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Trees worldwide a sip away from dehydration

trees dehydration forests

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6 replies to this topic

#1    Still Waters

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 07:59 PM

Trees in most forests, even wet ones, live perilously close to the limits of their inner plumbing systems, a global survey of forests finds.

Seventy percent of the 226 tree species in forests around the world routinely function near the point where a serious drought would stop water transport from their roots to their leaves, says plant physiologist Brendan Choat of the University of Western Sydney in Richmond, Australia. Trees even in moist, lush places operate with only a slim safety margin between them and a thirsty death.

http://www.sciencene...rom_dehydration

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#2    JGirl

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 08:45 PM

from the article: (bolding mine)
"Seventy percent of the 226 tree species in forests around the world routinely function near the point where a serious drought would stop water transport from their roots to their leaves, says plant physiologist Brendan Choat of the University of Western Sydney in Richmond, Australia"

i'm a bit confused by this article. are they suggesting that something must be done? because if the trees routinely function in this manner it means to me at least that they always have.
or is the article suggesting we treat the forests better? if so, i think we all got that already.
or is it suggesting that we stop droughts from happening??

anyway, it sounds a bit alarmist.

Edited by JGirl, 23 November 2012 - 08:46 PM.


#3    Mnemonix

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 08:54 PM

If the trees go, so do we.


#4    Ashotep

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:54 PM

I don't think we can survive without trees, so stop clear cutting.


#5    JGirl

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 12:05 AM

View PostHilander, on 23 November 2012 - 11:54 PM, said:

I don't think we can survive without trees, so stop clear cutting.
i totally agree - many of the products made from wood can be made from other materials in this day and age.
this article seems to be suggesting (or at least the title in any case) that there is some peril involved with this 'discovery'. if the trees have always 'done it this way' i do not see the problem.
what is the problem they're presenting. that's what i'm not clear on lol


#6    pallidin

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 05:47 AM

OK, that's it. I will no longer allow my dog to pee on trees. :passifier:


#7    Bavarian Raven

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 02:46 PM

Quote

OK, that's it. I will no longer allow my dog to pee on trees

but its good fertilizer for trees/plants :yes:






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