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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#4156    The Puzzler

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 02:05 PM

A few Anglo-Saxon words containing oath:
Aewda: oath-giver, compurgator.
Ath: oath.
Fore-ath:, preliminary oath;
Rim-ath: oath by accused and compurgators together.

http://www.everythin...oms%3A Glossary

Seems to me a very important word in Anglo-Saxon language and meaning possibly used in many ways including someone who was considered a friend by way of a pact.


Germanic warrior culture was significantly based on oaths of fealty, directly continued into medieval notions of chivalry.

An oath (from Anglo-Saxon āð, also called plight) is either a statement of fact or a promise calling upon something or someone that the oath maker considers sacred, usually God, as a witness to the binding nature of the promise or the truth of the statement of fact.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oath

Allies is good because you swore allegiance...

In feudal times a person would also swear allegiance to his feudal superiors.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oath_of_allegiance

Origin:
before 900; Middle English ooth, Old English āth; cognate with German Eid


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/oath


directly continued into medieval notions of chivalry

I actually have an Aunty Ethel (being the very English Anglo-Saxon kinda gal I am...)

Ethel
noble, honorable; noble snake; noble strength ... origin is Old English, and its use, English ...

Ethela
noble, honorable ... origin is Old English ... form of Ethel ... rare as a baby girl name ...

Ethelberga
noble fortress ... has its origins in the English ... variant of Aethelburh ... not popular as a baby name for ...

Ethelberta
nobly famous ... used mostly in English and it is of ... name was borne by a central character in ...

Ethelburg
noble fortress ... origin, as well as its use, is in the English ... variant of Aethelburh ...

Ethelburga
noble fortress ... origin and use are both in the English language ... variant form of Aethelburh ...

Etheld
noble, honorable ... has its origins in the Old English ... variant of Ethel ...

Ethelda
noble, honorable ... has its origins in the Old English ... variant form of Ethel ...

Ethelde
noble, honorable ... of Old English origin ... derivative of Ethel ... uncommon as a baby girl name ...

Etheldred
noble strength ... primarily used in the English ... contraction of Etheldreda ...

Etheldreda
noble strength ... used chiefly in English and it is ... name was borne by Saint Etheldreda...

http://www.babynamespedia.com/start/f/eth

Edited by The Puzzler, 24 June 2013 - 02:14 PM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4157    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 03:06 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 24 June 2013 - 01:04 PM, said:

No, that is what you're bound to get by using the TRANSLATION.

The word 'friends' is in the OLB and it's not atha.

atha is another word, maybe not in use anymore, also like salt-atha - so a close translational word was given, friends.

allies is good imo. Your friend under oath. A friend by way of an oath to each other. salt-allies = men paid in salt to work for you in service, to be your allies.


It appears to me to be a word in it's own right, atha and salt-atha, that was based on the word oath (become a friend/allies) and has fallen out of use.

Now look again at this sentence from the OLB:


7. Lêt maen hja aefternêi hlâpa, sâ lêt maen thaet mith welhêd thrvch tha fâmna dva, til thju wi âtha aend frjunda winna fori lêtha aend fyandun.
7. If they are afterwards set free, it must be done with kindness by the maidens, in order that we may make them comrades and friends, instead of haters and enemies.

Nothing suggests any relation with an "oath".

But it does suggest something opposite of 'hater'.

And don't forget: the OLB is supposed to have been put onto paper in the 6th century BCE for the first time. That is like 1600 years older than your sources.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 24 June 2013 - 03:06 PM.


#4158    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 03:17 PM

Or this:

Vppa rêd Minervas waerth hju Athenia heten: hwand sêide hju, tha aefter kvmand agon to wêtane, that wi hir navt thrvch lest ner weld kvmen send, men lik âtha vntfongen.
By the advice of Min-erva it was called Athens, because, she said, those who come after us ought to know that we are not here by cunning or violence, but were received as friends.

Here âtha may not mean ''friends", but what has any 'oath' to do with people meeting each other for the first time?


#4159    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 04:50 PM

A new one:

Drêi as hja thju hâva innomth hêde wildon tha wilda salt-âtha thaet thorp aend vsa skipa birâwa. Ên salt-âthe hêde al en bukja skaend, men Sêkrops wilde thaet navt ne haengja,

When they had taken our harbour, the wild soldiers wanted to plunder the village and our ships—one had already ravished a girl—but Cecrops would not permit it;

(MS 073/line 22)

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bc


So the OLB "bukja" is supposed to mean "girl" according to Ottema/Sandbach.

The only similar sounding word is a Frisian first name, Boukje/Baukje, which is derived form "badu" (=strong). According to others it's derived from "Baue" (and then "Baukje" would be its diminutive form).

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauke
http://www.betekenis...en.nl/naam/Baue

Another similar word is "bokje", or 'young goat'.


#4160    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 04:57 PM

A closely related word in English is "buck":

buck (n.1)
"male deer," c.1300, earlier "male goat;" from Old English bucca "male goat," from Proto-Germanic *bukkon (cf. Old Saxon buck, Middle Dutch boc, Dutch bok, Old High German boc, German Bock, Old Norse bokkr), perhaps from a PIE root *bhugo (cf. Avestan buza "buck, goat," Armenian buc "lamb"), but some speculate that it is from a lost pre-Germanic language. Barnhart says Old English buc "male deer," listed in some sources, is a "ghost word or scribal error."

http://www.etymonlin...owed_in_frame=0

The OLB "bukja" is the diminutive form of "buk"

And what did this "salt-athe" do with the "bukja? He ''ravished" it according to Sandbach.

Ên salt-âthe hêde al en bukja skaend
Eén soldaat had al een bokje (ge)schonden

("Geschonden" is the past participle of "schenden" = to defile)

One soldier had already defiled a ... little buck??

LOL. Perverts.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 24 June 2013 - 05:08 PM.


#4161    Othar Winis

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 05:13 PM

View PostFrom 24 June 2013 - 03:06 PM:

lÍtha aend fyandun / haters and enemies
"Haters" is Sandbach's translation of Ottema's "haters"
Oldfrisian dictionaries:
De Haan Hettema (1832 and 1874) => vijand => enemy
Richthofen (1840) => bŲse => angry, evil

Edited by gestur, 24 June 2013 - 06:07 PM.

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4162    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 05:18 PM

It gets even better:

Negende hoofdstuk. De soldatentaal / Chapter 9. Soldiers' slang

Bokje: een soldaat./ Bokje: a soldier

http://www.dbnl.org/...d02_01_0011.php


#4163    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 05:19 PM

View Postgestur, on 24 June 2013 - 05:13 PM, said:

"Haters" is Sandbach's translation of Ottema's "haters"
Oldfrisian dictionaries:
De Haan Hettema (1832 and 1874) => vijand => enemyRichthofen (1840) => böse => angry, evil

And what is the opposite of someone who hates? Because that is what the OLB suggests for the meaning of âtha.

Quote

De Haan Hettema (1832 and 1874) => vijand => enemy Richthofen (1840) => böse => angry, evil

Or the opposite of "enemy"?

That can only be "friend", right?

.

Edited by Abramelin, 24 June 2013 - 05:27 PM.


#4164    Othar Winis

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 05:29 PM

View PostFrom 24 June 2013 - 04:57 PM:

One soldier had already defiled a ... little buck??

LOL. Perverts.
WTF are you talking about?

"Buik, in onze bet., in 't mnl. ook balch geheeten; ook in die van moederlijf" (http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...&lemmodern=buik) => belly, mother's body

Your attempts to ridicule the OLB (through its language) don't favor your credibility.

Edited by gestur, 24 June 2013 - 06:27 PM.

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4165    Othar Winis

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 06:09 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 24 June 2013 - 05:19 PM, said:

Or the opposite of "enemy"?

That can only be "friend", right?

or ally (dutch: bondgenoot); not exactly the same as friend

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4166    Othar Winis

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 06:28 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 13 June 2012 - 03:06 AM, said:

Playing with words will never prove the OLB.
Playing with words will never disprove the OLB.

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4167    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:23 PM

View Postgestur, on 24 June 2013 - 05:29 PM, said:

WTF are you talking about?

"Buik, in onze bet., in 't mnl. ook balch geheeten; ook in die van moederlijf" (http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...&lemmodern=buik) => belly, mother's body

Your attempts to ridicule the OLB (through its language) don't favor your credibility.


Do you have any etymology for "bukja"?

You haven't, right?

Nothing at all that comes close to anything meaning "girl".


#4168    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:27 PM

View Postgestur, on 24 June 2013 - 06:28 PM, said:

Playing with words will never disprove the OLB.

But I am only playing your game.

Mangle words, and come to a 'conclusion'....

Like I said many times: it will be archeology that will prove or disprove the OLB, not lego-linguistics.

It's a kid's game, it's nonsense.


#4169    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:31 PM

And when are you going to admit you are "Otharus"?


#4170    Abramelin

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:34 PM

View Postgestur, on 24 June 2013 - 06:09 PM, said:

or ally (dutch: bondgenoot); not exactly the same as friend

Right, not exactly the same as 'friend',  and NOT the opposite of 'enemy'.





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