Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Hearing the Voice of God


  • Please log in to reply
47 replies to this topic

#31    eight bits

eight bits

    ...

  • Member
  • 7,628 posts
  • Joined:24 May 2007

Posted 15 July 2012 - 06:19 AM

Shabd Mystic

Quote

History's great mystics, including Jesus Himself, have taught that many things can be seen or heard that mimic God and are anything but.

Apparently, anti-mystics as well. The Vineyard Movement, whose members are the subject of Luhrmann's study, come into tremendous criticism from more conservative Protestants. Part of the critique turns on whether charisms are truly Biblical, and almost amusingly, if bigotry can be amusing, whether they are "too Catholic." But another part concerns "opening oneelf up" to ungodly beings. That part sounds much like the pious case against Ouija boards.

The Vineyard Movement itself split over something called "The Toronto Blessing." One of the Vimeyard churches, Toronto Airport, found that laughing fits among the congregants were a manifestation of the Holy Spirit. When laughter became "animal noises," more conservative Vineyardists encouraged the Toronto church to go its own way.

So, it seems that there may be a real problem identifying the source of things. Also, I think the Toronto Blessing story illustrates that when you unleash what is hidden within, you may be surprised with what comes up.

I look at things from a Jungian perspective. It's all unconscious contents as far as I am concerned. The problem is how to allow contents to enter consciousness without overwhelming consciousness, and to get all aspects of the self working together harmoniously and fruitfully.

Quote

It's the human ego that lets us believe that "I" am even worthy of such things that allows us to be so taken in.

Ego inflation (searchable) is a definite danger among people who make progress in exploring the unconscious contents. The source of difficulty isn't so much a pre-existing concept of self-worth, but rather the interpretation of experience, experience which is, after all, a reason to think that the consciousness is "special," not only when compared with other people, but also among the functions of the mind and self.

Inflation is another way in which consciousness can be overwhelmed by this stuff, subtler than be being rendered incoherent and bewildered (like a 60's stoner on an acid trip), but dysfunctional all the same.
-

Edited by eight bits, 15 July 2012 - 06:20 AM.

Posted Image

#32    Shabd Mystic

Shabd Mystic

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 480 posts
  • Joined:01 Jan 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Jacksonville, FL

  • "Religion is to mysticism what popularization is to science." ~ Henri Bergson

Posted 16 July 2012 - 03:51 AM

View Posteight bits, on 15 July 2012 - 06:19 AM, said:

So, it seems that there may be a real problem identifying the source of things.

Which is the point I was making exactly.


View Posteight bits, on 15 July 2012 - 06:19 AM, said:

Ego inflation (searchable) is a definite danger among people who make progress in exploring the unconscious contents. The source of difficulty isn't so much a pre-existing concept of self-worth, but rather the interpretation of experience, experience which is, after all, a reason to think that the consciousness is "special," not only when compared with other people, but also among the functions of the mind and self.

Inflation is another way in which consciousness can be overwhelmed by this stuff, subtler than be being rendered incoherent and bewildered (like a 60's stoner on an acid trip), but dysfunctional all the same.
-


Ego inflation is a huge problem on mystical paths, especially those of a lower order (Adi Da and Osho are prime examples). Since you recommended a Google search, I will return the favor, check out "Sri Aurobindo, the intermediate zone" (without the paranthesis). Or read it here:

Sri Aurobindo's Letters on Yoga - The Intermediate Zone

It's a great read and written from actual experience and not at all "imagination." Countless mystic now and throughout history have experienced the same thtings he describes.

In one part he says:

The sadhak thinks that he is no longer in the old small consciousness at all, because he feels in contact with something larger or more powerful, and yet the old consciousness is still there, not really abolished. He feels the control or influence of some Power, Being or Force greater than himself, aspires to be its instrument and thinks he has got rid of ego; but this delusion of egolessness often covers an exaggerated ego.


The ultimate goal of true mysticism to to kill the ego. The ego is what stands between you and God and mysticism seeks to destroy that.

.

Edited by Shabd Mystic, 16 July 2012 - 04:07 AM.


#33    Artaxerxes

Artaxerxes

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 305 posts
  • Joined:10 Jul 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tennessee, United States

Posted 16 July 2012 - 04:09 AM

I know you won't believe me but one time when I was standing in our kitchen I heard a voice in my head tell me that my wife was fixing to walk in to the kitchen and say "thanks for going with me."   About a minute after I heard that voice tell me that my wife walked in and said those exact same words.  I had gone to meeting in town with her which was 45 minutes away and she didn't say "thanks for going with me" till we got back and that voice told me she was fixing to do that.  

A friend of mine at church, Cecil, who is now a 71 year old man told me a story about hearing a voice say to him "Run Cecil Run!"   When Cecil was a teenager he was standing in a field and a big thunderstorm came up.  There was one big tree in the field and Cecil went and got under it to keep from getting wet.  He told me he heard a voice say to him "Run Cecil Run!" but the first time he heard it wasn't as loud, and he just stood there under the tree. The second time he heard the voice it was a little louder and it said "run cecil run!"  And finally the third time the voice was insistent and loud and it said "RUN CECIL RUN!"   So he finally took off running and when he got away from the tree a bit a big giant bolt of lightening struck the tree and Cecil told me if he'd been under that tree he would have been killed.


#34    Shabd Mystic

Shabd Mystic

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 480 posts
  • Joined:01 Jan 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Jacksonville, FL

  • "Religion is to mysticism what popularization is to science." ~ Henri Bergson

Posted 16 July 2012 - 04:24 AM

More about the ego and mysticism:

Quote

Paul Brunton taught that between the state of ordinary man and the state of the matured mystic lies a perilous and deceptive region known as the astral plane, the intermediate zone, the hall of illusion, and so on, which spiritual aspirants can reach through concentration, meditation, self-conquest, and study. Brunton asserted that the danger is that once there, then their egoism becomes stimulated by the subtle forces they have evoked, their emotional nature becomes more sensitive and more fluid, their imaginative power becomes more active and is less restrained, and if they then fall victim to spiritual error regarding their state, the result is swollen vanity, superstitious credulity, emotions run riot, and wild imagination. He considered this a major factor in explaining the human wreckage found on the spiritual path.

Quote




#35    Artaxerxes

Artaxerxes

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 305 posts
  • Joined:10 Jul 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tennessee, United States

Posted 16 July 2012 - 04:27 AM

"I don't hear anything."  - Zarakitty


It's got to be quiet.  No noise, no music, no TV, no cars, etc. Quiet.  The times when I've had the most transcendental experiences are when I was zoning out, not really thinking about anything.  When I heard that voice tell me what my wife was fixing to say I was in the kitchen washing dishes, staring out the window, sort of zoning out, staring out into the woods.  

If your mind is always full of "this world" it's kind of difficult to listen to anything coming through from the other world.   This world is loud and easily drowns out information coming from the other side.  Repetitive tasks where you do the same thing over and over again, where you don't really have to think, are excellent for helping one have spiritual experiences.


#36    eight bits

eight bits

    ...

  • Member
  • 7,628 posts
  • Joined:24 May 2007

Posted 17 July 2012 - 12:31 AM

Shabd Mystic


We seem to be in agreement that people who mess around inside their heads might end up thinking more highly of themselves than is warranted. I stuck the note about being  "seacrhable" onto the term ego inflation because it really is a specific term with a specific meaning, as opposed to some descriptive phrase I happened to cook up for the occasion.

I don't see any attraction in killing the ego, at least not as Jungians use the word. I'm not even sure it is possible in a living human being, except temporarily, and it will grow back. Jungians  think a strong ego is a component of mental health, although "strength" is a tricky term to define.

I came across an interesting heuristic proposed by Marie-Louise von Franz, Jung's chief disciple. She noted that other people are annoyed both by inflated egos (I think it's pretty obvious how that would be so), but also annoyed by too much dininished ones as well. So, she thinks if your egotism isn't annoying to others around you, you could be doing it right.

Jungians are Goldilockseans: for almost anything, they seek not too much one way, and not too much the other way, but instead, something just right.

Artaxerxes

Quote

It's got to be quiet

Cecil wasn't being quiet.

Quiet is good once in a while, and it's nice to have an "apophatic" break between "everyday life" and turning inward. But as it says in the OP's piece (and in the blog thing I posed), the style of prayer (or whatever you do when you address Leland Stanford, Jr.) that gets results for the people in the article is "kataphatic." That's not necessarily all that quiet. The Vineyard Movement's transitional exercise (what separates the sacred from the mudane) appears to be a coffee klatch.

It comes when it comes, I think.

Posted Image

#37    Shabd Mystic

Shabd Mystic

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 480 posts
  • Joined:01 Jan 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Jacksonville, FL

  • "Religion is to mysticism what popularization is to science." ~ Henri Bergson

Posted 18 July 2012 - 03:01 AM

View Posteight bits, on 17 July 2012 - 12:31 AM, said:

I don't see any attraction in killing the ego, at least not as Jungians use the word. I'm not even sure it is possible in a living human being, except temporarily, and it will grow back. Jungians  think a strong ego is a component of mental health, although "strength" is a tricky term to define.

I came across an interesting heuristic proposed by Marie-Louise von Franz, Jung's chief disciple. She noted that other people are annoyed both by inflated egos (I think it's pretty obvious how that would be so), but also annoyed by too much dininished ones as well. So, she thinks if your egotism isn't annoying to others around you, you could be doing it right.

Jungians are Goldilockseans: for almost anything, they seek not too much one way, and not too much the other way, but instead, something just right.

I don't want to get into all this again as I cover this extensively in an older thread, but I will instead just post a few (very few) quotes about this from my vast collection of material on this subject (about how eliminating the ego is the ultimate goal of any 'true" mysticism):

"Real rebirth is dying from the ego into the spirit." ~ Ramana Maharshi

"In Kali Yuga communion with the Sound is the only true devotion by which to
achieve liberation from ego."
~ Guru Amardas

"The pathway to heaven is narrow indeed,
Its breadth is the tenth of a mustard seed;
The elephant cannot through it pass,
For ego bars the gate, alas!"
~ Nanak

"The lover is converted into the Beloved. That indeed is called true love.
Forgetting his own ego, he remains absorbed in the One." ~ Dadu Dayal

"The invisible is inside but is not seen,
Because of the separating wall of egotism."
~ Guru Arjan

"The foundation of the Buddha's teachings lies in compassion, and the reason for
practicing the teachings is to wipe out the persistence of ego, the number-one
enemy of compassion." ~ Tenzin Gyatso, The 14th Dalai Lama

"See who is the doubter, who is the thinker. It is the ego. Hold it; the other
thoughts will die away - the ego will be left pure. See the source from where
the ego arises and abide in it. That is pure consciousness." ~ Ramana Maharshi

"Renounce thou thy ego
And turn thou into dust
And on thy body let the grass grow
If in the radiance of thy Master
Thou dost turn into ashes,
These ashes would be an alchemy
That would transmute thee into gold."
~ Shams-i-Tabriz

"In the body floweth the Pool of Immortality,
By drinking its nectar thou dost lose egoity
And birth and rebirth do for ever cease."
~ Namdev

"There are numerous sidetracks which lead to a distorted ego-centered version of
spirituality; we can deceive ourselves into thinking we are developing
spiritually when instead we are strengthening our egocentricity through
spiritual techniques."
~ Chögyam Trungpa

"The source of wisdom and power, of love and beauty, is within ourselves, but
not within our egos. It is within our consciousness. Indeed, its presence
provides us with a conscious contrast which enables us to speak of the ego as if
it were something different and apart: it is the true Self whereas the ego is
only an illusion of the mind." ~ Paul Brunton

"Give up egotism, efface the distinction of 'mine' and 'thine', and be humble
and discriminating like a little ant. Then alone shalt thou be able to pick up
and eat the sweet grains of sugar out of the dirt of the world."
~ Vani of Sant Ravidas

"The lover is converted into the Beloved. That indeed is called true love.
Forgetting his own ego, he remains absorbed in the One." ~ Dadu Dayal

"Standing on the bare ground, — my head bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted
into infinite space, — all mean egotism vanishes. I become a transparent
eye-ball; I am nothing; I see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate
through me; I am part or particle of God." ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You learn sooner or later that you are not running the show and that if you
relax, the show runs better. Things will happen better if you just relax; many
things are under control in many respects. You quit and things happen, you let
the door open, you stop the obstructing, you eliminate the ego. The ego is one
of the biggest obstructions to the achievement of anything." ~ Richard Rose

"The ego constantly competes with the spirit for control over your inner voice."
~ Darren L. Johnson

"Ego is to the true self what a flashlight is to a spotlight." ~ John Bradshaw

"With the disappearance of God the Ego moves forward to become the sole
divinity." ~ Dorothee Sölle

"If you want to reach a state of bliss, then go beyond your ego and the internal
dialogue. Make a decision to relinquish the need to control, the need to be
approved, and the need to judge. Those are the three things the ego is doing all
the time. It's very important to be aware of them every time they come up." ~
Deepak Chopra

"Enlightenment is ego's ultimate disappointment." ~ Chögyam Trungpa

"The mystical notion ... is that your deepest Self transcends both good and bad,
so by accepting absolutely everything that happens to you - by equally embracing
both good and bad with equanimity - you can transcend the ego altogether. The
idea is not to have one thing that is good smash into another thing called my
ego but to simply rise above both." ~ Ken Wilber

"Everything that intrudes upon the mental stillness in this highly critical
stage must be rejected, no matter how virtuous or how "spiritual" a face it puts
on. Only by the lapse of all thought, by the loss of all thinking capacity can
he maintain this rigid stillness as it should be maintained. It is here alone
that the last great battle will be fought and that the first great fulfillment
will be achieved. That battle will be the one which will give the final
deathblow to the ego; that fulfillment will be the union with the Overself after
the ego's death. Both the battle and the fulfillment must take place within the
stillness; they must not be a merely intellectual matter of thought alone nor a
merely emotional matter of feeling alone. Here in the stillness both thought and
emotion must die and the ego will then lose their powerful support. Therefore
here alone it is possible to tackle the ego with any possibility of victory."
~ Paul Brunton


View Posteight bits, on 17 July 2012 - 12:31 AM, said:

I came across an interesting heuristic proposed by Marie-Louise von Franz, Jung's chief disciple. She noted that other people are annoyed both by inflated egos (I think it's pretty obvious how that would be so), but also annoyed by too much dininished ones as well. So, she thinks if your egotism isn't annoying to others around you, you could be doing it right.

Jungians are Goldilockseans: for almost anything, they seek not too much one way, and not too much the other way, but instead, something just right.


Carl Jung was at the very most a "beginner" as a mystic and he was barely cracking the surface when he died. I enjoy his work (have you yet looked at "The Red Book?") but he is a lightweight in terms of his knowledge about mysticism.


#38    Avatar Samantha Ai

Avatar Samantha Ai

    WE DO LOVE YOU

  • Member
  • 3,746 posts
  • Joined:27 May 2011
  • Location:Texas

  • It seems so important now but you will get over.
    -AF

Posted 18 July 2012 - 07:21 AM

double

Edited by Lookitisoneofthosepeople, 18 July 2012 - 07:38 AM.


#39    Avatar Samantha Ai

Avatar Samantha Ai

    WE DO LOVE YOU

  • Member
  • 3,746 posts
  • Joined:27 May 2011
  • Location:Texas

  • It seems so important now but you will get over.
    -AF

Posted 18 July 2012 - 07:21 AM

Eastern societies by default are more cohesive with emphasis on the group and not the individual. The West is not as collective as focuses on the self.

Of course the philosophies will differ. We can learn from both.

I don't see a need for dueling mystics or rejecting either view. Even claiming Jung was a mystic is a debate in itself.

Jung does make scientific attempt to understand and explain mysticism and not just partake in it. Whatever elements I find on my path, whatever practices I incorporate, I want to know how it works, where it came from, and to understand not just from the inside as a practitioner but from outside as well with an academic understanding.

Of course Jungian concepts have more to offer me at this stage, I just don't see a need to negatively compare.

Edited by Lookitisoneofthosepeople, 18 July 2012 - 07:41 AM.


#40    eight bits

eight bits

    ...

  • Member
  • 7,628 posts
  • Joined:24 May 2007

Posted 18 July 2012 - 08:35 AM

Shabd Mystic

Quote

Carl Jung was at the very most a "beginner" as a mystic and he was barely cracking the surface when he died. I enjoy his work (have you yet looked at "The Red Book?") but he is a lightweight in terms of his knowledge about mysticism.

Yes, I was an early reader of the fasimile edition of the Red Book, and my current avatar is a detail from one of Jung's paintings there.

It is a less charming feature of discussions which concern personal opinions, when one person comments adversely on the person of someone who holds a different opinion. There is some further irony when the point of the comment is the need to get beyond ego.

I disagree with you about the ego, perhaps because we appear to be discussing different things. I also believe that the point of mysticism is to learn from personal experience, not to build a wall of quotes from other people. I would be happy to discuss the ego with you, but if you'd rather not discuss that at this time, then you need only say so.

Look, this is your thread. Your OP, in its entirety, is a link to a profile of an anthropologist who also researches psychology. Her subjects use techniques made accessible in their culture,  my culture, by Jung, a psychologist who also  researched anthropology.

Jung is on-topic here, and has contributed to the specific concerns that were covered in the Stanford article. Jung was doing this before the subject of the profile was born. Jung had done it before David-Neal thought to try.

Jung knew that he wasn't the first in the world. He had met and conferred with William James, who had surveyed world mystical experience. Jung was also well versed in comparative religion. We seemed to be nearly in agreement that interpretation of these expereinces is fraught. It seems odd to dismiss the perspective of a scholar of Jung's stature and accomplishment.


Look, etc.

Quote

I just don't see a need to negatively compare.

It's a web thing :) . To cite Deepak Chopra with reverence and then describe Carl Jung as a "lightweight" speaks for itself. Some negative comparisons happen just by laying two authors side by side. It can't be helped.

Posted Image

#41    Shabd Mystic

Shabd Mystic

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 480 posts
  • Joined:01 Jan 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Jacksonville, FL

  • "Religion is to mysticism what popularization is to science." ~ Henri Bergson

Posted 18 July 2012 - 11:29 PM

View PostLookitisoneofthosepeople, on 18 July 2012 - 07:21 AM, said:

I don't see a need for dueling mystics or rejecting either view. Even claiming Jung was a mystic is a debate in itself.


A mystic is one who practices mysticism. It doesn't mean that you have attained any particular "level." There really is no debate about Jung's mysticism, only about how far he went with it.

View PostLookitisoneofthosepeople, on 18 July 2012 - 07:21 AM, said:

Of course Jungian concepts have more to offer me at this stage, I just don't see a need to negatively compare.

Good point. Jung is a good place to start. When, and if, you ever move past that stage then you will come to see Jung in a much different light. I shouldn't have "jumped ahead." I wasn't trying to belittel him at all. I like Jung very much. I was just trying to help you, not to attack Jung.


.


#42    pbarosso

pbarosso

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Joined:16 Sep 2005

Posted 18 July 2012 - 11:51 PM

you cannot just set out to hear the voice of God, or you will never hear it. it is a vain attempt to do so this way. you have to not anticipate it and pray out of selflessness...that "to hear a voice" cannot be your goal or it will not present it.

when you hear it you will know. i heard it 4 times. there is no question of its origin. you KNOW. thats all i can say about that.

the pursuit of knowledge will force you to pick a side. Choose wisely.
                                                --me

#43    Shabd Mystic

Shabd Mystic

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 480 posts
  • Joined:01 Jan 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Jacksonville, FL

  • "Religion is to mysticism what popularization is to science." ~ Henri Bergson

Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:08 AM

View Posteight bits, on 18 July 2012 - 08:35 AM, said:

It is a less charming feature of discussions which concern personal opinions, when one person comments adversely on the person of someone who holds a different opinion.

That's funny. It is a less charming feature of discussions when someone else ascribes false personal motives to someone who shares something he doesn't like to hear. If I say that a first-grader is not as knowlegable as Albert Einstein that would be me merely stating a fact. But to that child's father it would probably be seen as some sort of 'personal attack" or that someone "comments adversely."


View Posteight bits, on 18 July 2012 - 08:35 AM, said:

There is some further irony when the point of the comment is the need to get beyond ego.


The only thing even remotely related in any way to the term "ironic" is that you believe that because someone posts something about ego that he believes he himself is in any way egoless. Or that you fail to see that your own need to attack, no matter how "subtle" you try to make it, is just dripping with ego.


View Posteight bits, on 18 July 2012 - 08:35 AM, said:

I also believe that the point of mysticism is to learn from personal experience, not to build a wall of quotes from other people.


A wall of quotes was used to make the point very clear. It obviously wasn't adequate for you because all these people weren't well known enough for you or accomplished enough for you. What do they know? Certainly not as much as you. No ego there ...

Evidently it would have been much better had I just stated what "I" believed. After all, I am so well known as an authority on this subject under my false name of "Shabd Mystic."




View Posteight bits, on 18 July 2012 - 08:35 AM, said:

I would be happy to discuss the ego with you, but if you'd rather not discuss that at this time, then you need only say so.


I have no interest in a discussion because it is clear that this is merely a debate for you. It's an ego game. It's about "being right."

I have no desire for any of that. You made a couple statements and I have extensive personal experience in this area and knew those statements to be false. I was just trying to help you see the tuth. If you want to blow away what I said and cling to your own beliefs have at it. I don't benefit in any way from whatever you choose to believe. I was only trying to help you believe the truth instead of some false opinions.

The quotes obiously were worthless and so I'm glad I didn't waste my time posting 100 more.




View Posteight bits, on 18 July 2012 - 08:35 AM, said:

Look, this is your thread. Your OP, in its entirety, is a link to a profile of an anthropologist who also researches psychology. Her subjects use techniques made accessible in their culture,  my culture, by Jung, a psychologist who also  researched anthropology.

My linking to the article wasn't any kind of endorsement of what it said. I read it and knew some people here would enjoy reading it and discussing it so I posted it. I disagree with some of it. It wasn't put here to try to push my beliefs or knowledge on anyone.


View Posteight bits, on 18 July 2012 - 08:35 AM, said:

Jung is on-topic here, and has contributed to the specific concerns that were covered in the Stanford article. Jung was doing this before the subject of the profile was born. Jung had done it before David-Neal thought to try.

Jung knew that he wasn't the first in the world. He had met and conferred with William James, who had surveyed world mystical experience. Jung was also well versed in comparative religion. We seemed to be nearly in agreement that interpretation of these expereinces is fraught. It seems odd to dismiss the perspective of a scholar of Jung's stature and accomplishment.



All I dismissed was Jungs views on mysticism. I dismissed them because I, personally, KNOW many of them were wrong. I don't "think" they were wrong. I know it. Not from reading about mysticism but by living it.

I wouldn't say that about Jung's ideas about psychology because he knew 1,000 times more than I do about that subject. But I will argue his ideas about mysticism because I know much more about that than he did. And he was a "lightweight" on a mystical scale. He was just starting to learn. What he accomplished was great, but he had just broken the surface.


View Posteight bits, on 18 July 2012 - 08:35 AM, said:

It's a web thing :) . To cite Deepak Chopra with reverence and then describe Carl Jung as a "lightweight" speaks for itself.


Deepak Chopra is a clown. So are some others I listed like Paul Brunton, Ken Wilber and others. I listed their quotes because you showed me such limited knowledge of mysticism in holding up Jung's views as anything besides "interesting" that I figured you might be the type who would appreciate such people.

I was trying to get you t understand what they said, not be impressed with who said it. You are a great example of the "Internet ego" that pervades message boards like this. We could be in a discussion about physics and if I wrote that Madonna once said "E = MC-squared" you would be on here bashing me for quoting Madonna instead of arguing what she said and trying to prove it wrong.

That's a child ego game played by Internet message board people who care only about "being right." In your case you ignore some of the world's most famous and revered mystics all saying the same thing and point out that I quoted one guy you don't like. You think that somehow makes you appear "right" and appear smart and you completely fail to realize what it actually shows everyone about you.

To throw that at me and try to insult me with it is hilarious. I'm done playing your ego games but I appreciate you helping to redefine the term "lightweight." Thanks.  :D



.


#44    Shabd Mystic

Shabd Mystic

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 480 posts
  • Joined:01 Jan 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Jacksonville, FL

  • "Religion is to mysticism what popularization is to science." ~ Henri Bergson

Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:10 AM

View Postpbarosso, on 18 July 2012 - 11:51 PM, said:

you cannot just set out to hear the voice of God, or you will never hear it. it is a vain attempt to do so this way. you have to not anticipate it and pray out of selflessness...that "to hear a voice" cannot be your goal or it will not present it.

when you hear it you will know. i heard it 4 times. there is no question of its origin. you KNOW. thats all i can say about that.


The mind is an amazing thing.


#45    Avatar Samantha Ai

Avatar Samantha Ai

    WE DO LOVE YOU

  • Member
  • 3,746 posts
  • Joined:27 May 2011
  • Location:Texas

  • It seems so important now but you will get over.
    -AF

Posted 19 July 2012 - 06:48 AM

I think everyone has their ego on display including eight bits but his, as seen here, is so much smaller than most people's. You even characterized his attack as "subtle" while your attacks in my view were (past tense) very overt and excessive. I've learned so much from him. Usually he shares so much knowledge which is interesting and allows understanding.

The difference is that his knowledge, at least what he chooses to share, is based on the ideas of the collective, consensus, while mysticism is highly esoteric and based on personal revelation which doesn't translate as well to the collective. Personal insights are hard to impress on others.

Since mysticism deals with what is not on the surface we can expect most to not involve themselves. The mystic is not better than others. The knowledge gained is personal and won't work for the masses and not because they are defected or unwilling but it just isn't part of their framework.

I learned today that the group tends to attack the individual or sese of individuality. It is not good versus evil but simply the fact that the collective/impersonal is opposite of the individual/personal.

Being a lightweight mystic is no insult. A better gauge is how many can we help in small ways. Some have a want to help others in grand ways but a want doesn't translate into results. Even the greatest aspiration to help others pales in comparison to the smallest actions that others with less knowledge do that actually do help.

We simply cannot have everyone understand what we do as we do. It does not make us smarter and them dumber. That is an illusion. I simply do not think there is a need for "mine is better than yours" when we can learn from all.

Edited by Lookitisoneofthosepeople, 19 July 2012 - 07:44 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users