Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Bacteria turns toxic chemicals in to gold


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#16    White Unicorn

White Unicorn

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 713 posts
  • Joined:19 Oct 2011
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 06 October 2012 - 12:07 AM

View Post27vet, on 05 October 2012 - 09:04 PM, said:

The gold is part of the source compound. The bacteria is just splitting the molecule. We got a long way to go to transform one element into another.

Except for CERN like experiments, heard they did that a decades ago but it was more way more costly to be practical.


#17    Professor T

Professor T

    Λ Ο Δ

  • Member
  • 2,390 posts
  • Joined:11 Jul 2012
  • Gender:Not Selected

  • I'm not really a Professor so don't take my words as Gospel

Posted 06 October 2012 - 01:10 AM

This sounds like a bit of JP Morgan propaganda to me..


#18    UFO_Monster

UFO_Monster

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,029 posts
  • Joined:20 Apr 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charleston, West Virginia

  • 私は宇宙のガーディアンです

Posted 06 October 2012 - 03:51 AM

Perhaps there is hope for the gold standard after all?


#19    King Fluffs

King Fluffs

    The Resident Misanthrope

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,111 posts
  • Joined:23 Dec 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:England

  • Shadows protect my angel in white...

Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:55 AM

Awesome.
Hopefully the value of gold drops, then I can paint everything with it.


#20    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 16,069 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 08 October 2012 - 05:15 AM

View Post27vet, on 05 October 2012 - 09:04 PM, said:

The gold is part of the source compound. The bacteria is just splitting the molecule. We got a long way to go to transform one element into another.
That is what I was going to say. The bacteria is acting as a catalysing agent. Anyone people that got through a US high school should know what a catalysing agent is, right? So, I'm not sure this is aimed at anyone other then as Entertainment or at the truly ignornant.

I wonder how much Gold Chloride there could be out there in the world? The article says it is not cost effective, except as art.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#21    27vet

27vet

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 694 posts
  • Joined:26 Mar 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:In the tropics

  • Sometimes I sits and thinks and sometimes I just sits.

Posted 10 October 2012 - 07:23 PM

View PostWhite Unicorn, on 06 October 2012 - 12:07 AM, said:

Except for CERN like experiments, heard they did that a decades ago but it was more way more costly to be practical.

View PostDieChecker, on 08 October 2012 - 05:15 AM, said:

That is what I was going to say. The bacteria is acting as a catalysing agent. Anyone people that got through a US high school should know what a catalysing agent is, right? So, I'm not sure this is aimed at anyone other then as Entertainment or at the truly ignornant.

I wonder how much Gold Chloride there could be out there in the world? The article says it is not cost effective, except as art.

Now that I think about it, we do transform some elements... U235 into Kr92 and Ba141... get my drift? And of course fusion...


#22    Moon Dog

Moon Dog

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 10 posts
  • Joined:28 Aug 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

  • Earth Man

Posted 13 October 2012 - 02:44 PM

Sounds like a good way to eliminate the toxic waste; and get sum of the cost back.
No toxic waste + more gold.
Win + Win


#23    Mr Supertypo

Mr Supertypo

    Hi...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Joined:28 Jul 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:somewhere in Europe

  • not for nothing, but you sound like a half [...]

Posted 17 October 2012 - 07:03 AM

is that for real or just a joke?

If it is real, It would ruin the gold marked. That would be sad.


#24    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 16,069 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 17 October 2012 - 09:17 PM

I think it is real, just that it is not practical for making gold. The toxic chemical involved is less common then regular gold and is not available in large amounts.

It would be about as practical as trying to process sea water to get large amounts of gold.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#25    brothers

brothers

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 484 posts
  • Joined:10 Aug 2006
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 October 2012 - 03:05 AM

Are the two golds any different??  not even the slightest??.What about on the molecular level. I would think that older countries in poorer places in this world of ours might benefit from it if is true.

Are the two golds any different??  not even the slightest??.What about on the molecular level. I would think that older countries in poorer places in this world of ours might benefit from it if is true.


#26    Zaphod222

Zaphod222

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,594 posts
  • Joined:05 Sep 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tokyo

  • When the gods wish to punish us, they answer our prayers.
    (Oscar Wilde)

Posted 20 October 2012 - 02:42 PM

Got a coupls of tons of gold chloride in your backyard? I wish I did, lol

I doubt that gold chloride is even a tiny fraction of the chemical pollutants we have to deal with.  This is a totally misleading headline.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users