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Planet X / Nibiru Found?

planet x / nibiru

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#61    Erudite Celt

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 07:42 PM

View Postcormac mac airt, on 21 May 2012 - 07:10 PM, said:

If it wasn't a genuine mass extinction then there really is no reason to bring it up as such. That was, after all, your theory. Right?

cormac
All but a small few percent of reptiles disappeared from the face of the earth. Only the smallest of the mammals survived. The terrestrial earth that previous to the event  was 80% forested became 5-15% forested. Mass extinction as you well know can mean many things. But if another Chicxulub were to hit earth tomorrow I think most people would [those that had survived]  say that the world had ended, that the world had just undergone a mass extinction event. But in a literal sense mass extinction would mean that not even single nanobacteria would survive. But no...my main point was to float the idea that the solar system maybe  visited every 200-250 million years by a full on barrage of space debris, I simply used periodical mass extinction events on earth to support the idea!


#62    shaddow134

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 08:20 PM

View PostErudite Celt, on 21 May 2012 - 07:42 PM, said:

All but a small few percent of reptiles disappeared from the face of the earth. Only the smallest of the mammals survived. The terrestrial earth that previous to the event  was 80% forested became 5-15% forested. Mass extinction as you well know can mean many things. But if another Chicxulub were to hit earth tomorrow I think most people would [those that had survived]  say that the world had ended, that the world had just undergone a mass extinction event. But in a literal sense mass extinction would mean that not even single nanobacteria would survive. But no...my main point was to float the idea that the solar system maybe  visited every 200-250 million years by a full on barrage of space debris, I simply used periodical mass extinction events on earth to support the idea!

Only 35% of animal species have to die to call it a mass extinction.



The five largest mass extinctions in Earth's history occurred during:
The late Ordovician period (about 438 million years ago) - 100 families extinct - more than half of the bryozoan and brachiopod species extinct.
The late Devonian (about 360 mya) - 30% of animal families extinct.
At the end of the Permian period (about 245 mya) - Trilobites go extinct. 50% of all animal families, 95% of all marine species, and many trees die out.
The late Triassic (208 mya) - 35% of all animal families die out. Most early dinosaur families went extinct, and most synapsids died out (except for the mammals).
At the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary (about 65 mya) - about half of all life forms died out, including the dinosaurs , pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, ammonites, many families of fishes, clams, snails, sponges, sea urchins, and many others.

Not all these events match up with meteor Impacts and your 200-250 million year timing is wrong..

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#63    cormac mac airt

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 08:38 PM

View Postshaddow134, on 21 May 2012 - 08:20 PM, said:

Only 35% of animal species have to die to call it a mass extinction.



The five largest mass extinctions in Earth's history occurred during:
The late Ordovician period (about 438 million years ago) - 100 families extinct - more than half of the bryozoan and brachiopod species extinct.
The late Devonian (about 360 mya) - 30% of animal families extinct.
At the end of the Permian period (about 245 mya) - Trilobites go extinct. 50% of all animal families, 95% of all marine species, and many trees die out.
The late Triassic (208 mya) - 35% of all animal families die out. Most early dinosaur families went extinct, and most synapsids died out (except for the mammals).
At the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary (about 65 mya) - about half of all life forms died out, including the dinosaurs , pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, ammonites, many families of fishes, clams, snails, sponges, sea urchins, and many others.

Not all these events match up with meteor Impacts and your 200-250 million year timing is wrong..

So we have around 48 million, 115 million, 37 million and 143 million years between each. Yep, definitely not 200 - 250 million years.

cormac

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#64    Lightingbird

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 02:08 PM

I have had this discussion with a few people and despite all of the possibly, I just don't see a planet hurling through our solar system on a collision with earth.  Then on top of that, no one has seen it? Didn't this whole theory come from a book or something?


#65    Kratology

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 01:46 AM

It's a space station


#66    DBunker

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 04:14 PM

Dont you just love it when the some Planet X slingers start talking about Remote Viewing when we ask for evidence of their claims. :clap:

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#67    JesseCuster

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 06:55 PM

View PostErudite Celt, on 21 May 2012 - 11:53 AM, said:

The fact is that these 200 million year old cycles arrive with the precision of a Swiss watch which implies a 200-250 million year orbit!
Where are you getting your information from?

1) If there is a 50 million uncertainty (200-250 million years) in the cycles you are proposing, then that's a 20% margin of error. You have a very odd idea of how accurate Swiss watches are if they can be fast or slow by 20%, imagine a watch that when you wound it, could be 5 hours off 24 hours later.  Swiss precision? I don't think so.
2) Can you list the events that you are talking about that have happened with the precision of a Swiss watch?

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