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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#3391    Abramelin

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 09:04 AM

If it does indeed mean 'slave' and not Slavonic, then it is not correct Old Frisian:

http://www.etymonlin...owed_in_frame=0

.

Edited by Abramelin, 07 April 2013 - 09:04 AM.


#3392    The Puzzler

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:15 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 07 April 2013 - 02:57 AM, said:

I'll go with the idea it's a borrowing from Latin, and that Latin borrowed it from Aramaic or Hebrew:

http://www.unexplain...25#entry4716524

OK but I don't buy it. I'm agreeing with gestur:

Quote

That "probable" etymology sucks.

Hebrew kuttoneth and Aramaic kittuna are related to cotton (Dutch: katoen, Arabic qutn)

tunic = to-neck is the most plausible explanation


Edited by The Puzzler, 07 April 2013 - 10:22 AM.

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#3393    The Puzzler

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:18 AM

wield (v.)
Old English weldan (Mercian), wieldan, wealdan (West Saxon) "to govern, possess, have control over" (class VII strong verb; past tense weold, past participle gewealden), merged with weak verb wyldan, both from Proto-Germanic *wal-t- (cf. Old Saxon and Gothic waldan, Old Frisian walda "to govern, rule," Old Norse valda "to rule, wield, to cause," Old High German waltan, German walten "to rule, govern").


Looking somewhat like a word for Wralda imo.

I know the old man age old etymology but that could be all wrong.

to govern, have control over, to cause - sounds quite logical to me.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
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#3394    The Puzzler

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:32 AM

View Postgestur, on 07 April 2013 - 08:16 AM, said:



tunic = to-neck is the most plausible explanation

In the form of tohnekka, yes.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
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#3395    Ott

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:54 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 07 April 2013 - 08:54 AM, said:

It is another explanation, yes, but not the most plausible one.

It is.
Yours is what you call Lego-etymology, tossing around letters.

TOHNEKKA (olb) - TONICA (Italian) =>> T-N-K

kuttoneth - kittuna - cotton - katoen - qutn =>> K-T-N

Why would the K-sound have moved to the back?

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"SAVED FROM THE FLOOD" ~ Oera Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com/


#3396    The Puzzler

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 12:01 PM

One thing that bothers me is the apparent use of what seems to be a Latin v in place of letters. eg; svn, bedrvm

This seems to occur when the letter is a double o sound - could be soon/zoon became son and it is room - has anyone else noticed any pattern with this small v used in words?

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#3397    Abramelin

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 12:15 PM

View Postgestur, on 07 April 2013 - 10:54 AM, said:

It is.
Yours is what you call Lego-etymology, tossing around letters.

TOHNEKKA (olb) - TONICA (Italian) =>> T-N-K

kuttoneth - kittuna - cotton - katoen - qutn =>> K-T-N

Why would the K-sound have moved to the back?

No, THIS is an example of lego-etymology:

tunic = to-neck

The Semitic etymology is nothing but a probable one, the Latin one ("tunica") is most probably the one used for the OLB.

To make it look Old Frisian-ish, they fabricated "tohnekka".

These things didn't reach the neck persé; Google 'tunica', images, and you'll see.for yourself.


#3398    Abramelin


#3399    The Puzzler

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 12:47 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 07 April 2013 - 12:15 PM, said:

No, THIS is an example of lego-etymology:

tunic = to-neck

The Semitic etymology is nothing but a probable one, the Latin one ("tunica") is most probably the one used for the OLB.

To make it look Old Frisian-ish, they fabricated "tohnekka".

These things didn't reach the neck persé; Google 'tunica', images, and you'll see.for yourself.

They did actually.

The body garment was loose-fitting for males, usually beginning at the neck and ending above the knee. A woman's garment could be either close fitting or loose, beginning at the neck and extending over a skirt or skirts
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunic

The Semitic etymology is not for tunic - it's for cotton/linen. Also, a website I showed said it might be Etruscan, that's how probable the Hebrew/Phoenician/Semitic link is...

Edited by The Puzzler, 07 April 2013 - 12:47 PM.

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#3400    Abramelin

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 12:57 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 07 April 2013 - 12:47 PM, said:

They did actually.

The body garment was loose-fitting for males, usually beginning at the neck and ending above the knee. A woman's garment could be either close fitting or loose, beginning at the neck and extending over a skirt or skirts
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunic

The Semitic etymology is not for tunic - it's for cotton/linen. Also, a website I showed said it might be Etruscan, that's how probable the Hebrew/Phoenician/Semitic link is...

The images I posted are examples of ancient and modern times, and as you can see, not reaching up to the neck.

And I said that the Semitic etymology is a probable one, even though based on 'cotton', but the Latin word 'tunica' is very probably the source of the OLB word tohnekka.


#3401    Abramelin

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:02 PM

Btw, every time Sandbach uses "neck" in his translation, the original says "hals".

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/


#3402    The Puzzler

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:04 PM

The OLB says a troop of Far Krekalanders who had taken Troy came and settled Rum, spacious. This word appears as a general IE word for roomy. The Fryans did not name Rome, the Greeks did, using a word that was also in the Fryan language - so the Greeks who named it must have spoken a same/similar language - which is probably many of the IE roots, which could have went into Greek, Athens, Attica, where the Fryans were, then passed back along, so, the same in Italy, the Fryans would have passed on many words with etymological meanings only found in Fryan/Frisian then they appear in written Latin and we know of them there first, but from where did they arrive into these languages? Sure some Hittite, some Phoenician in Greek, which as the OLB has it, might be Fryan influenced too - so there is good explanations for how words of Frisian descent ended up in Latin as unknown meanings of words they then used.

It's a chicken or the egg scenario really and no real winner, I could argue that for every word, but concentrating just on words that have a clear etymologically meaning in Frisian or older Fryan against one whose etymology is unknown is worth a little effort imo.

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#3403    The Puzzler

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:05 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 07 April 2013 - 12:57 PM, said:

The images I posted are examples of ancient and modern times, and as you can see, not reaching up to the neck.

And I said that the Semitic etymology is a probable one, even though based on 'cotton', but the Latin word 'tunica' is very probably the source of the OLB word tohnekka.

See my answer in post #3402 - chicken or the egg until I can find more info for now.

hals...it never ends, lol - I'll check it out more.

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#3404    The Puzzler

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:11 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 07 April 2013 - 01:02 PM, said:

Btw, every time Sandbach uses "neck" in his translation, the original says "hals".

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/

hals might mean 'head'.

heil-a




3, *hagila?, afries., sw. M. (n): nhd. Kopf; ne. head

Edited by The Puzzler, 07 April 2013 - 01:14 PM.

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#3405    Abramelin

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:13 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 07 April 2013 - 01:11 PM, said:

hals might mean 'head'.

Lol, no, it's very Dutch and Frisian or Germanic for neck/throat.