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No Such Thing As Aliens On Earth Unless.....


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#151    MR.Blueprint

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 12:25 PM

View PostThe Skater Boy, on 30 March 2013 - 07:23 PM, said:

I hate arrogance like this, suggesting mankind is the pinnacle of scientific advancement. Chances are alien life is much more advanced than us, why would they want to make contact with a baby civilisation? We abuse each other, the planet and the wildlife - we probably look far too primitive for an alien civilisation to be interested in making contact.

I NVR SAID WE WERE THE PINNACLE........WE DEFINE LIVING...NO WONDER WE HAVNT FOUND ANYTHING ELSE "LIVING" BEYOND THIS PLANET AND OUR MINDS AND NVR WILL.....EVERYTHIG THAT IS "LIVING" IS ON THIS PLANET

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#152    Swede

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 01:12 PM

View PostMR.Blueprint, on 01 April 2013 - 12:22 PM, said:

I DONT REMEMBER SAYING U NEED A BRAIN TO BE "ALIVE" .......HOW DO YALL KNOW THAT WE ARE EVEN "ALIVE" ?W E WILLNVR FIND ALIENS....WE WILL NVR LIVE ON ANOTHER PLANET BESIDES EARTH BECAUSE WE WASNT MENT TO. WE WILL NVR GO PAST THE MOON AS HUMANS BECAUSE WE WASNT MENT TO.....WE ARE EARTHLINGS IF U CALL WAT WE ARE... LIVING.... LIKE I SAID WE WILL NVR FIND ANYMORE EARTHLINGS OUTHERE

The quoted citations were in response to Kajiwara's initial post that stated that squid (a cephalopod) do not have brains. This is, of course, inaccurate. Kajiwara recognized the error in the original post and promptly edited accordingly.

Pay attention.

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#153    MR.Blueprint

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 01:43 PM

View PostSwede, on 01 April 2013 - 01:12 PM, said:

The quoted citations were in response to Kajiwara's initial post that stated that squid (a cephalopod) do not have brains. This is, of course, inaccurate. Kajiwara recognized the error in the original post and promptly edited accordingly.

Pay attention.

.

ok

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#154    Frank Merton

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:03 PM

The distances between stars are too great.  People greatly and utterly fail to understand this reality.

The chances of evolution of a sentient, technologically capable, intelligent species are extremely adverse.  We haven't even the slightest notion how sentience might work, so we have no notion how common it might be.

The likelihood of a species evolved as ours has surviving self-destruction long enough to get into space is too great.

Of course anything that is possible must happen given enough chances, and its a very big universe, so we may presume "they" are "out there" somewhere, but the chances that we will ever encounter them could be immeasurably small.


#155    MR.Blueprint

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:29 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 01 April 2013 - 02:03 PM, said:

The distances between stars are too great.  People greatly and utterly fail to understand this reality.

The chances of evolution of a sentient, technologically capable, intelligent species are extremely adverse.  We haven't even the slightest notion how sentience might work, so we have no notion how common it might be.

The likelihood of a species evolved as ours has surviving self-destruction long enough to get into space is too great.

Of course anything that is possible must happen given enough chances, and its a very big universe, so we may presume "they" are "out there" somewhere, but the chances that we will ever encounter them could be immeasurably small.


why do we think we are hot ****....like its the universe goal to produce something like us...

what is living is the stars and planets in the universe we are jus some fancy fungi walking around on this plant we are like parasite. I dont think its anything out there execpt for my stars and planet


stars and planets are whats alive so yes its plent of life in the universe.
but its no more bull**** like us unning around in no kind of form
we are unique its nothin out there walking, gowing, breathing or thinking

its only stars and planets out there living their cycles aka lifes

really we are the smallest forms of of life in the universe

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#156    sk8tan71

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:44 PM

Damn......I thought this thread would have been Zoser trying to prove he is an Ancient Alien.

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#157    Theater of Dreams

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 04:36 AM

This comment mosh-pit looks like damn fun. I guess I'll jump in for a little.

View PostMR.Blueprint, on 01 April 2013 - 12:22 PM, said:

I DONT REMEMBER SAYING U NEED A BRAIN TO BE "ALIVE" .......HOW DO YALL KNOW THAT WE ARE EVEN "ALIVE" ?W E WILLNVR FIND ALIENS....WE WILL NVR LIVE ON ANOTHER PLANET BESIDES EARTH BECAUSE WE WASNT MENT TO. WE WILL NVR GO PAST THE MOON AS HUMANS BECAUSE WE WASNT MENT TO.....WE ARE EARTHLINGS IF U CALL WAT WE ARE... LIVING.... LIKE I SAID WE WILL NVR FIND ANYMORE EARTHLINGS OUTHERE

I've been reading a few other of your and Arbitran's posts and responses to each other in the thread, and quite frankly, I find your sense of reasoning to be laughable, to say the least. The fact that you choose to disregard even the slightest possibility that we in some point in time will have a chance to encounter alien life, live on another planet or even fly past the moon reinforces my evaluation of your damaged sense of logic.

Why would you deny even the slightest possibility of any of the aforementioned events happening in the future? What baffles me even more is the remark where you claim that we "WASNT MENT TO." How can any one human decide what is good for their entire species? We as human have been curious throughout history and will continue to explore and discover new things on and beyond our planet, there isn't a doubt in my mind of this.

Your doubts on what we consider life are surprisingly understandable. Life is a much too complex concept to accurately define. But to say that we won't ever find life? How do you know this. Do you think that there isn't even the slightest chance? Or do you think that with the way we currently define life that we would not recognize it?

Dream Theater

#158    conspiracy buff

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 06:37 AM

When you consider how infinite the universe is and that we are but one of many solar systems, the belief that we are the only intelligent life becomes laughable and somewhat absurd.  God created many planets and solar systems and to believe that all of it is uninhabited is moronic and unrealistic at best.  I don't know if we will ever be able to go to other worlds or other solar systems.  Our knowledge of the universe is constantly being changed by space missions and satellite images.  We once thought that the Earth was the center of the universe and that the sun revolved around us.  It was once thought that the Earth was flat.  The analogy here is that we are arrogant in how we view our place in the universe.  Look at all the evidence that we've had over the last century or so with UFO sightings, abductions, etc.  To dismiss all of that is pompous and just plain wrong.  Aliens most probably do exist.  It's a matter of when we find them and not if[unless they contact us first].

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#159    Frank Merton

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 08:11 AM

If God is the creator, we need not speculate why the big universe; it could all be for our benefit -- such as to make inertia work or something like that.

If natural processes made it all, then there is no reason for it all -- it is just there automatically -- and that it is inhabited does not necessarily follow.

That we exist here is the only real fact we have.  That we got here after a long and arduous and complicated evolutionary history -- not any sort of straight line like you would expect if we were inevitable -- speaks to a strong possibility that our existence (by "our" I speak of sentient, intelligent, technological beings) is probably quite rare, if not excruciatingly rare.

We know that if something is possible (and we know we are possible) then no matter how small the odds, given enough chances, it will recur.  Fine, but we should not be making assumptions about how often this recurrence may take place, especially since we see no sign of them no matter where we look.


#160    Arbitran

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 09:20 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 01 April 2013 - 02:03 PM, said:

The distances between stars are too great.  People greatly and utterly fail to understand this reality.

The chances of evolution of a sentient, technologically capable, intelligent species are extremely adverse.  We haven't even the slightest notion how sentience might work, so we have no notion how common it might be.

The likelihood of a species evolved as ours has surviving self-destruction long enough to get into space is too great.

Of course anything that is possible must happen given enough chances, and its a very big universe, so we may presume "they" are "out there" somewhere, but the chances that we will ever encounter them could be immeasurably small.

I think virtually any scientist would disagree with just about everything you've said here (I myself am a scientist—an evolutionary biologist, mostly—though that hardly qualifies me to discuss space travel in particular, and thus I don't count myself there, though I would disagree with you on that point nonetheless, based on my limited knowledge of the subject). As I've understood it, the distances between stars, true, are far too great for our current technological limits; this is far from evidence that a more sophisticated culture and science could not surpass our limitations and succeed in interstellar travel, since nearly every scientist I know or have read agrees that there are theoretical methods of interstellar travel that we may have access to in the future, though they are beyond us currently.

In any case, speaking of evolution however—my forte—I must disagree with your second point even more strongly. The idea of life evolving on another planet, under different conditions to Earth—whether similar or totally unearthly—is not at all adverse, and in fact I would argue that it is not even particular unlikely, if not outright probable. We may not fully understand every minutia involved in the process of sentience, sapience, intelligence, etc., but undeniably they are rooted in the same fundamental principles of natural selection which granted an ecological niche to every other species on our planet. Intelligence very clearly serves as a very potent niche in an ecosystem, and allows a species possessing it to have very distinct advantages over other creatures in the same environment (and of course in our case, other environments—the global environment, in fact). Whether an intelligent species originating on another world would possess qualities of sapience, sentience, etc., comparable to our own, I cannot even begin to guess (though it is not unreasonable to think that aspects of emotion, etc., serve valuable ecological needs as well); perhaps an alien species would possess something very much like our sentience or sapience, but very slightly different, perhaps something unfound on Earth, perhaps inconceivable to the human brain. It's all very speculative, but it cannot be denied that since biology is squarely grounded in evolution via natural selection, whether the species is carbon-based, silicon-based, or whether it is even organic and 'biological' in the classic sense at all, the same rules universally apply, and do allow us to make at least reasonably-educated predictions as to the sorts of things that might be out there. Of course we can't simply dream up a species and say it exists somewhere, but we can say that, in principle, in theory, it is biologically feasible, and thus something sharing similar traits could possibly exist, somewhere.

And as for the chances of encountering an alien culture, I cannot possibly say, apart from the fact that given life's resilience, adaptability, and—again—the value of intelligence as an evolutionary benefit, I would not be at all surprised if our galaxy was populated with a reasonable number of civilizations, perhaps some still primitive, perhaps some far surpassing us, traversing the stars, and perhaps some not terribly dissimilar from our own present state; again, I cannot say for certain, any more than anybody can, but speaking strictly from a biological point of view, it would not surprise me at all. On the contrary, an infinitely more remarkable and unexpected discovery would be if we were alone in the universe—nay, even our own galaxy. That would be an astounding and virtually inexplicable discovery indeed.

Try to realize it's all within yourself / No-one else can make you change / And to see you're really only very small / And life flows on within you and without you. / We were talking about the love that's gone so cold and the people / Who gain the world and lose their soul / They don't know they can't see are you one of them? / When you've seen beyond yourself then you may find peace of mind / Is waiting there / And the time will come / when you see we're all one and life flows on within you and without you. ~ George Harrison

#161    Sheep Smart

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 10:24 AM

View Postcsspwns, on 08 July 2012 - 04:47 AM, said:

the intelligent aliens out there (if there are any) would probably have intelligence around our level or they would have contacted us by now. either tat or their shy or maybe even hostile and planning to atk us when we are at our weakest meh.

I hope they could sure as hell spell a lot better.

And I hope their canned ham is rejected by diners throughout the universe.
Cause you know we got thee best.

Other life in the universe?, you dare to imply there are entities possibly far greater than us almighty humans, creators of canned ham and reality tv. Nonsense. Absurd.

   The reality that stupidy exists in abundance doesnt bother me. Its the fact that theres still no cure.

#162    Sheep Smart

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 10:38 AM

View PostArbitran, on 21 May 2013 - 09:20 AM, said:



I think virtually any scientist would disagree with just about everything you've said here (I myself am a scientist—an evolutionary biologist, mostly—though that hardly qualifies me to discuss space travel in particular, and thus I don't count myself there, though I would disagree with you on that point nonetheless, based on my limited knowledge of the subject). As I've understood it, the distances between stars, true, are far too great for our current technological limits; this is far from evidence that a more sophisticated culture and science could not surpass our limitations and succeed in interstellar travel, since nearly every scientist I know or have read agrees that there are theoretical methods of interstellar travel that we may have access to in the future, though they are beyond us currently.

In any case, speaking of evolution however—my forte—I must disagree with your second point even more strongly. The idea of life evolving on another planet, under different conditions to Earth—whether similar or totally unearthly—is not at all adverse, and in fact I would argue that it is not even particular unlikely, if not outright probable. We may not fully understand every minutia involved in the process of sentience, sapience, intelligence, etc., but undeniably they are rooted in the same fundamental principles of natural selection which granted an ecological niche to every other species on our planet. Intelligence very clearly serves as a very potent niche in an ecosystem, and allows a species possessing it to have very distinct advantages over other creatures in the same environment (and of course in our case, other environments—the global environment, in fact). Whether an intelligent species originating on another world would possess qualities of sapience, sentience, etc., comparable to our own, I cannot even begin to guess (though it is not unreasonable to think that aspects of emotion, etc., serve valuable ecological needs as well); perhaps an alien species would possess something very much like our sentience or sapience, but very slightly different, perhaps something unfound on Earth, perhaps inconceivable to the human brain. It's all very speculative, but it cannot be denied that since biology is squarely grounded in evolution via natural selection, whether the species is carbon-based, silicon-based, or whether it is even organic and 'biological' in the classic sense at all, the same rules universally apply, and do allow us to make at least reasonably-educated predictions as to the sorts of things that might be out there. Of course we can't simply dream up a species and say it exists somewhere, but we can say that, in principle, in theory, it is biologically feasible, and thus something sharing similar traits could possibly exist, somewhere.

And as for the chances of encountering an alien culture, I cannot possibly say, apart from the fact that given life's resilience, adaptability, and—again—the value of intelligence as an evolutionary benefit, I would not be at all surprised if our galaxy was populated with a reasonable number of civilizations, perhaps some still primitive, perhaps some far surpassing us, traversing the stars, and perhaps some not terribly dissimilar from our own present state; again, I cannot say for certain, any more than anybody can, but speaking strictly from a biological point of view, it would not surprise me at all. On the contrary, an infinitely more remarkable and unexpected discovery would be if we were alone in the universe—nay, even our own galaxy. That would be an astounding and virtually inexplicable discovery indeed.

Somewhere out there in the vast cyber universe theres a superiority that has made its presense right here.
In all due respect, This is the absolute best answer one could validate in regards to a thread that id probably look over due to the OP's ignorance on behalf of a subject that is infinite in both thought and perspective. Hence the sarcasm just above this post.

Needless to say, I could not agree more.

Other life in the universe?, you dare to imply there are entities possibly far greater than us almighty humans, creators of canned ham and reality tv. Nonsense. Absurd.

   The reality that stupidy exists in abundance doesnt bother me. Its the fact that theres still no cure.

#163    jaylemurph

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 05:44 PM

View PostSheep Smart, on 21 May 2013 - 10:24 AM, said:

I hope they could sure as hell spell a lot better.

And I hope their canned ham is rejected by diners throughout the universe.
Cause you know we got thee best.

Your sense of irony is scintillating.

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#164    Sheep Smart

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 02:09 AM


-

Quote

Your sense of irony is scintillating.--Jaylemurph 
Oh really, and why is that?



Quote

When you consider how infinite the universe is and that we are but one of many solar systems, the belief that we are the only intelligent life becomes laughable and somewhat absurd.  God created many planets and solar systems and to believe that all of it is uninhabited is moronic and unrealistic at best.  I don't know if we will ever be able to go to other worlds or other solar systems.  Our knowledge of the universe is constantly being changed by space missions and satellite images.  We once thought that the Earth was the center of the universe and that the sun revolved around us.  It was once thought that the Earth was flat.  The analogy here is that we are arrogant in how we view our place in the universe.  Look at all the evidence that we've had over the last century or so with UFO sightings, abductions, etc.  To dismiss all of that is pompous and just plain wrong.  Aliens most probably do exist.  It's a matter of when we find them and not if[unless they contact us first].

I agree but I believe there is an overwhelming amount of testimony which even if 1% of the millions of sightings is viable evidence which I absolutely believe it is, that to me stands as proof.
And any lifeform that makes it here before we make it there is no doubt obviously more intelligent than us.

Were smart but were a long way off from being THAT smart. After all resorting to war is undeniably idiotic. Its down the same path that leads to destruction.
Its no wonder that extraterrestrials havent bothered with full contact.
Even if they are responsible for crop circles as an authentic form of attemped communication , I can only imagine the looks on their faces watching how we seem to handle the phenomena within ourselves. Not to mention all the millions of witnessed sightings we claim are nothing more than illusions. Weve got to grow up already.

Edited by Sheep Smart, 22 May 2013 - 02:18 AM.

Other life in the universe?, you dare to imply there are entities possibly far greater than us almighty humans, creators of canned ham and reality tv. Nonsense. Absurd.

   The reality that stupidy exists in abundance doesnt bother me. Its the fact that theres still no cure.

#165    third_eye

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 03:35 AM

Sometimes I am tempted to believe that the reason that extra terrestrial visitations are undetected is because they are unable to lower their intelligence to the levels comprehensible to the state that is the intelligence of our modern civillisation.

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