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Curiosity Lands on Mars

mars curiosity mars science laboratory rover nasa

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#16    JesseCuster

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 04:26 PM

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Curiosity photographed during descent by the HiRISE camera on board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.  Amazing.

"The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool." - Richard P. Feynman

#17    SameerPrehistorica

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 04:45 PM

Great achievement...Lets see if humans can really live on Mars or not..

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#18    pallidin

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 04:53 PM

View PostArchimedes, on 06 August 2012 - 04:26 PM, said:

Posted Image

Curiosity photographed during descent by the HiRISE camera on board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.  Amazing.

Just out of curiosity :w00t: do you know if there are more of those type pics?
That is, is that the only one taken during descent? Would love to see them.


#19    Gaden

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 05:19 PM

Congratulations to the Curiosity team! Looking forward to all the pics/discoveries in the future. NOT looking forward to the next generation of 'Look what NASA is hiding' (ruins, statues, fossils, etc.) hoaxes. I am curious how long 'till the first ones show up.

Edited by Gaden, 06 August 2012 - 05:22 PM.

I'm trying to see things from your point of view, I just can't get my head that far up my butt

#20    Abramelin

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 05:35 PM

View PostGaden, on 06 August 2012 - 05:19 PM, said:

Congratulations to the Curiosity team! Looking forward to all the pics/discoveries in the future. NOT looking forward to the next generation of 'Look what NASA is hiding' (ruins, statues, fossils, etc.) hoaxes. I am curious how long 'till the first ones show up.

Not long, but this one comes with a healthy doses of sarcasm, lol:

http://www.unexplain...30#entry4402836

:lol:


#21    Archosaur

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 07:39 PM

Another step foreward on our exploration of our solar system. :clap:


#22    DONTEATUS

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 08:33 PM

Still Boggles the Mind !
:tu: :tu: :tu: :tu: :tu:

Still Boggles the Mind !
:tu: :tu: :tu: :tu: :tu:

This is a Work in Progress!

#23    27vet

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 08:58 PM

View PostDKO, on 06 August 2012 - 02:34 PM, said:

I think this is great news but there will always be the few that will say "Why did they waste money on this? Why not spending it on curing cancer?"

Great job mankind. :tu:

How much money has the world wasted on wars and other BS? If that money had been spent on space exploration instead, we would have been living on Mars and Venus by now.

BTW well done to NASA!

Edited by 27vet, 06 August 2012 - 09:01 PM.


#24    MID

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 09:05 PM

This was a complicated piece of remote space flying, and it was from the start.   About 15 hours ago, trying to stuifle a scream like any of you who watched heard from JPL, there was a tear for those fine people and the magnificent job they did.
..As always.


Another illustration of NASA at its best, showing the difficulty of putting a vehicle on the surface of another planet, with a 8-12 minute round trip radio transmission time.... :cry:
It's tough, but we've seen successful Mars landings before, and we saw a successful landing on Titan!  And that was with an  hour from sending a command and it's being received!

I think curiosity will astound, much as spirit and opportunity have.

We're about to start finding out! :tsu:

:tsu: :tsu: :tsu:   Way to go, gang...AGAIN!!


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Edited by MID, 06 August 2012 - 09:08 PM.


#25    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 10:11 PM

View PostMID, on 06 August 2012 - 09:05 PM, said:

and we saw a successful landing on Titan!
We did, but (pardon me being both pedantic and partisan) Cassini may have been a NASA project but the Huygens lander was made by ESA.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#26    Harlequin Dreamer

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 10:16 PM

View Post27vet, on 06 August 2012 - 08:58 PM, said:

How much money has the world wasted on wars and other BS? If that money had been spent on space exploration instead, we would have been living on Mars and Venus by now.

BTW well done to NASA!
Thats true we have wasted but we would probably be at war with them by now. Anyway well done to the folks at nasa & around the world who helped this to happen can't wait to see the pic's & info that curiosity starts sending back.  :tu:


#27    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 10:16 PM

View Post27vet, on 06 August 2012 - 08:58 PM, said:

we would have been living on Mars and Venus by now.

Mars maybe but Venus no way. We haven't been able to design anything that can survive for much more than 2 hours there.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#28    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 10:38 PM

Some more details about the landing:


NASA Lands Car-Size Rover Beside Martian Mountain



www.nasa.gov said:

 This is one of the first images taken by<br />
NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on<br />
Mars the evening of Aug. 5 PDT (morning<br />
of Aug. 6 EDT).<br />
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech<br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/msl-3.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'> Full image and caption</a>
This is one of the first images taken by
NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on
Mars the evening of Aug. 5 PDT (morning
of Aug. 6 EDT).
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Full image and caption
PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's most advanced Mars rover Curiosity has landed on the Red Planet. The one-ton rover, hanging by ropes from a rocket backpack, touched down onto Mars Sunday to end a 36-week flight and begin a two-year investigation.

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft that carried Curiosity succeeded in every step of the most complex landing ever attempted on Mars, including the final severing of the bridle cords and flyaway maneuver of the rocket backpack.

"Today, the wheels of Curiosity have begun to blaze the trail for human footprints on Mars. Curiosity, the most sophisticated rover ever built, is now on the surface of the Red Planet, where it will seek to answer age-old questions about whether life ever existed on Mars -- or if the planet can sustain life in the future," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "This is an amazing achievement, made possible by a team of scientists and engineers from around the world and led by the extraordinary men and women of NASA and our Jet Propulsion Laboratory. President Obama has laid out a bold vision for sending humans to Mars in the mid-2030's, and today's landing marks a significant step toward achieving this goal."

Curiosity landed at 10:32 p.m. Aug. 5, PDT, (1:32 a.m. EDT Aug. 6) near the foot of a mountain three miles tall and 96 miles in diameter inside Gale Crater. During a nearly two-year prime mission, the rover will investigate whether the region ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life.

"The Seven Minutes of Terror has turned into the Seven Minutes of Triumph," said NASA Associate Administrator for Science John Grunsfeld. "My immense joy in the success of this mission is matched only by overwhelming pride I feel for the women and men of the mission's team."

Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion<br />
Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., celebrate<br />
the landing of NASA's Curiosity rover on<br />
the Red Planet. The rover touched down on<br />
Mars the evening of Aug. 5 PDT (morning of<br />
Aug. 6 EDT).<br />
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech<br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/cheering.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'> Full image and caption</a>
Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion
Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., celebrate
the landing of NASA's Curiosity rover on
the Red Planet. The rover touched down on
Mars the evening of Aug. 5 PDT (morning of
Aug. 6 EDT).
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Full image and caption
Curiosity returned its first view of Mars, a wide-angle scene of rocky ground near the front of the rover. More images are anticipated in the next several days as the mission blends observations of the landing site with activities to configure the rover for work and check the performance of its instruments and mechanisms.

"Our Curiosity is talking to us from the surface of Mars," said MSL Project Manager Peter Theisinger of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "The landing takes us past the most hazardous moments for this project, and begins a new and exciting mission to pursue its scientific objectives."

Confirmation of Curiosity's successful landing came in communications relayed by NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter and received by the Canberra, Australia, antenna station of NASA's Deep Space Network.

Curiosity carries 10 science instruments with a total mass 15 times as large as the science payloads on the Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity. Some of the tools are the first of their kind on Mars, such as a laser-firing instrument for checking elemental composition of rocks from a distance. The rover will use a drill and scoop at the end of its robotic arm to gather soil and powdered samples of rock interiors, then sieve and parcel out these samples into analytical laboratory instruments inside the rover.

To handle this science toolkit, Curiosity is twice as long and five times as heavy as Spirit or Opportunity. The Gale Crater landing site places the rover within driving distance of layers of the crater's interior mountain. Observations from orbit have identified clay and sulfate minerals in the lower layers, indicating a wet history.

The mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The rover was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

For more information on the mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity And http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster / D.C. Agle 818-354-6278 / 818-393-9011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov / agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

2012-230



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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#29    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 11:08 PM

View Postpallidin, on 06 August 2012 - 04:53 PM, said:

Just out of curiosity :w00t: do you know if there are more of those type pics?
That is, is that the only one taken during descent? Would love to see them.

It looks as if this was the only image MRO took of Curiosity during it's descent. No doubt it will image the rover on the ground of the coming days and weeks.

Here is the NASA article about this image:


NASA's Curiosity Rover Caught in the Act of Landing



www.nasa.gov said:

Posted Image

NASA's Curiosity rover and its parachute were spotted by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as Curiosity descended to the surface on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6 EDT). Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona Full image and caption Curiosity latest images Latest videos



Curiosity and its parachute are in the center<br />
of the white box; the inset image is a cutout<br />
of the rover stretched to avoid saturation.<br />
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona <br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia15978b.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'>  Full image and caption</a><br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/gallery-indexEvents.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'> Curiosity latest images</a>
Curiosity and its parachute are in the center
of the white box; the inset image is a cutout
of the rover stretched to avoid saturation.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona
Full image and caption
Curiosity latest images
PASADENA, Calif. An image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance orbiter captured the Curiosity rover still connected to its 51-foot-wide (almost 16 meter) parachute as it descended towards its landing site at Gale Crater.

"If HiRISE took the image one second before or one second after, we probably would be looking at an empty Martian landscape," said Sarah Milkovich, HiRISE investigation scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "When you consider that we have been working on this sequence since March and had to upload commands to the spacecraft about 72 hours prior to the image being taken, you begin to realize how challenging this picture was to obtain."

The image of Curiosity on its parachute can be found at: http://www.nasa.gov/.../pia15978b.html

The image was taken while MRO was 211 miles (340 kilometers) away from the parachuting rover. Curiosity and its rocket-propelled backpack, contained within the conical-shaped back shell, had yet to be deployed. At the time, Curiosity was about two miles (three kilometers) above the Martian surface.

"Guess you could consider us the closest thing to paparazzi on Mars," said Milkovich. "We definitely caught NASA's newest celebrity in the act."

The green diamond shows approximately<br />
where NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars,<br />
a region about 2 kilometers northeast of its<br />
target in the center of the estimated landing<br />
region (blue ellipse).<br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia15981.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'>  Full image and caption</a>
The green diamond shows approximately
where NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars,
a region about 2 kilometers northeast of its
target in the center of the estimated landing
region (blue ellipse).
Full image and caption
Curiosity, NASA's latest contribution to the Martian landscape, landed at 10:32 p.m. Aug. 5, PDT, (1:32 on Aug. 6, EDT) near the foot of a mountain three miles tall inside Gale Crater, 96 miles in diameter.

In other Curiosity news, one part of the rover team at the JPL continues to analyze the data from last night's landing while another continues to prepare the one-ton mobile laboratory for its future explorations of Gale Crater. One key assignment given to Curiosity for its first full day on Mars is to raise its high-gain antenna. Using this antenna will increase the data rate at which the rover can communicate directly with Earth. The mission will use relays to orbiters as the primary method for sending data home, because that method is much more energy-efficient for the rover.

Curiosity carries 10 science instruments with a total mass 15 times as large as the science payloads on the Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity. Some of the tools are the first of their kind on Mars, such as a laser-firing instrument for checking rocks' elemental composition from a distance. Later in the mission, the rover will use a drill and scoop at the end of its robotic arm to gather soil and powdered samples of rock interiors, then sieve and parcel out these samples into analytical laboratory instruments inside the rover.

To handle this science toolkit, Curiosity is twice as long and five times as heavy as Spirit or Opportunity. The Gale Crater landing site places the rover within driving distance to layers of the crater's interior mountain. Observations from orbit have identified clay and sulfate minerals in the lower layers, indicating a wet history.

The mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The rover was designed, developed and assembled at JPL.

For more information on the mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ .

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson. The instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project and the Mars Exploration Rover Project are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the orbiter. For more about the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, see http://www.nasa.gov/mro .  

Guy Webster/D.C. Agle 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
Guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov / agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown/Steve Cole 202-358-1726/202-358-0918
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov / Stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov

2012-232



Posted Image Source


"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#30    DieChecker

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 11:57 PM

No sign of Decepticons yet??

Very cool mission. "The size of a car"... I don't think most people realize how big this thing is. :tu:

A working Plutonium battery is a good precident for sending a rover to Europa, and being able to melt down to the water under the ice crust.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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