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What if Apollo 11 had been stranded ? [merged]

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#46    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 07:47 PM

What are the chances of this site ever having a serious discussion about Apollo without someone hijacking it and turning it into yet another hoax theory thread?

The actual subject being discussed is rather interesting, so can we please ignore the hoax believers, they, after all, have the conspiracies forum to expound their beliefs. Let's get back on topic.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#47    DONTEATUS

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 09:23 PM

Waspie is right on as always !
Lets see If we can think of the things NASA would do to rescue say the Teams on the ISS ?
As far as future missions ect, Sir Richard Branson`s, Virgin`s Galaytic, Space -X ect co`s that are in process of stepping into the Fray !
I think all of these teams have more than exploried the needs of recovery,
When the day comes again we return to true Space Travel mark your words there will be plans set foruth to minimize the risk.
But The Entire Gammit of Space Travel in ts slef is the Most Dangerous missions we do ,next comes really Deep Sea exploration.
My money would be on Go for it  ! You only Live to See the unknown Once ! The Luckie and well Planned Maybe get to Go a few times
Then we all Die. The ones that die that can say I saw it are the Winners !

Edited by DONTEATUS, 27 July 2012 - 09:23 PM.

This is a Work in Progress!

#48    Hawkin

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 10:44 PM

I never really gave it any thought about the astronaunts getting stranded until I read the article. And the speech that was prepared just in case.
The only thing that made me wonder is if the rocket might explode on the pad and killing the astronaunts.

It's good to have some skepticism so you won't be gullible & naïve. But to much of it can make you arrogant & egotistical.

#49    MID

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 01:06 AM

View PostRyegrog, on 27 July 2012 - 10:44 PM, said:

I never really gave it any thought about the astronaunts getting stranded until I read the article. And the speech that was prepared just in case.
The only thing that made me wonder is if the rocket might explode on the pad and killing the astronaunts.

Prior to launch or during?
W ith 14 successful manned launches on the books prior to Apollo 11, what would give you the idea that the 4th manned Saturn V launch would produce such an occurrance?

Edited by MID, 28 July 2012 - 01:08 AM.


#50    brizink

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 08:15 AM

Apollo 11 crew would have surely died. end of thread


#51    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 08:59 AM

View PostMID, on 28 July 2012 - 01:06 AM, said:

W ith 14 successful manned launches on the books prior to Apollo 11, what would give you the idea that the 4th manned Saturn V launch would produce such an occurrance?

I think that is a tad unfair MID, after all the shuttle had 24 successful launches before undergoing a catastrophic launch accident.

The important difference, of course, is that Apollo had a launch escape system which could pull the crew to safety in the event of an accident on the pad or in the first few minutes of flight.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#52    MID

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 05:14 PM

View Postbrizink, on 28 July 2012 - 08:15 AM, said:

Apollo 11 crew would have surely died. end of thread

Let's be accurate:

If Eagle was stranded on the Moon, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin would've perished.
Mike Collins would've had the impossibly difficult  task of returning to Earth alone, without his comerades, leaving their bodies on the lunar surface.


#53    MID

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 05:35 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 28 July 2012 - 08:59 AM, said:

I think that is a tad unfair MID, after all the shuttle had 24 successful launches before undergoing a catastrophic launch accident.

Yes, Waspie.  I recall.
But that was an in flight incident...
I was getting more to theposter's  idea of an explosion on the launch pad. Maybe I'm being too picky.


Quote

The important difference, of course, is that Apollo had a launch escape system which could pull the crew to safety in the event of an accident on the pad or in the first few minutes of flight.


Indeed, and that worked automatically (in a small fraction  of a second upon detecting a catastrophic potential) or manually.

I am more or less trying to get into the logic which was behind the statemenrt about the fatal launch pad explosion potential...

Edited by MID, 28 July 2012 - 05:37 PM.


#54    Hawkin

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 02:49 AM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 28 July 2012 - 08:59 AM, said:

I think that is a tad unfair MID, after all the shuttle had 24 successful launches before undergoing a catastrophic launch accident.

The important difference, of course, is that Apollo had a launch escape system which could pull the crew to safety in the event of an accident on the pad or in the first few minutes of flight.
My point exactly Waspie. Challenger and Columbia unfortunately happened and Apollo 13 didn't make it to the moon but fortunately the crew returned safely.

It's good to have some skepticism so you won't be gullible & naïve. But to much of it can make you arrogant & egotistical.

#55    MID

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 02:35 PM

View PostRyegrog, on 29 July 2012 - 02:49 AM, said:

My point exactly Waspie. Challenger and Columbia unfortunately happened and Apollo 13 didn't make it to the moon but fortunately the crew returned safely.

What was your point?


#56    MID

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 04:57 PM

*SNIP*

Quote

My point exactly Waspie. Challenger and
Columbia unfortunatelyppened and Apollo 13 didn't make it to the moon but fortunately the crew returned safely.


What exactly was your point there?

I know there probably won't be an answer, but try not to blow wind, OK?

Edited by Lilly, 29 July 2012 - 06:26 PM.
removed quoted comment


#57    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 07:16 PM

View PostMID, on 28 July 2012 - 05:35 PM, said:

Yes, Waspie.  I recall.
But that was an in flight incident...
I was getting more to theposter's  idea of an explosion on the launch pad. Maybe I'm being too picky.





Indeed, and that worked automatically (in a small fraction  of a second upon detecting a catastrophic potential) or manually.

I am more or less trying to get into the logic which was behind the statemenrt about the fatal launch pad explosion potential...

There is a precedent, although to a Soviet manned flight, not to one from the US. The Soyuz T10-1 accident in 1983, involved a fire and explosion, with the launch escape system blasting the crew with only 2 seconds to spare.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#58    MID

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 07:23 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 29 July 2012 - 07:16 PM, said:

There is a precedent, although to a Soviet manned flight, not to one from the US. The Soyuz T10-1 accident in 1983, involved a fire and explosion, with the launch escape system blasting the crew with only 2 seconds to spare.

Thanks for that.  I didn't remember that one!

:tsu:


#59    MID

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 07:59 PM

I think we have a resolution to this thread, don't we?

If the Apollo 11 crew were stranded on the surface of the Moon.


...They'd have perished there 43 years ago.
Mike Collins would be known as the one who came back, and Tranquility Base would be an honored site, a crypt, containing the bodies of two American heroes.
And the manned space program may have never been the same again.

Fortunately, we don't have to contemplate such a thing.


#60    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 08:19 PM

View PostMID, on 29 July 2012 - 07:59 PM, said:

I think we have a resolution to this thread, don't we?

If the Apollo 11 crew were stranded on the surface of the Moon.


...They'd have perished there 43 years ago.

That is true.

I have no doubt that NASA would have resolved whatever caused the accident. There would almost certainly have been at least on more test flight of the LM and then another landing attempt made. The USA would have still been the first to the moon albeit missing JFKs target of the end of the decade.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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