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Maryland puts bounty on 'fish from hell'


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#1    Karlis

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:47 AM

blogs.sites.post-gazette.com said:

The fish are hardy enough to survive up to four days on land, and can migrate up to a quarter mile between bodies of water by wriggling on their fins. National Geographic has dubbed the snakehead “fishzilla,” and it is also frequently referred to as the “fish from hell.” They can grow to more than 2 feet long and have been found in at least seven states. Posted Image Read more...



#2    and then

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:20 AM

They should make it legal to hunt or fish them.  A lot of folks would love to bowhunt critters like this.  I think I've seen video of them if it's the same fish.  They look like cat fish that can "low crawl" on their fins...creepy.

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#3    pallidin

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 11:38 AM

Able to survive up to 4 days on land? Jeeze, that's just creepy.


#4    Rafterman

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 01:31 PM

Those little b******* are showing up more and more and they are deadly to the native ecosystems.  Unfortunately I'm afraid the problem has already grown beyond our ability to control it.  They're in both the Susquehanna and the Potomac in large numbers.

The NatGeo special is really interesting if you happen to catch it.  Apparently one of the entry points is through Asian grocery stores who illegally import them - since they stay alive out of the water, it's quite easy to do - for use in medicinal soups.  They showed up in a pond in CT because a guy got two of them to make the soup and his wife got better before he could make it.  So to appease the Gods or some such nonsense, he released them in this pond.

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#5    conspiracybeliever

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 01:48 PM

http://search.yahoo..../wiki/Channidae

Snakeheads can become invasive species and cause ecological damage because they are top-level predators, meaning they have no natural enemies outside of their native environment. Not only can they breathe atmospheric air, but they can also survive on land for up to four days, provided they are wet, and are known to migrate up to 1/4 mile on wet land to other bodies of water by wriggling with their body and fins. National Geographic has referred to snakeheads as "Fishzilla"[2][3][4] and the National Geographic Channel reports that the "northern snakehead reaches sexual maturity by age 2 or 3. Each spawning-age female can release up to 15,000 eggs at once. Snakeheads can mate as often as five times a year. This means in just two years, a single female can release up to 150,000 eggs." [2]

Wikipedia is pretty interesting and it has pictures. From the above it does look like they would be hard to get under control at this point.


#6    Child of Bast

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 02:59 PM

If they're so invasive, why can't there be open fishing on them year 'round with no limits? According to the Wikipedia article conspiracybeliever provided, they are edible...



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#7    Princess Serenity

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:02 PM

The snakehead is back. I can't believe this. Maybe the  old hunters would come out out of retirement.

Edited by Princess Serenity, 19 April 2012 - 03:02 PM.


#8    Robbie333

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:08 PM

I fish a lot of Bass tournaments in the DC area. I have yet to catch one of these fish but I had a guy come over to our boat and show us one. Wild looking fish and I heard they are very tasty. We are told to kill any we catch and to report our catch on a form to the authorities. I hope they do not hurt our fishery. The Lower Potomoc River is an awsome fishery for Bass.

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#9    Rafterman

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:26 PM

View PostOffeiriad, on 19 April 2012 - 02:59 PM, said:

If they're so invasive, why can't there be open fishing on them year 'round with no limits? According to the Wikipedia article conspiracybeliever provided, they are edible...

From what I know, it's pretty much "kill on sight" anytime you come across one.  I don't know of any enforced seasons for them.

Heck here in NY the DEC wanted to confiscate and kill one a guy had in an indoor aquarium.

All of that said, I'm sure they'd make an awesome game fish and I'd love to catch one at some point.  I just don't want to see our native bass species and other fish decimated in the process.

Edited by Rafterman, 19 April 2012 - 03:27 PM.

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#10    Gromdor

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:05 PM

From what I have read, it is open season on them.  Also from what I have heard, not only are they edible, they are yummy!


#11    Child of Bast

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:51 PM

Well y'all catch 'em and send some down here. Cajuns'll eat anything.

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#12    Ashotep

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 12:05 AM

These fish, killer bees and piranha what's next, oh yea pythons.





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