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SpaceX Launches Falcon 9/Dragon

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 11:48 AM

SpaceX Launches Falcon 9/Dragon on Historic Mission



www.nasa.gov said:

 Image above: The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket<br />
lifts off from Space Launch Complex-40<br />
at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.,<br />
to begin a demonstration flight.<br />
Photo credit: NASA TV
Image above: The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket
lifts off from Space Launch Complex-40
at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.,
to begin a demonstration flight.
Photo credit: NASA TV
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket thundered into space and delivered a Dragon cargo capsule into orbit on May 22, 2012. The launch began an ambitious mission to show that the company is ready to deliver cargo to the International Space Station.

"We're now back on the brink of a new future, a future that embraces the innovation the private sector brings to the table," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "The significance of this day cannot be overstated. While there is a lot of work ahead to successfully complete this mission, we are off to a good start."

Working with an instantaneous launch window, SpaceX, short for Space Exploration Technologies of Hawthorne, Calif., proceeded through a flawless countdown. Liftoff from Space Launch Complex-40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida came at 3:44 a.m. EDT, just as the station was crossing 249 miles above the North Atlantic.

"Every bit of adrenaline in my body released at that moment," said Elon Musk about the moment the rocket lifted off the pad. Musk is the founder, CEO and chief designer of SpaceX. "People were really giving it their all. For us, it was like winning the Super Bowl."

The launch came three days after the rocket aborted a previous launch attempt. William Gerstenmaier, NASA's associate administrator for Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, lauded the company for getting the craft ready for the successful launch.


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#2    Merc14

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 12:26 PM

Great news.  This could be the beginning of a whole new era in manned space flight.

You asked for Obamamerica, now you are going to get it.  Stand by for suck or as Pelosi says, "Embrace the suck".

#3    DieChecker

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 07:37 PM

Yay!!


#4    marcos anthony toledo

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 09:27 PM

Fingers cross for mission sucessfully completed and more to come.


#5    DONTEATUS

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 12:23 AM

God`s Speed Scotty ! ,and the others ! :innocent:

This is a Work in Progress!

#6    turn on tune in

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 01:14 AM

rockets are obsolete and man can get nowhere of interest with them.
the beginning of a new era ?
its like putting the old T ford back into production


#7    Merc14

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 01:38 AM

View Postturn on tune in, on 23 May 2012 - 01:14 AM, said:

rockets are obsolete and man can get nowhere of interest with them.
the beginning of a new era ?
its like putting the old T ford back into production

You're right, we should just quit now since we don't have warp drive or similar.  Just like crossing the Atlantic in a square rigger, what's the point. just redoing what the vikings did but with different sails.  Why run wires across the Atlantic since it is just the same old telegraph with longer wires.  Ivybridge is just another integrated circuit no different in principle than the Pentium so why bother, man can do nowhere of interest with silicon chips.

'Nuff said.

You asked for Obamamerica, now you are going to get it.  Stand by for suck or as Pelosi says, "Embrace the suck".

#8    IronGhost

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 01:57 AM

But it's still rather symbolic, at this point. Consider that the Falcon 9 is more or less 50+ year old technology overall -- not largely different from the Atlas rockets developed on the 1950s by General Dynamics.

Second, the taxpayer is still footing the bill. If the Dragon module succeeds and docks with the ISS, SpaceX sends the bill to ISS. Theyre just farming out basic space trucking to a private company.

What's exciting, if anything, is that this may be the beginning of a greater infrastructure for space exploration involving private industry -- but to make it really exciting, they have to not merely be a replacement for what NASA can no longer do without the Shuttle -- they have to start embarking out on their own ventures, such as mining the asteroids for profits, etc.

But what's really really really needed are all new technologies -- getting away or beyond the old liquid fuel and solid fuel rockets and go to some kind of next-generation launch technology ... and so forth ...

Edited by IronGhost, 23 May 2012 - 01:58 AM.


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#9    csspwns

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 02:36 AM

we still need to invent teleporters, time machines, people silencers, personal robots, blindness curers, and cancer curers for a new era.


#10    DONTEATUS

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 03:15 AM

View Postcsspwns, on 23 May 2012 - 02:36 AM, said:

we still need to invent teleporters, time machines, people silencers, personal robots, blindness curers, and cancer curers for a new era.

Here ! Here ! Im all in on that statement ! Im still working on the replicator ! Im really hungry for some 10hr, Smoked Baby backs ! in a mili-sec !

This is a Work in Progress!

#11    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 04:43 AM

View Postturn on tune in, on 23 May 2012 - 01:14 AM, said:

rockets are obsolete and man can get nowhere of interest with them.
the beginning of a new era ?
its like putting the old T ford back into production
A technology can only become obsolete when there is something better to replace it, for getting into low Earth orbit not only is there no better alternative, there is currently no alternative at all. To go to somewhere you deem interesting we still have to get into orbit first.

Your model T Ford example falls rather flat. Take a look at what powers a modern Formula 1 car... it's basically the same internal combustion engine technology that powered the model T, albeit brought up to date with modern electronics and materials. I would hardly call a modern car obsolete, yet it is using 150 year old technology.


View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:57 AM, said:

But it's still rather symbolic, at this point. Consider that the Falcon 9 is more or less 50+ year old technology overall -- not largely different from the Atlas rockets developed on the 1950s by General Dynamics.
See my answer above.

View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:57 AM, said:

Second, the taxpayer is still footing the bill. If the Dragon module succeeds and docks with the ISS, SpaceX sends the bill to ISS. Theyre just farming out basic space trucking to a private company.
This is only seeing part of the picture. The Falcon rocket was largely developed with private funds. It is also only one of 2 vehicles which will be capable of providing this service.Orbital Sciences are a little way behind, but are preparing their Natures/Cygnus rocket and spacecraft for its first launch. Once both these vehicles have passed testing NASA will be in a position it has not been in before, it will be able to buy services from the lowest bidder. The US tax payer may still foot the bill but, if all goes to plan, it will be a reduced bill.

View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:57 AM, said:

What's exciting, if anything, is that this may be the beginning of a greater infrastructure for space exploration involving private industry -- but to make it really exciting, they have to not merely be a replacement for what NASA can no longer do without the Shuttle -- they have to start embarking out on their own ventures, such as mining the asteroids for profits, etc.
This is the whole point of the current strategy, to kick start the commercialisation of space.

View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:57 AM, said:

But what's really really really needed are all new technologies -- getting away or beyond the old liquid fuel and solid fuel rockets and go to some kind of next-generation launch technology ... and so forth ...
Why? If it ain't broken, don't fix it. Rockets will be the war we get into orbit for the foreseeable future. They may become more exotic.. a British firm has designs for an air breathing rocket, but it is still a rocket none the less.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#12    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 04:44 AM

View Postcsspwns, on 23 May 2012 - 02:36 AM, said:

we still need to invent teleporters, time machines, people silencers, personal robots, blindness curers, and cancer curers for a new era.

View PostDONTEATUS, on 23 May 2012 - 03:15 AM, said:



Here ! Here ! Im all in on that statement ! Im still working on the replicator ! Im really hungry for some 10hr, Smoked Baby backs ! in a mili-sec !
These posts are on topic how exactly?

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#13    IronGhost

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 01:19 PM

I get what you're saying, Waspie, and I'm all happy about what's happening here.

But, jeepers, I mean, in what other industry would we be going bonkers over a return to 50-60 year old technology and be haling it as a new era. Imagine if we were to tell everybody today that they had to trade in their iPod or mp3 player for a radio the size of a breadbox humming with vacuum tubes.

In the world of science and technology, a half-century is an enormously long time -- think about how the Wright brothers made the first flight in 1903 and just 66 years later we were walking on the moon.  It's been about that long since Falcon-class rockets first started lifting stuff into LEO.

There's been so much legitimate talk of other stuff -- rail launchers to orbit, space elevators, various singe-stage-to-orbit launchers -- hey, come on, give me at least a single-stage to orbit vehicle ! -- all of this stuff and more is within our grasp now -- yet we're dialing it back to the 50s! it's difficult not to be a little circumspect about it all.

Yes, yes, getting private guys involved is great -- but I'm thinking in terms of technological determinism here ....


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#14    Merc14

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 01:31 PM

View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:19 PM, said:

I get what you're saying, Waspie, and I'm all happy about what's happening here.

But, jeepers, I mean, in what other industry would we be going bonkers over a return to 50-60 year old technology and be haling it as a new era. Imagine if we were to tell everybody today that they had to trade in their iPod or mp3 player for a radio the size of a breadbox humming with vacuum tubes.

In the world of science and technology, a half-century is an enormously long time -- think about how the Wright brothers made the first flight in 1903 and just 66 years later we were walking on the moon.  It's been about that long since Falcon-class rockets first started lifting stuff into LEO.

There's been so much legitimate talk of other stuff -- rail launchers to orbit, space elevators, various singe-stage-to-orbit launchers -- hey, come on, give me at least a single-stage to orbit vehicle ! -- all of this stuff and more is within our grasp now -- yet we're dialing it back to the 50s! it's difficult not to be a little circumspect about it all.

Yes, yes, getting private guys involved is great -- but I'm thinking in terms of technological determinism here ....

I don't  think it is so much a celebration of technology as it is the first sucessful (so far) commercial venture into space with a man-capable ship.

You asked for Obamamerica, now you are going to get it.  Stand by for suck or as Pelosi says, "Embrace the suck".

#15    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 02:00 PM

View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:19 PM, said:

But, jeepers, I mean, in what other industry would we be going bonkers over a return to 50-60 year old technology and be haling it as a new era. Imagine if we were to tell everybody today that they had to trade in their iPod or mp3 player for a radio the size of a breadbox humming with vacuum tubes.

But that ISN'T what is happening here. There is no going back to anything because there has never been any alternative. Even the shuttle was rocket technology (and 1970's rocket technology at that). I gave you the example of the internal combustion engine. Manufactures are always boasting of advances, yet at the heart of virtually every motor vehicle on the road is a concept old even before the first liquid fuelled rocket took to the skies. You go and tell Ferrari that they are not better than a model T.

View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:19 PM, said:

In the world of science and technology, a half-century is an enormously long time -- think about how the Wright brothers made the first flight in 1903 and just 66 years later we were walking on the moon.  It's been about that long since Falcon-class rockets first started lifting stuff into LEO.

Exactly and why has progress been slow in spaceflight... because everything that has been done has been done under the whim of governments. There has been no competition. No entrepreneurship. These (and warfare) are rhe things that drove aviation forward. This is the new war which is opening up. It has little to do with the technology and everything to do with who controls it.

View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:19 PM, said:

There's been so much legitimate talk of other stuff -- rail launchers to orbit, space elevators, various singe-stage-to-orbit launchers -- hey, come on, give me at least a single-stage to orbit vehicle ! -- all of this stuff and more is within our grasp now -- yet we're dialing it back to the 50s! it's difficult not to be a little circumspect about it all.

Talk is cheap, developing new technology isn't. Just because people talk about a fantastic new technology does not mean it magically comes into existence.

None of those technologies you have mentioned is actually "within our grasp". All of it is still some way off from becoming fact. Even your single stage to orbit vehicle is harder to achieve than you give it credit. NASA spent a fortune attempting to make such a vehicle (the X-33). In the end the project was cancelled because modern materials just have not advanced to the point where the lightness and strength could be achieved economically.


View PostIronGhost, on 23 May 2012 - 01:19 PM, said:

Yes, yes, getting private guys involved is great -- but I'm thinking in terms of technological determinism here ....

Getting private guys involved is essential. It will be from private companies seeking profits, not from government agencies, that the sort of advances you demand will come.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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