mercy and compassion are lacking at many levels.  I worked in a VA facility for 5 years and will always be proud that I was able to serve those who served all of us.  They were, by and large, the best group of patients I have ever been involved with.

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#5    Simbi Laveau

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 11:39 PM

Yeah.Nurses have to follow what the doctor has written you can have,in your chart.
They do also worry about people seeking pain meds.
Tylenol ,given the chest pain,also might not be the drug of choice .
There should be some kind of doctor on call during the midnight shift though.
If there ever is a next time(I hope not),ask the nurse ,"can you please ask the doctor,if there's something I can have for this pain?".
And maybe you can have something else,if it's not contraindicated.

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#6    markdohle

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 01:20 PM

View Postand then, on 11 April 2012 - 11:23 PM, said:

Doing x-ray and ct as well as mri for years I'm familiar with the attitudes of Dr.s and nurses about "drug seekers".  Unless the person in question has a record of asking for pain meds chronically and without sufficient reason, I noticed the calls by these "professionals" to be somewhat subjective.  There is no doubt that a large number of addicts do abuse ER's looking for their fix but I frankly would rather err on the side of giving a person in pain some relief than automatically assuming that if they don't come in with broken bones or other obvious signs of trauma they are "faking it".  In their defense many physicians worry about how they administer pain meds due to the DEA and their record keeping.  Even Oncologists and physicians dealing with Hospice patients can be penalized for over prescribing and to me THAT is outrageous.  It is incredibly easy to verify the validity of the use of these meds in a hospice setting.
I was so put off by these kinds of attitudes that I have decided not to leave those decisions in the hands of impersonal and potentially uncaring strangers should I become terminally ill.  My opinion is that many in this field these days are there for the wrong reasons and mercy and compassion are lacking at many levels.  I worked in a VA facility for 5 years and will always be proud that I was able to serve those who served all of us.  They were, by and large, the best group of patients I have ever been involved with.

One of the very cool aspects about VA hospitals is that many of the Nurses are vets and love the men and women they take care of.  When young, I never thought that a connection would be formed with the vets I met.  When in the VA hospital this seems to become more conscious.

I agree, I would rather veer in the dir of relieving suffering.  Even addicts have pain.  I have an addict friend, so I can how it could wear down some professionals who have to deal with them all the time......still each case should be treated as unuque and not everyone painted with one brush stroke.

Peacde
Mark

Edited by markdohle, 12 April 2012 - 01:21 PM.


#7    markdohle

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 01:23 PM

View PostSimbi Laveau, on 11 April 2012 - 11:39 PM, said:

Yeah.Nurses have to follow what the doctor has written you can have,in your chart.
They do also worry about people seeking pain meds.
Tylenol ,given the chest pain,also might not be the drug of choice .
There should be some kind of doctor on call during the midnight shift though.
If there ever is a next time(I hope not),ask the nurse ,"can you please ask the doctor,if there's something I can have for this pain?".
And maybe you can have something else,if it's not contraindicated.

I know it is not simple my friend.  That is why I still have the greatest respect for Doctors and Nurses.  I guess if they would just explain the 'why' of things once in awhile.  

Peace
mark


#8    Taun

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 05:19 PM

It is always possible that in the OP's case, the doctor had already authorized the Nurse to increase the Tylonol dosage if the patient ask her to...

Not saying that is what happened, but it is a possibility...


#9    markdohle

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 08:59 PM

View PostTaun, on 12 April 2012 - 05:19 PM, said:

It is always possible that in the OP's case, the doctor had already authorized the Nurse to increase the Tylonol dosage if the patient ask her to...

Not saying that is what happened, but it is a possibility...

Does not work that way anymmore, though in the past it did.  OTC's were kept on hand, now each dose has to be packed by the pharmacy.  No, she just did it.  I would have never asked a nurse to give me more narcotic's, that would have cost her her job.  Out of four nurses, each very good and compassionate; she was the only one who did it.

Peace
Mark


#10    Robbie333

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:47 PM

View Postmarkdohle, on 11 April 2012 - 10:12 PM, said:

I agree there is a system and nurses are part of that.  Yet, it can take three hours after you ask for a pain med, even OTC ones, which I think is wrong, though again, it is the system.  Also it would be helpful if it was explained, the why things take so long.  I will still bring my own tylenol next time my friend.  The nurse did not call the doctor for the tylenol, but I doubt she does it all the time, she just precieved that chonic pain can wear a person down and I had not eaten in almost two days and was at my wits end. It was humbling for me to be in that state, though I did not yell or take my frustraion out on anyone,,,really no ones fault.  I just think some things need to be tweak a bit.  I work with the dying and elderly and we make pain control a 1st priority and hve argued with doctors over this.  We have stopped using some doctors because they showed a lack of empathy.  They meant well and were good doctors, but were useless when it find some relief with chronic pain.

peace and thanks for you comment
Mark

          I would mention this to your Doc. I can assure you he will take care of it.

Robbie James

#11    markdohle

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:33 PM

View PostRobbie333, on 12 April 2012 - 10:47 PM, said:

I would mention this to your Doc. I can assure you he will take care of it.

The doctor was very nice and yes I need to be more proactive before I go to the hospital my friend.  Thanks for your reading me, always enjoy you comments.

Peace
mark





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