Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Pareidolia: Seeing Faces in Unusual Places

pareidolia

  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1    Still Waters

Still Waters

    Deeply Mysterious

  • 37,785 posts
  • Joined:01 Jun 2008
  • Gender:Female

  • Que Sera, Sera - Whatever will be, will be..

Posted 12 December 2012 - 03:38 PM

The psychological phenomenon that causes some people to see or hear a vague or random image or sound as something significant is known as pareidolia (par-i-DOH-lee-a).

There are a number of theories as to the cause of this phenomenon. Experts say pareidolia provides a psychological determination for many delusions that involve the senses. They believe pareidolia could be behind numerous sightings of UFOs, Elvis and the Loch Ness Monster and the hearing of disturbing messages on records when they are played backwards.

Pareidolia often has religious overtones. A study in Finland found that people who are religious or believe strongly in the supernatural are more likely to see faces in lifeless objects and landscapes.

http://www.livescien...pareidolia.html

Posted Image

#2    Jessica Christ

Jessica Christ

    jeanne d'arc, je te suivrai

  • Member
  • 3,608 posts
  • Joined:27 May 2011
  • Location:Currently entering that inner landscape connecting those throughout life

  • It seems so important now but you will get over.

Posted 12 December 2012 - 03:42 PM

I always see faces in lifeless objects and landscapes. Now I figured out that depending on my mood, the shapes (since I see more than faces) will change, from happy faces or comedic, to more sinister looking ones.

Edited by I believe you, 12 December 2012 - 03:44 PM.


#3    orangepeaceful79

orangepeaceful79

    Poltergeist

  • Closed
  • 2,461 posts
  • Joined:05 Jan 2012

Posted 12 December 2012 - 03:47 PM

Love this article.  Thanks, Still Waters.  :tu:


#4    HDesiato

HDesiato

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 281 posts
  • Joined:18 Jun 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 13 December 2012 - 01:20 AM

It's the supernatural gateway drug to subjective verification.
Funny you never hear about a piece of toast with the image of Zack Galifanakis.



#5    Render

Render

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,080 posts
  • Joined:23 Nov 2009
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 13 December 2012 - 11:32 AM

Don't forget apophenia, where a lot of UM members seem to be acquainted with. Wether or not they realise it.


#6    EllJay

EllJay

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,551 posts
  • Joined:26 Dec 2009
  • Gender:Male

  • Today We Are Creating Tomorrow's Yesterday

Posted 13 December 2012 - 11:51 AM

Pareidolia is often used as a blanket excuse to disregard most of sightings of paranormal nature.
Sure, trying to interpret shadows in a photograph as faces etc is many time pareidolia, but BS excuses that all UFO sightings is pareidolia is laughable and is one of the retreat/comfort-zone for skeptics to throw anything they dont like.

Quote

A study in Finland found that people who are religious or believe strongly in the supernatural are more likely to see faces in lifeless objects and landscapes.

The reverse thing was done on skeptics with pictures that actually held a real object in it but it was fuzzed out. The control group saw it but the outspoken skeptics missed it. They even missed obvious images in clouds. I dont know if it is poor pattern recognition or if it is a lack of imagination.
Pattern recognition is surely a survival trait and being able to put pieces together quickly to decide if flight or fight is the right action has saved us more times than the dude who stood still and said- "I dont see anything, I'm skeptical about all this so I'm gonna stay until it is beyond a doubt obvious that there is a lion in the grass"

Posted Image

"Opinions are like a**holes, everyone seems to have one" - Dirty Harry

"All those who believe in psychokinesis, raise my hand... "

"I have a black belt in Feng Shui, the subtle martial art. I go home to you and move a lamp and a chair... twelve years later you lay there on the floor with broken kneecaps and destitute."

#7    EllJay

EllJay

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,551 posts
  • Joined:26 Dec 2009
  • Gender:Male

  • Today We Are Creating Tomorrow's Yesterday

Posted 13 December 2012 - 12:08 PM

Here are a few examples of paradolia images though>>>

The "girl" is the end-knob of a handlebar of a stairway in a burning building.

Posted Image

This one was the sun shining through a porthole on the wall and the irregularities in the bricks makes the image of a face>>

Posted Image


Or this one, a Loch Ness monster...

Posted Image


Until you see that it is a Labrador swimming with a stick

Posted Image

"Opinions are like a**holes, everyone seems to have one" - Dirty Harry

"All those who believe in psychokinesis, raise my hand... "

"I have a black belt in Feng Shui, the subtle martial art. I go home to you and move a lamp and a chair... twelve years later you lay there on the floor with broken kneecaps and destitute."

#8    HDesiato

HDesiato

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 281 posts
  • Joined:18 Jun 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 13 December 2012 - 04:57 PM

 EllJay, on 13 December 2012 - 11:51 AM, said:

Pareidolia is often used as a blanket excuse to disregard most of sightings of paranormal nature.
Sure, trying to interpret shadows in a photograph as faces etc is many time pareidolia, but BS excuses that all UFO sightings is pareidolia is laughable and is one of the retreat/comfort-zone for skeptics to throw anything they dont like.



The reverse thing was done on skeptics with pictures that actually held a real object in it but it was fuzzed out. The control group saw it but the outspoken skeptics missed it. They even missed obvious images in clouds. I dont know if it is poor pattern recognition or if it is a lack of imagination.
Pattern recognition is surely a survival trait and being able to put pieces together quickly to decide if flight or fight is the right action has saved us more times than the dude who stood still and said- "I dont see anything, I'm skeptical about all this so I'm gonna stay until it is beyond a doubt obvious that there is a lion in the grass"

I would appreciate a link to that study. What did the "control group" consist of that differentiated them from skeptics. Do you mean they were believers? Please provide the link :)


#9    EllJay

EllJay

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,551 posts
  • Joined:26 Dec 2009
  • Gender:Male

  • Today We Are Creating Tomorrow's Yesterday

Posted 13 December 2012 - 05:05 PM

 HDesiato, on 13 December 2012 - 04:57 PM, said:

I would appreciate a link to that study. What did the "control group" consist of that differentiated them from skeptics. Do you mean they were believers? Please provide the link :)

Yeah, I will look for it. I'm interested to read it myself again, it was a long time ago. If anyone else here remember it, please post it.
The control group, I believe, was a mix of "ordinary" people, both believers, indifferent and curious people.

"Opinions are like a**holes, everyone seems to have one" - Dirty Harry

"All those who believe in psychokinesis, raise my hand... "

"I have a black belt in Feng Shui, the subtle martial art. I go home to you and move a lamp and a chair... twelve years later you lay there on the floor with broken kneecaps and destitute."

#10    HDesiato

HDesiato

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 281 posts
  • Joined:18 Jun 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 13 December 2012 - 10:01 PM

In a controlled study, I think it would make more sense to
make the pictures the control factor,
otherwise how can a base line be established?
Here's a link to a blog that mentions what appears to to be the same study as the OP:
http://www.google.co...sk_zUPoCT9sigbg


#11    orangepeaceful79

orangepeaceful79

    Poltergeist

  • Closed
  • 2,461 posts
  • Joined:05 Jan 2012

Posted 15 December 2012 - 03:22 PM

 Render, on 13 December 2012 - 11:32 AM, said:

Don't forget apophenia, where a lot of UM members seem to be acquainted with. Wether or not they realise it.

UM would have a hard time existing without Pareidolia, Apophenia, and Confirmation Bias.  Most tales of the paranormal wouldn't exist without these concepts.  If our senses and brains were calibrated to observe, record, and interpret the world around us exactly as it occurs there would be few accounts of paranormal ANYTHING.


#12    Ryu

Ryu

    Born to fail.

  • Member
  • 3,531 posts
  • Joined:17 Dec 2010
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:Where you'll never find me

  • Just because it is in a book doesn't mean it is real or even remotely true.

Posted 15 December 2012 - 09:25 PM

I do not mean to sound ignorant but isn't apophenia and pareidolia the same thing? Seeing images in otherwise random and meaningless patterns?


#13    HDesiato

HDesiato

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 281 posts
  • Joined:18 Jun 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 16 December 2012 - 12:34 PM

 Ryu, on 15 December 2012 - 09:25 PM, said:

I do not mean to sound ignorant but isn't apophenia and pareidolia the same thing? Seeing images in otherwise random and meaningless patterns?
Apophenia is not just seeing in image but seeing a story. The word is similar to epiphany.
From 'Skeptic's Dictionary':
"In contrast to epiphany, however, apophany does not provide insight into the true nature of reality or its interconnectedness, but is a "process of repetitively and monotonously experiencing abnormal meanings in the entire surrounding experiential field" which are entirely self-referential, solipsistic and paranoid: "being observed, spoken about, the object of eavesdropping, followed by strangers” (Conrad K, Gestaltanalyse und Daseinsanalytik. Nervenarzt 1959;30:405-410)."
http://skepdic.com/apophenia.html

Edited by HDesiato, 16 December 2012 - 12:35 PM.


#14    Render

Render

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,080 posts
  • Joined:23 Nov 2009
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 17 December 2012 - 08:44 AM

 Ryu, on 15 December 2012 - 09:25 PM, said:

I do not mean to sound ignorant but isn't apophenia and pareidolia the same thing? Seeing images in otherwise random and meaningless patterns?

Pareidolia is seeing faces in places there aren't
Apophenia is seeing patterns where there are not


#15    tyrant lizard

tyrant lizard

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 560 posts
  • Joined:08 Nov 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:34 AM

 EllJay, on 13 December 2012 - 12:08 PM, said:

Here are a few examples of paradolia images though>>>

The "girl" is the end-knob of a handlebar of a stairway in a burning building.

Posted Image

This one was the sun shining through a porthole on the wall and the irregularities in the bricks makes the image of a face>>

Posted Image


Or this one, a Loch Ness monster...

Posted Image


Until you see that it is a Labrador swimming with a stick

Posted Image
My brain refuses not to see faces in the top two.

Nice pics






Also tagged with pareidolia

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users