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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#2311    Apol

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:39 PM

View PostApol, on 23 January 2013 - 04:10 AM, said:

Regarding Kälta - have you never wondered where Kälta's burgh KÄLTA.S BURCH - later renamed KÊREN.ÄK and KÊREN.HERNE was situated? The OLB says it was in BERCH.LAND, which most authors agree is in the area of Scotland, though still even Alewyn points to CARNAC in Brittany...

Thank you - that's indeed an interesting observation. I have another theory, though. Here it is:
It is written: "...thousands of Gola have went to North Brittanja. A short time ago the uppermost of the Golum was established at the burgh which is called Kêrenäk – which means ‘corner’, from where he gave his commands to all the other Gola. All their gold was also brought together there. Kêrenherne, or Kêrenäk, is a stone burgh which before belonged to Kälta,"
When Âskar had overpowered the Phoenician priests, the Dênamarkers became green with envy, and they would cross the sea to catch him. This indicates that we should search for Kälta's former burgh on the east coast of Great Britain. There exists an age-old fortification on the hilltops of Eildon Hill near Melrose, just south of today's Scottish border. At these heights - alongside the River Tweed - the largest settlement of the Scottish Bronze Age is situated. Upon the more than 300 horizontal foundations that are cut into the hillside, between 3,000 and 6,000 people had their residences; and one knows that there was activity in the place as far back in time as around 1000 BC. The ramparts have been built and rebuilt in three stages - the last time by the Romans in the 1st century BC. The Romans named the hillfort Trimontium - from Eildon Hill's three mountain peaks.
The text says that Âskar took two islands as shelter for his ships. There exist very few islands on the east coast of Great Britain, but just 25 kms south of where River Tweed empties into the North Sea, we have the Farne Islands - which certainly also must have been the only ilands that suited for Âskar's purpose. The sea kings wanted small islands just outside the coast as safe harbours for their ships - especially islands with deep bays, but also two islands situated beside each other, between which the fleet could lay sheltered from wind and waves. This was the reason why Âskar chose two islands. If the Farne Islands was the place, I would believe that he occupied the innermost of the island groups, as it looks like they must have been the most suitable. He may have sailed his fleet into the creek formed by the Inner Farne and West Wideopen with Knoxes Reef. The sandbanks between these islands must have been suitable for landing.

'Farne' is usually explained as being a gaelic-scotch name derived from ærn ('house') or fearn ('distant'). Yet, there lies also a Farne island separated alongside the coast, a little farther northwest. This tidal island, which at ebb-tide is linked to land, is called Lindisfarne or Lindesfarne. It is famous for its monastery, and from the fact that the Vikings attacked it in AD 793 and thus initiated the Viking Age. This would have been a natural site for the first stopping of intruders to Eildon Hill, as well as for the defence of the coastline.
The burgh was not formed like a ringwallburgh - according to the Frisian tradition of how a burgh should look like. That was not in Kälta's interest - to her the protection of her territory was the essential, which she could do in the same way as the Gola.
One do not know the background of the name Lindisfarne; though Anthony D. Mills has forwarded a theory that it should mean 'the island of the travellers from Lindsey'.
I think the background of the name has a slightly different history. Kälta's burgh was called Kêren.äk – in Frisian they called it Kêren.herne. When Âskar conquered the burgh he renamed it Linda.s.herne in memory of Adela Oera Linda. After the Magy was killed, several sites were named from her - first and foremost Lindas.nose and Lindas.burch.Âskar's renaming of Kêren.herne was one of his several attempts to cotton up to the Adelings.


Edited by Apol, 23 January 2013 - 02:46 PM.


#2312    Abramelin

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:42 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 23 January 2013 - 02:19 PM, said:

Only Tyrians should be the true incomers of the story about arriving from the Red Sea, not the whole of Canaan. People from Sidon were there very early and do not have to be the Phoenicians who arrived from the Red Sea.

The OLB touches on this - they arrive at Tyre, settle there - giving Tyrians only a Frisian heritage.

Even though the Tyrians might really be from the Red Sea, the OLB has included the foundation of Tyre as an event by them.

When Tyre, Sidon and the coastal area was established as traders I'd say it then became known as Phoenicia and all these coastal people were now Phoenicians.

I quoted Herodotus in my former post (the Israeli professor), and here's another quote:

The Greek researcher Herodotus of Halicarnassus visited Tyre in the mid-fifth century BCE. In Histories 2.44, he offers a description of the sanctuary of Melqart, whom he calls Heracles, because the Greeks believed these two deities were identical.

Herodotus on the Temple of Melqart

Because I wanted to know more about it, I made a voyage to Tyre in Phoenicia, because I had been told that in that place there was a holy temple of Heracles. The sanctuary was richly furnished, there were many votive offerings, and I noticed two pillars: one of pure gold and one of an emerald stone of such size as to shine by night.

I interviewed the priests of the god, and asked them how long ago their temple had been built, and I discovered that they were at variance with the Greeks, because they said that the temple had been built when Tyre had been founded, and that this happened 2,300 years ago.


http://www.livius.or...e/tyre_t01.html

That would mean that Tyre was founded 450+2300 = 2750 BCE.



At last they arrived at the Phœnician coast, 193 years after Atland was submerged. Near the coast they found an island with two deep bays, so that there appeared to be three islands. In the middle one they established themselves, and afterwards built a city wall round the place. Then they wanted to give it a name, but disagreed about it. Some wanted to call it Fryasburgt, others Neeftunia; but the Magyars and Finns begged that it might be called Thyrhisburgt.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#ax

So according to the OLB this happened in 2194-193 = 2001 BCE.



Preserving Lebanon’s coastal archaeology: Beirut, Sidon and Tyre
Nick Marriner, Christophe Morhange


(..)

The areas surrounding the present seaports are rich in buried archaeological monuments and relics, bearing witness to a complex history of human occupation spanning some 5000 years. Using a multi-disciplinary geoarchaeological approach,recent study has enhanced understanding of the development of dock and harbour installations. We have identified a number of important waterfront areas (Figs. 1 -3), significant in comprehending the evolution of maritime infrstructure and thexpansion of shipping activities along the Levantine seaboarfrom the Bronze Age onwards[52 - 56,58]. The heart of Beirut, Sidon and Tyre’s main anchorage havens today lie land-locked in the city centres, buried beneath the tracts of coastal sediment.

http://www.academia...._Sidon_and_Tyre



You all may chose between the OLB on the one hand, and archeology and Herodotus on the other hand.

I know which one I'd pick, lol.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 23 January 2013 - 03:02 PM.


#2313    NO-ID-EA

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:23 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 23 January 2013 - 02:42 PM, said:

I quoted Herodotus in my former post (the Israeli professor), and here's another quote:

The Greek researcher Herodotus of Halicarnassus visited Tyre in the mid-fifth century BCE. In Histories 2.44, he offers a description of the sanctuary of Melqart, whom he calls Heracles, because the Greeks believed these two deities were identical.

Herodotus on the Temple of Melqart

Because I wanted to know more about it, I made a voyage to Tyre in Phoenicia, because I had been told that in that place there was a holy temple of Heracles. The sanctuary was richly furnished, there were many votive offerings, and I noticed two pillars: one of pure gold and one of an emerald stone of such size as to shine by night.

I interviewed the priests of the god, and asked them how long ago their temple had been built, and I discovered that they were at variance with the Greeks, because they said that the temple had been built when Tyre had been founded, and that this happened 2,300 years ago.


http://www.livius.or...e/tyre_t01.html

That would mean that Tyre was founded 450+2300 = 2750 BCE.



At last they arrived at the Phœnician coast, 193 years after Atland was submerged. Near the coast they found an island with two deep bays, so that there appeared to be three islands. In the middle one they established themselves, and afterwards built a city wall round the place. Then they wanted to give it a name, but disagreed about it. Some wanted to call it Fryasburgt, others Neeftunia; but the Magyars and Finns begged that it might be called Thyrhisburgt.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#ax

So according to the OLB this happened in 2194-193 = 2001 BCE.



Preserving Lebanon’s coastal archaeology: Beirut, Sidon and Tyre
Nick Marriner, Christophe Morhange


(..)

The areas surrounding the present seaports are rich in buried archaeological monuments and relics, bearing witness to a complex history of human occupation spanning some 5000 years. Using a multi-disciplinary geoarchaeological approach,recent study has enhanced understanding of the development of dock and harbour installations. We have identified a number of important waterfront areas (Figs. 1 -3), significant in comprehending the evolution of maritime infrstructure and thexpansion of shipping activities along the Levantine seaboarfrom the Bronze Age onwards[52 - 56,58]. The heart of Beirut, Sidon and Tyre’s main anchorage havens today lie land-locked in the city centres, buried beneath the tracts of coastal sediment.

http://www.academia...._Sidon_and_Tyre  





You all may chose between the OLB on the one hand, and archeology and Herodotus on the other hand.

I know which one I'd pick, lol.


.

Weird how these things seem to keep coming around in circles......................Tyre..non aspirated TYR .......TROY.. non aspirated TRY



could Herodotus have got it wrong and he was told 2,300 years AM , what difference would that make ?


Also funnily enough after Apols post not long ago.........before King Oswald..(Wr-Alda ?) asked St Aiden to move from Iona and found the Monastery at Lindisfarne , which they named themselves.. it was actually called the island of Medcaut ... (is that fairly close to Melqart.. just a coincidence i suppose)

Also what Apol was saying about two islands.......although Bamborough is now part of the mainland , it itself was an island before the 11th Century, and only silted up after this


No chance i suppose that when nef-teunis said he went to phoenicia to found Tyre , he could have meant Britain because it was conquered by the phoenicians by then ?? ......perhaps the Magi wanted to call part of it Thyrhisburght after their homelands ??.


Could that then bring us back to "was Tyr/Try (Troy)in Britain " which i remember came up on this board a while ago....??


Also Oswalds father was Aethelfrith , whos father i think was King Ida of Berenice , same name as the mount Ida where a lot the Greek Gods are supposed to have come from, .i think Ida had 12 sons . Theodoric and Hussa were a couple... need to check

Edited by NO-ID-EA, 23 January 2013 - 05:28 PM.


#2314    The Puzzler

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:42 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 23 January 2013 - 02:42 PM, said:

I quoted Herodotus in my former post (the Israeli professor), and here's another quote:

The Greek researcher Herodotus of Halicarnassus visited Tyre in the mid-fifth century BCE. In Histories 2.44, he offers a description of the sanctuary of Melqart, whom he calls Heracles, because the Greeks believed these two deities were identical.

Herodotus on the Temple of Melqart

Because I wanted to know more about it, I made a voyage to Tyre in Phoenicia, because I had been told that in that place there was a holy temple of Heracles. The sanctuary was richly furnished, there were many votive offerings, and I noticed two pillars: one of pure gold and one of an emerald stone of such size as to shine by night.

I interviewed the priests of the god, and asked them how long ago their temple had been built, and I discovered that they were at variance with the Greeks, because they said that the temple had been built when Tyre had been founded, and that this happened 2,300 years ago.


http://www.livius.or...e/tyre_t01.html

That would mean that Tyre was founded 450+2300 = 2750 BCE.



At last they arrived at the Phœnician coast, 193 years after Atland was submerged. Near the coast they found an island with two deep bays, so that there appeared to be three islands. In the middle one they established themselves, and afterwards built a city wall round the place. Then they wanted to give it a name, but disagreed about it. Some wanted to call it Fryasburgt, others Neeftunia; but the Magyars and Finns begged that it might be called Thyrhisburgt.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#ax

So according to the OLB this happened in 2194-193 = 2001 BCE.



Preserving Lebanon’s coastal archaeology: Beirut, Sidon and Tyre
Nick Marriner, Christophe Morhange


(..)

The areas surrounding the present seaports are rich in buried archaeological monuments and relics, bearing witness to a complex history of human occupation spanning some 5000 years. Using a multi-disciplinary geoarchaeological approach,recent study has enhanced understanding of the development of dock and harbour installations. We have identified a number of important waterfront areas (Figs. 1 -3), significant in comprehending the evolution of maritime infrstructure and thexpansion of shipping activities along the Levantine seaboarfrom the Bronze Age onwards[52 - 56,58]. The heart of Beirut, Sidon and Tyre’s main anchorage havens today lie land-locked in the city centres, buried beneath the tracts of coastal sediment.

http://www.academia...._Sidon_and_Tyre



You all may chose between the OLB on the one hand, and archeology and Herodotus on the other hand.

I know which one I'd pick, lol.


.

I have no problem with Tyre being settled when Herodotus said it was.

One of my older topics: http://www.unexplain...c

Quote

The Puzzler on Oct 19 2008, 07:22 AM, said:

What did you think of my evidence showing that Tyre could have been settled back when Herodotus said it was?

Maybe you can convince the rest of the crew here including Leonardo who answered my question, cause they sure didn't buy my reasoning or archaeological evidence I provided.

I also know the OLB date is later than when Herodotus said though. I hate that OLB timeline.

Edited by The Puzzler, 23 January 2013 - 05:52 PM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#2315    The Puzzler

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:51 PM

View PostApol, on 23 January 2013 - 02:39 PM, said:


Thank you - that's indeed an interesting observation. I have another theory, though. Here it is:
It is written: "...thousands of Gola have went to North Brittanja. A short time ago the uppermost of the Golum was established at the burgh which is called Kêrenäk – which means ‘corner’, from where he gave his commands to all the other Gola. All their gold was also brought together there. Kêrenherne, or Kêrenäk, is a stone burgh which before belonged to Kälta,"
When Âskar had overpowered the Phoenician priests, the Dênamarkers became green with envy, and they would cross the sea to catch him. This indicates that we should search for Kälta's former burgh on the east coast of Great Britain. There exists an age-old fortification on the hilltops of Eildon Hill near Melrose, just south of today's Scottish border. At these heights - alongside the River Tweed - the largest settlement of the Scottish Bronze Age is situated. Upon the more than 300 horizontal foundations that are cut into the hillside, between 3,000 and 6,000 people had their residences; and one knows that there was activity in the place as far back in time as around 1000 BC. The ramparts have been built and rebuilt in three stages - the last time by the Romans in the 1st century BC. The Romans named the hillfort Trimontium - from Eildon Hill's three mountain peaks.
The text says that Âskar took two islands as shelter for his ships. There exist very few islands on the east coast of Great Britain, but just 25 kms south of where River Tweed empties into the North Sea, we have the Farne Islands - which certainly also must have been the only ilands that suited for Âskar's purpose. The sea kings wanted small islands just outside the coast as safe harbours for their ships - especially islands with deep bays, but also two islands situated beside each other, between which the fleet could lay sheltered from wind and waves. This was the reason why Âskar chose two islands. If the Farne Islands was the place, I would believe that he occupied the innermost of the island groups, as it looks like they must have been the most suitable. He may have sailed his fleet into the creek formed by the Inner Farne and West Wideopen with Knoxes Reef. The sandbanks between these islands must have been suitable for landing.

'Farne' is usually explained as being a gaelic-scotch name derived from ærn ('house') or fearn ('distant'). Yet, there lies also a Farne island separated alongside the coast, a little farther northwest. This tidal island, which at ebb-tide is linked to land, is called Lindisfarne or Lindesfarne. It is famous for its monastery, and from the fact that the Vikings attacked it in AD 793 and thus initiated the Viking Age. This would have been a natural site for the first stopping of intruders to Eildon Hill, as well as for the defence of the coastline.
The burgh was not formed like a ringwallburgh - according to the Frisian tradition of how a burgh should look like. That was not in Kälta's interest - to her the protection of her territory was the essential, which she could do in the same way as the Gola.
One do not know the background of the name Lindisfarne; though Anthony D. Mills has forwarded a theory that it should mean 'the island of the travellers from Lindsey'.
I think the background of the name has a slightly different history. Kälta's burgh was called Kêren.äk – in Frisian they called it Kêren.herne. When Âskar conquered the burgh he renamed it Linda.s.herne in memory of Adela Oera Linda. After the Magy was killed, several sites were named from her - first and foremost Lindas.nose and Lindas.burch.Âskar's renaming of Kêren.herne was one of his several attempts to cotton up to the Adelings.

Interesting idea Apol.

Seems the Lindisfaras were an Anglian tribe.

Place-name evidence indicates that the Anglian settlement known as Lindisfaras spread from the Humber coast.
http://en.wikipedia....gdom_of_Lindsey

The Lindisfaras (or Lindesfaras) (Old English Lindisfaran) were an Anglian tribe who, in the 6th century, established the kingdom of Lindsey between the valleys of the rivers Humber and Witham, in the north of what is now Lincolnshire
http://en.wikipedia....iki/Lindisfaras

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#2316    Abramelin

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 07:46 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 23 January 2013 - 05:42 PM, said:

I have no problem with Tyre being settled when Herodotus said it was.

One of my older topics: http://www.unexplain...c



Maybe you can convince the rest of the crew here including Leonardo who answered my question, cause they sure didn't buy my reasoning or archaeological evidence I provided.

I also know the OLB date is later than when Herodotus said though. I hate that OLB timeline.

Well, what can I say: I showed you there is archeological proof Tyre was founded 5000 years ago.

Herodotus is always considered to be a guy fabricating history, but many of his so called fabrications have been proven to be true after all.

I have always been skeptical about Herodotus and his writings (because I was told he was a fantast), but he has been proven right, many times.

And yes, he has been proven wrong often too.

But that does not make him a liar.

He may have just written down what people told him, and his only fault is that he believed what he was told.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 23 January 2013 - 07:54 PM.


#2317    Abramelin

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 07:59 PM

Apol,

You say there are not many islands at the east coast of England, but there was a large and important one (and not an island anymore now) :

http://en.wikipedia..../Isle_of_Thanet

Posted Image

Edited by Abramelin, 23 January 2013 - 08:55 PM.


#2318    cormac mac airt

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:04 PM

View PostNO-ID-EA, on 23 January 2013 - 05:23 PM, said:

Weird how these things seem to keep coming around in circles......................Tyre..non aspirated TYR .......TROY.. non aspirated TRY



could Herodotus have got it wrong and he was told 2,300 years AM , what difference would that make ?


Also funnily enough after Apols post not long ago.........before King Oswald..(Wr-Alda ?) asked St Aiden to move from Iona and found the Monastery at Lindisfarne , which they named themselves.. it was actually called the island of Medcaut ... (is that fairly close to Melqart.. just a coincidence i suppose)

Also what Apol was saying about two islands.......although Bamborough is now part of the mainland , it itself was an island before the 11th Century, and only silted up after this


No chance i suppose that when nef-teunis said he went to phoenicia to found Tyre , he could have meant Britain because it was conquered by the phoenicians by then ?? ......perhaps the Magi wanted to call part of it Thyrhisburght after their homelands ??.


Could that then bring us back to "was Tyr/Try (Troy)in Britain " which i remember came up on this board a while ago....??


Also Oswalds father was Aethelfrith , whos father i think was King Ida of Berenice , same name as the mount Ida where a lot the Greek Gods are supposed to have come from, .i think Ida had 12 sons . Theodoric and Hussa were a couple... need to check

Almost. Oswalds lineage (ascending) is:  Oswald > Aethelfrith > Aethelric > Ida of Bernicia

Ida's sons are listed as:

Adda
Belric
Theoderic
Aethelric
Theodhere
Osmer
Bearnoch
Ocga
Ealric
Ecca
Oswald
Sogor
Sogethere


cormac

Edited by cormac mac airt, 23 January 2013 - 08:04 PM.

The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonise, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. --  Plato's Timaeus

#2319    The Puzzler

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:11 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 23 January 2013 - 07:46 PM, said:

Well, what can I say: I showed you there is archeological proof Tyre was founded 5000 years ago.

Herodotus is always considered to be a guy fabricating history, but many of his so called fabrications have been proven to be true after all.

I have always been skeptical about Herodotus and his writings (because I was told he was a fantast), but he has been proven right, many times.

And yes, he has been proven wrong often too.

But that does not make him a liar.

He may have just written down what people told him, and his only fault is that he believed what he was told.

.
I totally agree. I understand when he wrote he was getting 2nd hand news, he makes very little assunptions himself (one is about the Nile), he was not lying, maybe those who were telling him things didn't really know, now they wanna shoot the messenger, but I love it when the information he gave is shown to be right.

The OLB has this time put this event later than what might be the true time frame, makes a change from being put earlier anyway....

I'll put on my thinking cap.

See, this is what is really weird, had this been a hoax, and the writers would have surely known Herodotus works - why put events totally out of known chronology if they wanted to be believed...?

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#2320    The Puzzler

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:29 AM

There is some other info concerning when the Phoenicians/Tyrians arrived, in Herodotus. It would have to be a time when Assyria was around.

According to the Persians best informed in history, the Phoenicians began to quarrel. This people, who had formerly dwelt on the shores of the Erythraean Sea, having migrated to the Mediterranean and settled in the parts which they now inhabit, began at once, they say, to adventure on long voyages, freighting their vessels with the wares of Egypt and Assyria. They landed at many places on the coast, and among the rest at Argos, which was then preeminent above all the states included now under the common name of Hellas.
http://classics.mit....istory.1.i.html

23rd-22nd century BC is the earliest one could really have the Assyrians imo.

Late 25th century would be the absolute earliest if you stretched it to before Sargon.

But then you'd have to have evidence they freighted their wares to Argos and made long voyages in that timeframe.

Edited by The Puzzler, 24 January 2013 - 03:30 AM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#2321    The Puzzler

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 05:36 AM

It's possible the priests were wrong and gave a longer date they were established than they really were.
Tyre might have been inhabited but not by the Tyrians Herodotus talks about, who more likely imo, arrived during this timeframe:
(I have the same issue with Athens when i discuss Atlantis, its been inhabited since 7th millenium, but by Athenians?)

From the mid 14th century BC through to the 11th century BC, much of Canaan (particularly the north, central and eastern regions of Syria and the north western Mediterranean coastal regions) fell to the Middle Assyrian Empire, and both Egyptian and Hittite influence waned as a result. Powerful Assyrian kings forced tribute on Caananite states and cities from north, east and central Syria as far as the Mediterranean.[26] Arik-den-ili (c. 1307-1296 BC), consolidated Assyrian power in the Levant, he defeated and conquered Semitic tribes of the so-called Ahlamu group.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canaan

This is when Assyrians ruled Canaan.

Now later than the OLB timeframe but not as early as 2750BC per the Tyrian priests Herodotus spoke to or the first inhabitation of Tyre.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#2322    Abramelin

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 09:08 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 24 January 2013 - 05:36 AM, said:

It's possible the priests were wrong and gave a longer date they were established than they really were.
Tyre might have been inhabited but not by the Tyrians Herodotus talks about, who more likely imo, arrived during this timeframe:
(I have the same issue with Athens when i discuss Atlantis, its been inhabited since 7th millenium, but by Athenians?)

From the mid 14th century BC through to the 11th century BC, much of Canaan (particularly the north, central and eastern regions of Syria and the north western Mediterranean coastal regions) fell to the Middle Assyrian Empire, and both Egyptian and Hittite influence waned as a result. Powerful Assyrian kings forced tribute on Caananite states and cities from north, east and central Syria as far as the Mediterranean.[26] Arik-den-ili (c. 1307-1296 BC), consolidated Assyrian power in the Levant, he defeated and conquered Semitic tribes of the so-called Ahlamu group.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canaan

This is when Assyrians ruled Canaan.

Now later than the OLB timeframe but not as early as 2750BC per the Tyrian priests Herodotus spoke to or the first inhabitation of Tyre.

The important point is that Tyre was inhabited for 5000 years. By whom doesn't matter that much.

Why not?

Because the OLB never says Tyre was already inhabited when Nef Teunis' men settled there.

And you can expect some 'opposition' when you invade an already inhabited island the size of Tyre.


#2323    Abramelin

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 09:18 PM

View PostNO-ID-EA, on 23 January 2013 - 05:23 PM, said:


<snip>

No chance i suppose that when nef-teunis said he went to phoenicia to found Tyre , he could have meant Britain because it was conquered by the phoenicians by then ?? ......perhaps the Magi wanted to call part of it Thyrhisburght after their homelands ??.


Could that then bring us back to "was Tyr/Try (Troy)in Britain " which i remember came up on this board a while ago....??

<snip>


Nef Teunis entered the "MIddle Sea" and then his men settled Tyre.

If that 'Middle Sea' was not the Mediterranean, what was it? The North Sea?


#2324    Abramelin

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 09:27 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 24 January 2013 - 03:11 AM, said:

I totally agree. I understand when he wrote he was getting 2nd hand news, he makes very little assunptions himself (one is about the Nile), he was not lying, maybe those who were telling him things didn't really know, now they wanna shoot the messenger, but I love it when the information he gave is shown to be right.

The OLB has this time put this event later than what might be the true time frame, makes a change from being put earlier anyway....

I'll put on my thinking cap.

See, this is what is really weird, had this been a hoax, and the writers would have surely known Herodotus works - why put events totally out of known chronology if they wanted to be believed...?

To make a fake ancient manuscript look authentic, you don't simply copy and paste from known sources. You must introduce a new twist on accepted history.

The ones or the one who wrote the OLB can not be blamed for a having a lack of creativity.


#2325    Knul

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 11:04 PM

View PostApol, on 23 January 2013 - 02:39 PM, said:


Thank you - that's indeed an interesting observation. I have another theory, though. Here it is:
It is written: "...thousands of Gola have went to North Brittanja. A short time ago the uppermost of the Golum was established at the burgh which is called Kêrenäk – which means ‘corner’, from where he gave his commands to all the other Gola. All their gold was also brought together there. Kêrenherne, or Kêrenäk, is a stone burgh which before belonged to Kälta,"
When Âskar had overpowered the Phoenician priests, the Dênamarkers became green with envy, and they would cross the sea to catch him. This indicates that we should search for Kälta's former burgh on the east coast of Great Britain. There exists an age-old fortification on the hilltops of Eildon Hill near Melrose, just south of today's Scottish border. At these heights - alongside the River Tweed - the largest settlement of the Scottish Bronze Age is situated. Upon the more than 300 horizontal foundations that are cut into the hillside, between 3,000 and 6,000 people had their residences; and one knows that there was activity in the place as far back in time as around 1000 BC. The ramparts have been built and rebuilt in three stages - the last time by the Romans in the 1st century BC. The Romans named the hillfort Trimontium - from Eildon Hill's three mountain peaks.
The text says that Âskar took two islands as shelter for his ships. There exist very few islands on the east coast of Great Britain, but just 25 kms south of where River Tweed empties into the North Sea, we have the Farne Islands - which certainly also must have been the only ilands that suited for Âskar's purpose. The sea kings wanted small islands just outside the coast as safe harbours for their ships - especially islands with deep bays, but also two islands situated beside each other, between which the fleet could lay sheltered from wind and waves. This was the reason why Âskar chose two islands. If the Farne Islands was the place, I would believe that he occupied the innermost of the island groups, as it looks like they must have been the most suitable. He may have sailed his fleet into the creek formed by the Inner Farne and West Wideopen with Knoxes Reef. The sandbanks between these islands must have been suitable for landing.

'Farne' is usually explained as being a gaelic-scotch name derived from ærn ('house') or fearn ('distant'). Yet, there lies also a Farne island separated alongside the coast, a little farther northwest. This tidal island, which at ebb-tide is linked to land, is called Lindisfarne or Lindesfarne. It is famous for its monastery, and from the fact that the Vikings attacked it in AD 793 and thus initiated the Viking Age. This would have been a natural site for the first stopping of intruders to Eildon Hill, as well as for the defence of the coastline.
The burgh was not formed like a ringwallburgh - according to the Frisian tradition of how a burgh should look like. That was not in Kälta's interest - to her the protection of her territory was the essential, which she could do in the same way as the Gola.
One do not know the background of the name Lindisfarne; though Anthony D. Mills has forwarded a theory that it should mean 'the island of the travellers from Lindsey'.
I think the background of the name has a slightly different history. Kälta's burgh was called Kêren.äk – in Frisian they called it Kêren.herne. When Âskar conquered the burgh he renamed it Linda.s.herne in memory of Adela Oera Linda. After the Magy was killed, several sites were named from her - first and foremost Lindas.nose and Lindas.burch.Âskar's renaming of Kêren.herne was one of his several attempts to cotton up to the Adelings.


Kerenak can be found in the area of the Cornavii and Caereni on the northern coast of Scotland. Even the two islands, where Askar hided his ships are shown.

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