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Underwater civilisation predating last iceage


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#91    Abramelin

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 01:33 AM

View PostDieChecker, on 14 August 2012 - 07:08 PM, said:

But, I very much doubt that the Cave of Schist people mustered up tens or hundreds of thousands of citizen soldiers and marched out and beat the Continent of Atlantis and their supposedly more advanced professional army. The story reads like a Bible Story where Aaron or Moses does something and a handful of Israelites takes out ten times their number.

The Cave of Schist merely proves people did indeed live in that area long ago, and maybe most of the rest of those people lived in huts.

Plato's story could have been based on some vague folk mythology with a lot of added embellishment to make the "Athenians" look sophisticated.


#92    Harte

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 12:23 PM

View Postdocyabut2, on 14 August 2012 - 10:49 PM, said:

qoute-Some interesting reads for ruins around Bimini probably predating the last iceage............

Forget Bimini I `ve been going around with Gerg Little on this, by the study of the dirt there was not a culture there that predating the last ice age.,or 12,000 years ago.  The  so called stone ankors that he found were only fish holes

Absolutely right

If there was some ancient culture on Bimini, then wouldn't it show in the archaeology of Bimini?

Some beach rock just offshore doesn't make a wharf.  If there was some kind of landing there, there would be all sorts of other ancient constructs in that area on dry land.

There's not.


View PostHarsh86_Patel, on 14 August 2012 - 07:17 AM, said:

Do you know that we are still not able to define the nature of Gravitational force.........newton only formulated a mathematical equation to measure it's effect believing it's there and is called gravity is much like a leap of faith (i.e like the centrifugal force,there are formulas to measure it but the force is considered to be a fictituos force i.e you can feel it but it's not supposed to be real)
I agree that a complete understanding of gravity has not been reached.

But your statement about it simply being a falling apple is quite the oversimplification of why Newton is famous and you are not, Wouldn't you agree?
After all, Newton pretty much single-handedly invented calculus, and didn't even think it was important enough to publish until the French got close to re-inventing it.

Regarding gravity, there are several theories that would completely explain it.  The problem is, we don't know which one (if any) is correct.

When we nail down the Higgs Boson, it will go a long way toward completing gravitational theory.

View PostHarsh86_Patel, on 14 August 2012 - 07:17 AM, said:

i didn't mean to badmouth anyone but you have to acknowledge that mainstream historians/archealogists are under a lot of pressure from their peers whenever they come up with a new hypothesis,and this fear can affect their reporting in a negative way
Every mainstream scientist is desperately trying to prove previous theories to be incorrect.  That's one definition of science itself.

So, no, there's no "peer pressure" to conform.  The real peer pressure is to re-write the history/science books.

Like Newton and Einstein (among thousands of others) did.

Harte

Edited by Harte, 15 August 2012 - 12:24 PM.

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#93    Harsh86_Patel

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 05:02 PM

View PostHarte, on 15 August 2012 - 12:23 PM, said:

Absolutely right

If there was some ancient culture on Bimini, then wouldn't it show in the archaeology of Bimini?

Some beach rock just offshore doesn't make a wharf.  If there was some kind of landing there, there would be all sorts of other ancient constructs in that area on dry land.

There's not.



I agree that a complete understanding of gravity has not been reached.

But your statement about it simply being a falling apple is quite the oversimplification of why Newton is famous and you are not, Wouldn't you agree?
After all, Newton pretty much single-handedly invented calculus, and didn't even think it was important enough to publish until the French got close to re-inventing it.

Regarding gravity, there are several theories that would completely explain it.  The problem is, we don't know which one (if any) is correct.

When we nail down the Higgs Boson, it will go a long way toward completing gravitational theory.


Every mainstream scientist is desperately trying to prove previous theories to be incorrect.  That's one definition of science itself.

So, no, there's no "peer pressure" to conform.  The real peer pressure is to re-write the history/science books.

Like Newton and Einstein (among thousands of others) did.

Harte
Newton was also a known occultist and alchemist,thought i would just add that since we were talking about him...............also when i gave the falling apple example i didn't mean to say why i am not as famous but was just trying to highlight that truth and intelligence is not all about degrees...........Person who suggested Higgs Boson first was ridiculed by his peers.........Einstein was a petty clerk...........

Edited by Harsh86_Patel, 15 August 2012 - 05:18 PM.


#94    Harte

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 05:56 PM

View PostHarsh86_Patel, on 15 August 2012 - 05:02 PM, said:

Newton was also a known occultist and alchemist,thought i would just add that since we were talking about him
True.  Newton was obsessed with the Bible code as well.

In that age, less was known about the nature of reality.  See the "clockwork Universe" for example.

View PostHarsh86_Patel, on 15 August 2012 - 05:02 PM, said:

Person who suggested Higgs Boson first was ridiculed by his peers
please provide evidence for why you believe this to be true.  You should probably read this before you try to do this.

View PostHarsh86_Patel, on 15 August 2012 - 05:02 PM, said:

.........Einstein was a petty clerk...........

Einstein worked for a living, and his position in the patent office was anything but petty.

You seem to think that things have always been the way they are today.  There was no such thing as a college degree in the modern sense in Newton's day.

In Einstein's time, the system of grads working post-doc with mentor/professors didn't exist in Germany.  It was pretty much a free for all.  If you came up with something, you sent it to a scientific journal for publishing (or not.)  You didn't get any job with any university if you hadn't done something like that.

Today, it's the other way around.

Higgs was already a respected professor of Physics when he proposed the method that allowed certain particles to have mass without violating known principles.  It is very difficult and very deep work, and nobody ridiculed it, in spite of what you may believe or may have heard.

Harte

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#95    ViperWolf

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 03:47 AM

View PostHarsh86_Patel, on 08 August 2012 - 04:14 PM, said:

Ohk i should rephrase any information or explanations on the ruins of these civilization which are in areas presently underwater.
LOL CORMAC - I hate to say it but if you ran the planet, we would have never discovered anything that wasn't already a fact or discovered prior.  You always go with "no, doesn't exist" or something to that nature?  I am not questioning your intellegence, by any means,  you may and probally are avery educated person, but I think it is somewhat taking the easy rd to go with the obvious?  Would the world still be flat? There are quite a few mysteries still left out there,  I have no clue as to which are real or not, but Based on past history, science is ever-evolving and constantly having to make adjustments for previous "scientific Facts" - So I wouldn't be so quick to pre-judge - It takes away from the excitement and mystry of the world and helps people searching for things that have yet to be discovered!


#96    cormac mac airt

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 04:32 AM

View PostViperWolf, on 07 November 2012 - 03:47 AM, said:

LOL CORMAC - I hate to say it but if you ran the planet, we would have never discovered anything that wasn't already a fact or discovered prior.  You always go with "no, doesn't exist" or something to that nature?  I am not questioning your intellegence, by any means,  you may and probally are avery educated person, but I think it is somewhat taking the easy rd to go with the obvious?  Would the world still be flat? There are quite a few mysteries still left out there,  I have no clue as to which are real or not, but Based on past history, science is ever-evolving and constantly having to make adjustments for previous "scientific Facts" - So I wouldn't be so quick to pre-judge - It takes away from the excitement and mystry of the world and helps people searching for things that have yet to be discovered!

Sorry to hear that you don't like the fact there's no evidence for the things that I reply in response to. But that's not going to make said evidence appear just because you or anyone else wants it to be there. Show me the evidence and I can adjust my take on same accordingly, but I'll never say "Uh huh, yeah, your right" when the evidence clearly shows whomever I'm replying to is wrong.

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#97    Harsh86_Patel

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 05:16 AM

View PostViperWolf, on 07 November 2012 - 03:47 AM, said:

LOL CORMAC - I hate to say it but if you ran the planet, we would have never discovered anything that wasn't already a fact or discovered prior.  You always go with "no, doesn't exist" or something to that nature?  I am not questioning your intellegence, by any means,  you may and probally are avery educated person, but I think it is somewhat taking the easy rd to go with the obvious?  Would the world still be flat? There are quite a few mysteries still left out there,  I have no clue as to which are real or not, but Based on past history, science is ever-evolving and constantly having to make adjustments for previous "scientific Facts" - So I wouldn't be so quick to pre-judge - It takes away from the excitement and mystry of the world and helps people searching for things that have yet to be discovered!
On the contrary you should question everything that Cormac says is a fact,you will be surprised by how much of it is assumptions.
Many mainstream facts are often not really facts especially when it comes to history which is usually based on consensus.
The demand for evidence is highly selective.


#98    Tutankhaten-pasheri

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:56 AM

View Postvizhakat, on 24 November 2012 - 07:50 AM, said:

How do we rate the views mentioned in an amazon kindle ebook with very similar theme - titled the 'The Guardians of Karma'
Rate this book as fiction. This quote from the only reviewer so far "While reading it I felt that the author must have an incredible imagination". But of course never take any review on amazon at face value when it comes to any contentious issues. Look at reviews for books by the alternaviks like Hancock and Bauval, clearly they are nearly all written by either their friends or fanboys, and many of the reviews for their books have remarkably similar styles of writing and sycophancy





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