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How long before robots can think like us?

robots hal alan turing turing test

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#16    Render

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 10:30 PM

View PostStarMountainKid, on 23 August 2012 - 10:04 PM, said:

From my little research, scientists have only developed a chip inserted in a rats brain.
http://www.infowars....rols-the-brain/

Maybe you can document what you've stated. I have little doubt that this technology will be developed, either for good or for evil purposes.

oh my apologies, you can scratch that word "human" before brain...i don't know how that ended up there.
I ment the rat brain chip thing. which is step towards the human brain version.

I actually found an article from 1996 lol
July 18, 1996 5:45 PM PDT
A new memory chip--for the brain


They even assigned it the appropriately gee-whiz product moniker of "Soul Catcher 2025," as well as some fairly detailed specifications. The 2025 refers to the year the scientists think the idea will become a reality.

http://news.cnet.com...1_3-218102.html

we'll see i guess :D

Edited by Render, 23 August 2012 - 10:31 PM.


#17    StarMountainKid

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 03:39 AM

Render said:

oh my apologies, you can scratch that word "human" before brain...i don't know how that ended up there.
I ment the rat brain chip thing. which is step towards the human brain version.

I understand, my fingers separate from my brain sometimes, not saying that happened with you. (I have to hit the "Edit" button a lot).  :)  All the links I could find were from 2011, so I don't know what's been happening since last year.

I think I wrote a story once where one of my characters wanted to start a business implanting holiday memories in people's brains. That way, people who didn't have time to go on a holiday themselves could have the memories of having gone on a nice holiday without actually having to leave town.
His friend talked him out of the idea, saying this could be misused. Corporations could surreptitiously implant memories of how happy you were with their product in the past, so you would buy the product, having this favorable false memory of it. Governments could also use this technology in many ways to control people.

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#18    Catz

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 06:45 AM

Hi StarMountainKid,
See you found the link I was referring to: www.infowars.com


#19    Render

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 12:52 PM

View PostStarMountainKid, on 24 August 2012 - 03:39 AM, said:

I understand, my fingers separate from my brain sometimes, not saying that happened with you. (I have to hit the "Edit" button a lot).  :)  All the links I could find were from 2011, so I don't know what's been happening since last year.

I think I wrote a story once where one of my characters wanted to start a business implanting holiday memories in people's brains. That way, people who didn't have time to go on a holiday themselves could have the memories of having gone on a nice holiday without actually having to leave town.
His friend talked him out of the idea, saying this could be misused. Corporations could surreptitiously implant memories of how happy you were with their product in the past, so you would buy the product, having this favorable false memory of it. Governments could also use this technology in many ways to control people.

Sounds like Totat Recall
only focussing more on buying products instead of altering identities


#20    Taun

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 01:56 PM

Computers/Robots do not think... They process... The great advantage to a computer is that it processes very quickly, and always processes the data according to the same 'decision tree'...

The most complex AI still does not think...  When a computer/AI beats a person at a game or some such it is because of either its processing speed, the algorythm it uses to process or a mistake by the person it defeats...

Maybe (MAYBE) when we get to quantum processing, a computer can be said to think... but with current cyber technology, the best they can do is some really, really good processing...

And before someone says "well, humans only process. So we don't think either"...  Yes, we process data, but we are also capable of mental activity outside of our 'program'... We can have abstract thoughts that are not in our 'decision trees'... A computer can not...

We can think "1 + 1 =.... gee I like strawberries!"... A computer can not - unless it is specifically programmed to do that...


#21    StarMountainKid

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 04:28 PM

Taun said:

Yes, we process data, but we are also capable of mental activity outside of our 'program'... We can have abstract thoughts that are not in our 'decision trees'...

I'm wondering if this ability of abstract thought is inherent in the design of our brain's neural network. An other question would be, is this ability a property of the brain or is it a property of the mind?

Perhaps an algorithm could be devised to parallel human abstract thought in AI computers.

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A mind untouched by thought...the end of knowledge.
To see reality loose your opinions.

#22    QuantumGuy

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 07:03 PM

View PostTaun, on 24 August 2012 - 01:56 PM, said:

We can think "1 + 1 =.... gee I like strawberries!"... A computer can not - unless it is specifically programmed to do that...

You've apparently never had a rogue pointer :) .

It ultimately comes down to how intelligence and thinking are defined. I would argue that computers do, in fact, think, but in a very elementary and mostly linear and deterministic manner. Human thinking is at least partially linear and deterministic. How do you go about solving problems in math? It's probably a series of defined steps. How is it you can "know" what someone else is thinking and finish sentences started by them? You've just recognized the pattern in their thoughts and are able to predict their next action.

I don't think machine intelligence will reach anywhere near the level as humans until there are some major advancements in neural networks. And I don't think quantum computers will offer an immediate solution. Quantum computers are able to calculate much faster due to their ability to be put in a state of superposition, not because they have a faster clock, transmission speeds, or data storate/recall. Those processes would be faster, of course, but are not the major contributors to processing speed.

The example often pointed to is http://en.wikipedia....ver's_algorithm. It'll be rough if you're not familiar with linear algebra or Dirac notation, but you should be able to get idea of just how much faster Grover's Algorithm is, due to the ability of qubits to be in superposition. (In the quantum circuit, the "H" is representative of the Hadamard matrix, the operation responsible for putting a qubit into superpostition. It shows up is every quantum algorithm I've come across, including the quantum teleportation circuit).

Edited by QuantumGuy, 24 August 2012 - 07:03 PM.





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