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The Universe Is Almost Done Making Stars

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#1    Still Waters

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 02:10 PM

In its youth, the universe was a roiling soup of star ingredients, with new stars forming rapidly. But now it’s much quieter, and things are not expected to get more exciting anytime soon, astronomers say.

For the first time, astronomers have figured out the universe's star-birth rate, and found that today, it's 30 times lower than its likely peak some 11 billion years ago. As a result, all of the future stars may be no more than a 5 percent increase above what we’ve got now.

http://www.popsci.co...ly-any-new-ones

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#2    Old Man Waffles

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 02:34 PM

What would happen if all the stars die? would we all die


#3    Pupp3t

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 02:35 PM

If the stars DID die, wouldn't we experience the burst of super-novas at once? Or extruciating pain from black holes?


#4    C235

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 02:44 PM

Our time is as short as a life of a bubble compared to universal scale.


#5    Rlyeh

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 03:28 PM

View PostOld Man Waffles, on 10 November 2012 - 02:34 PM, said:

What would happen if all the stars die? would we all die
You'd be long dead anyway.


#6    Old Man Waffles

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 03:30 PM

View PostRlyeh, on 10 November 2012 - 03:28 PM, said:

You'd be long dead anyway.
Phew! *wipes sweat off forehead*


#7    spud the mackem

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 04:16 PM

How long have we got ?.I must put the kettle on if I have time.

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#8    ninjadude

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 07:27 PM

Waspie, this is kind of unexpected isn't it? Nova redisperse matter and gas for new star creation. I can see some fall off from the "beginning" but they seem to be saying more than that. Expansion of the universe spreading matter too far apart...but near black holes (and those at the center of galaxies) new star creation is happening quicker because of all the matter available.

Edited by ninjadude, 10 November 2012 - 07:28 PM.

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#9    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:03 PM

View Postninjadude, on 10 November 2012 - 07:27 PM, said:

Waspie, this is kind of unexpected isn't it?
No, it's absolutely what you would expect. Entropy means that the system of recycling material into more stars simply must break down eventually. No system can remain in equilibrium forever.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#10    Briggstan

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 04:43 AM

This is very interesting, could there be qualities we don't understand yet that could make the universe exist longer than we can predict? I imagine our sun exploding would be one thing, but what about black holes do they exist forever?


#11    Pyridium

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 06:19 AM

Think about this.  Based on the numbers supplied in the OP, there are about 100 times as manty stars in the universe whose light has yet to reach us.  I agree that we have reached the peak in star formation, but we have yet to receive the light from trillions of stars born in the past several milion years.  What you see at night is 1% of the light that is headed our way.  If we could magically flip a switch and "see" these stars, our night sky would be solid white with stars light.

We are 14 billion years away from the big bang.  Draw a line from here to the point of the bang.  This is the radius.  We can only see half of our half of the universe in a 90 degree spread from the point of the bang to where we are now.  We will never see the light generated from the other side of the universe, or other side of the big bang.

I believe big bangs happen all the time.  Our big bang occured at the same time as another big bang, 15 billion light years away.  It will still take 1 billion years before we can see the light from this "other' universe.  Rest assured, if humanity survives the death of our universe, we will just find a new, younger universe to move to...lol.


#12    Bling

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 07:18 AM

I wanna name a star Bling, do I have time?  :lol:


#13    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 11:09 AM

View PostBling, on 11 November 2012 - 07:18 AM, said:

I wanna name a star Bling, do I have time?  :lol:
You have time, but not the right. Only the International Astronomical Union get to name stars. All those companies that take peoples money to name stars are just conning people as those names have no official recognition.

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#14    minera

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 06:28 PM

they just added another thing to worry about with all the doomsday crap. If nothing happens at the end of the year we should sue all the fear mongers........  !  We have nothing to worry about since our life time is less than a blink of an eye in the universe.

Edited by minera, 11 November 2012 - 06:36 PM.


#15    sergeantflynn

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:31 PM

What ? No more new stars in 11 Billion years time ? How are we supposed to manage then ?  I`ll just have to look at the moon . Boring .






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