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The Ancient Alien Theory Is True


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#5161    seeder

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:35 AM

View Postzoser, on 18 January 2013 - 10:30 AM, said:

The fact is there was high precision in Peru.  I am not bothered about where there wasn't (and maybe there was even at these places before earthquakes and vandalism).

Any pics of high precision work in Ancient Greece?

yes, the Parthenon, 1000 years before PP

clicky
Attached File  parthenon.jpg   153.59K   6 downloads




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Edited by seeder, 18 January 2013 - 10:36 AM.

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#5162    zoser

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:39 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 January 2013 - 10:34 AM, said:


And if the stones were indeed soft, creating sharp corners would have been the easiest thing to do.

These are andesite.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image


#5163    zoser

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:40 AM

View Postseeder, on 18 January 2013 - 10:35 AM, said:

yes, the Parthenon, 1000 years before PP

clicky
Attachment parthenon.jpg




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Cant see precision in granite.  Lots of stones forming the base with large gaps in it.

Posted Image


#5164    seeder

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:41 AM

View Postzoser, on 18 January 2013 - 10:39 AM, said:

These are andesite.

who said?

The England team visited an orphanage in Brazil today. “It’s heartbreaking to see their sad little faces with no hope” .....said Jose, age 6.
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

#5165    zoser

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:41 AM

Duplicate

Edited by zoser, 18 January 2013 - 10:44 AM.

Posted Image


#5166    Abramelin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:41 AM

View Postzoser, on 18 January 2013 - 10:39 AM, said:

These are andesite.

Posted Image

Posted Image

And you can see all those tiny dents. By pounding with cobbles and hardened bronze chisels.


#5167    zoser

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:43 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 January 2013 - 10:34 AM, said:

The PP blocks you posted a photo of were made of red sandstone, not andesite. We have already posted links to research that tells us just that.

And this is what Wiki says:

This stone slab is 7.81 meters long, 5.17 meters wide and averages 1.07 meters thick. Based upon the specific gravity of the red sandstone from which it was carved, this stone slab has been estimated to weigh 131 metric tons.[5] The other stonework and facing of the Pumapunku consists of a mixture of andesite and red sandstone. The core of the Pumapunku consists of clay. The fill underlying selected parts of the edge of the Pumapunku consists of river sand and cobbles instead of clay. Excavations at the Pumapunku have documented “three major building epochs, in addition to small repairs and remodeling.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumapunku

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And if the stones were indeed soft, creating sharp corners would have been the easiest thing to do.

Can't believe you posted that Abe? :blush:

View PostAbramelin, on 18 January 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

And you can see all those tiny dents. By pounding with cobbles and hardened bronze chisels.

Not proof of pounding.  Just the nature of granite.

Posted Image


#5168    Abramelin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:44 AM

View Postzoser, on 18 January 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

andesite

Yes, but not those 'lego' blocks with their high precision.


#5169    Abramelin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:46 AM

View Postzoser, on 18 January 2013 - 10:43 AM, said:

Can't believe you posted that Abe? :blush:



Not proof of pounding.  Just the nature of granite.

That creating sharp corners would be the easiest thing to do if the stone was soft? Yes, and so the stones weren't soft to begin with.

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The nature of granite? Where has your vitrification suddenly gone? If it was molten and solidified, I doubt you'd see all those tiny dents.



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Edited by Abramelin, 18 January 2013 - 10:48 AM.


#5170    zoser

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:47 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 January 2013 - 10:44 AM, said:

Yes, but not those 'lego' blocks with their high precision.

You mean PP?  They are high precision compared to anything found since that date.

Much easier to explain though now.  Uncomfortable as the implications may be.  I'm only the newsreader.  I didn't create the history of the world.

You guys will be blaming me for Dunkirk next.

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#5171    zoser

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:49 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 January 2013 - 10:46 AM, said:

That creating sharp corner would be the easiest thing to do if the stone was soft?

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The nature of granite? Where has your vitrification suddenly gone?

Who says granite can't vitrify with heat?  We only know it won't vitrify with chemicals.  Granite and andesite both have high quartz content by the way.

View PostAbramelin, on 18 January 2013 - 10:44 AM, said:

Yes, but not those 'lego' blocks with their high precision.

Proof?

Posted Image


#5172    Abramelin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:49 AM

View Postzoser, on 18 January 2013 - 10:48 AM, said:

Who says granite can't vitrify with heat?  We only know it won't vitrify with chemicals.  Granite and andesite both have high quartz content by the way.

Well, apparently it didn't vitrify because you can't see any sign of it on those blocks.


#5173    Abramelin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:51 AM

View Postzoser, on 18 January 2013 - 10:47 AM, said:

You mean PP?  They are high precision compared to anything found since that date.

Much easier to explain though now.  Uncomfortable as the implications may be.  I'm only the newsreader.  I didn't create the history of the world.

You guys will be blaming me for Dunkirk next.

Of course I meant PP. And those lego blocks are made of red sandstone.

You're a newsreader? One from FOX, maybe? Lol.


#5174    zoser

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:51 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 January 2013 - 10:49 AM, said:

Well, apparently it didn't vitrify because you can't see any sign of it on those blocks.

Those blocks are indoors.  Vitrification is only visible in certain lighting conditions.

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#5175    Admiral Rhubarb

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:51 AM

View Postzoser, on 18 January 2013 - 10:40 AM, said:

Cant see precision in granite.  Lots of stones forming the base with large gaps in it.
Can't see precision? Do you know how tall those columns are? How heavy the bit on top* is? How much effort and precision it must have taken to get those in place, and get them to stay there for thousands of years? is that not slightly more impressive than stacking lots of stones together to make a Wall?

* architectural term

Life is a hideous business, and from the background behind what we know of it peer daemoniacal hints of truth which make it sometimes a thousandfold more hideous.

H. P. Lovecraft.


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