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British children 'turn to American English'


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#61    Ealdwita

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 06:24 PM

I recall, whilst attending the Nijmegen 4-day Marches many years ago, we were chatting to a group of RAF musicians from, I believe, the No.1 Bomber Group Pipes and Drums, when an enormous US Marine came up, grabbed a handful of a piper's tartan plaid and drawled, "Hey buddy, what tribe is this then?" The piper was not pleased! If I remember correctly, it was the Hunting McIntyre tartan, (in case you were wondering!)

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#62    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 06:42 AM

View PostArbenol68, on 30 May 2012 - 11:49 PM, said:

This isn't a mispronunciation, it really is ALUMINUM. And it isn't an Americanism either. It has more to do with Humphrey Davy not being able to make up his mind properly.

http://www.worldwide...s/aluminium.htm
There's an "i" before the "um". No other time with "ium" words is the "i" silent.
That link also said they eventually settled on "aluminium".
Although, arguably, we're all saying it wrong as it's a deritiative of "alum" so we should be putting more emphasis on the "m" rather then the "al" because in "alum" it's a hard m sound not a soft one while it's a soft "l" in alum but a hard one in aluminium.

Or we could just call it "tin" like we virtually do here on Oz anyway. Totally wrong, but impossible to mispronounce ;)

Edited by Wearer of Hats, 04 June 2012 - 06:42 AM.

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#63    DKO

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 10:04 AM

Here's a good list of differences in vocabulary between English and American-English.

I noticed Australian vocabulary falls in between. We use certain words from both lists or even have our own words for them.

http://www.englishcl...sh-american.htm

Edited by DKO, 04 June 2012 - 10:07 AM.

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#64    ThePhantomFlanFlinger

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 10:48 AM

View PostDKO, on 04 June 2012 - 10:04 AM, said:

Here's a good list of differences in vocabulary between English and American-English.

I noticed Australian vocabulary falls in between. We use certain words from both lists or even have our own words for them.

http://www.englishcl...sh-american.htm

One thing that has always puzzled me....why do Australians call sausages 'snags'?

Edited by BrianPotter, 04 June 2012 - 10:49 AM.


#65    DKO

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 10:54 AM

View PostBrianPotter, on 04 June 2012 - 10:48 AM, said:

One thing that has always puzzled me....why do Australians call sausages 'snags'?

I'm not really sure, It's not a word I usually use.

Why do Brits call them bangers? :tu:

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#66    ThePhantomFlanFlinger

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 11:02 AM

View PostDKO, on 04 June 2012 - 10:54 AM, said:

I'm not really sure, It's not a word I usually use.

Why do Brits call them bangers? :tu:

Ah...they call them bangers because during rationing they never had enough meat to put in them so they bulked them out with all scraps,fat and floor sweepings.When they cooked them they used to hiss and pop because of all the fat content.Thats why people used to prick them with a fork to stop them exploding..im going to have to go off and search why they are called a snag otherwise it will annoy me..

Edited by BrianPotter, 04 June 2012 - 11:04 AM.


#67    Eldorado

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 11:19 AM

View PostDKO, on 04 June 2012 - 10:54 AM, said:

I'm not really sure, It's not a word I usually use.

Why do Brits call them bangers? :tu:

We just call them sausages, links.. or snarlers!  God knows where "snarler" came from though.

Edited by Eldorado, 04 June 2012 - 11:20 AM.


#68    DKO

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 11:28 AM

View PostBrianPotter, on 04 June 2012 - 11:02 AM, said:

Ah...they call them bangers because during rationing they never had enough meat to put in them so they bulked them out with all scraps,fat and floor sweepings.When they cooked them they used to hiss and pop because of all the fat content.Thats why people used to prick them with a fork to stop them exploding..im going to have to go off and search why they are called a snag otherwise it will annoy me..

Oh yeah cool, you learn something new everyday.

You've got me thinking now, I just searched snag and found this -

[Prob. from Brit dialect snag noun, a morsel.]


Possibly from that.

But we have slang words for most things in Australia, Not usually words that are spoken often but more used around a group of mates etc.

Examples:

Service Station = Servo
Bottle-shop(Alcohol shop) = Bottle-o
McDonalds = Maccas
Ambulance = Ambo's
Afternoon = Arvo
A red haired person = Bluey[older] or Ranga[among younger generations]
A young child = ankle biter
A deal between two friends to do a job = Mates Rates

That's just off the top of my head haha. But again these words wouldn't be used in a formal sense.


http://en.wikipedia....lish_vocabulary

Edited by DKO, 04 June 2012 - 11:51 AM.

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#69    ThePhantomFlanFlinger

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 11:33 AM

View PostDKO, on 04 June 2012 - 11:28 AM, said:

Oh yeah cool, you learn something new everyday.

You've got me thinking now, I just searched snag and found this -

[Prob. from Brit dialect

snagnoun

, a morsel.]

Possibly from that.

But we have slang words for most things in Australia, Not usually words that are spoken often but more used around a group of mates etc.

Examples:

Service Station = Servo
Bottle-shop(Alcohol shop) = Bottle-o
McDonalds = Maccas
Ambulance = Ambo's
Afternoon = Arvo
A red haired person = Bluey[older] or Ranga[among younger generations]
A young child = ankle biter
A deal between two friends to do a job = Mates Rates

That's just off the top of my head haha. But again these words wouldn't be used in a formal sense.

http://en.wikipedia....lish_vocabulary

Hey thanks for that DKO.....that makes sense now with the morsel aspect...cheers :tu: ...


#70    ThePhantomFlanFlinger

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 11:39 AM

View PostEldorado, on 04 June 2012 - 11:19 AM, said:

We just call them sausages, links.. or snarlers!  God knows where "snarler" came from though.

You have the flat ones dont you...?...they sell them round here as Scottish sausages cause we have loads of Scots about..


#71    Sthenno

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 03:42 AM

I don't think there's anything new here...
I'm 28, and I remember being in the script-writing module of my Creative Writing degree 10 years ago. One of our first assignments was to write the script for a prologue to a film, and at least 90% of the students set theirs in the States. We were all quickly embarrassed when the tutor asked us how many of us had actually been to America...
Truth is, we're subjected to many, many stories, but the majority of our  popular media consists of stories set in the US. Therefore, when you're learning to write, it is incredibly easy to slip into a familiar format and write stories set in a world you feel you know, even just fictionally. We're conditioned through the films and TV we're generally exposed to to think that  exciting stories take place in the deserts of Nevada or the streets of New York rather than round the back of the Spar shop in Leeds.
The same thing goes for language... the fact that British students are using Americanisms in their creative work simply implies that the majority of their inspirations are imported films/Tv/stories...

The statement in this article that 'many entries' contained Americanisms depressed me a little, until I read the following statement that 'many' articles also contained references to the Bandersnatch. So... for every kid that calls sweets candy I can have one that references a trippy-as-hell character from a late 19th century book based on a game of chess?

I reckon I can live in that world.


#72    keithisco

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 02:29 PM

View PostArbenol68, on 30 May 2012 - 11:49 PM, said:

This isn't a mispronunciation, it really is ALUMINUM. And it isn't an Americanism either. It has more to do with Humphrey Davy not being able to make up his mind properly.

http://www.worldwide...s/aluminium.htm
No it isnt! ISO properly determines the element as Aluminium (with the "I). Check with any periodic Table. This spelling also conforms with all other "iums" in the periodic table.


#73    keithisco

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 02:33 PM

I think the whole point in having a language "reasonably" quantified, is that you then can have a Thesaurus that gives all of the variants an entry, and everyone can understand what is being said within their own terms of reference.


#74    Arbenol

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 03:15 PM

View Postkeithisco, on 05 June 2012 - 02:29 PM, said:

No it isnt! ISO properly determines the element as Aluminium (with the "I). Check with any periodic Table. This spelling also conforms with all other "iums" in the periodic table.
Keep your panties on! I was responding to a poster who wrote that it was a mispronunciation. It isn't. Americans really do spell it without the 'I'.


#75    questionmark

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 04:22 PM

View PostArbenol68, on 05 June 2012 - 03:15 PM, said:

Keep your panties on! I was responding to a poster who wrote that it was a mispronunciation. It isn't. Americans really do spell it without the 'I'.

It is good old American tradition to swallow at least one syllable in a word containing more than one :devil:

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