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Are Chupacabras Troodons?


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#1    TroodonMan56

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 04:29 AM

I have come up with an idea that Chupacabras might be descendants of the dinosaur Troodon. And this is why I believe so:


I think the Chupacabras’ origin is a lot more complicated than what most people think, and I will explain why. In 1995, a horror movie had just come out in theaters, and this film is probably behind the sightings of the alien-like creatures, as Benjamin Radford correctly pointed out a few years back. However, this cannot explain the dead animals.

My opinion is that the animals most likely died from mundane reasons, such as disease. I do think that Chupacabras are real animals. However, I do not think that they are responsible for the dead and mutilated corpses that were found.

What do I think the Chupacabra is? I do not think it is a dog, and I also don’t think it’s an alien, a shapeshifter from another dimension, or any of that stuff. Instead, I have come up with an idea that, in my opinion, neatly explains the sightings. I am inclined to think that the Chupacabra sightings are most likely caused by an undiscovered species of bird-like reptile.

Reports and references to animals resembling the Chupacabras have been around since long before 1995. In the 1970′s, sightings of an animal resembling a large bipedal reptile were reported by farmers. And the ancient Native American civilizations which lived in Latin America many centuries ago have legends of creatures similar to those sighted nowadays.

There were also many legends about feathered serpents.

I think that a Troodon or one of its relatives managed to survive the Mass Extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period, and evolved into a Chupacabra. I am aware that this idea may sound very far-fetched, and that many people will probably disagree with me. However, I will now explain why I think so.

Back in the mid-1990′s, 2 distinct types of Chupacabras were most-commonly sighted by eyewitnesses. One of them was the alien-like creature, which I think was probably misidentification on the witnesses’ part, caused by seeing that sci-fi movie.

However, the other type of sighting was of a bipedal creature with sharp fangs, sharp claws on its hands and feet, large, egg-shaped eyes, and feathers. This creature was often sighted at night, which means it is probably nocturnal. When all of these characteristics are put together, it reminds me of a certain genus of dinosaur, which lived at the end of the Cretaceous period: Troodon.

Troodons were likely nocturnal, and they also had large eyes, sharp claws and teeth. They are now also believed to have been covered in feathers, since they were closely-related to birds. Also, of all the dinosaurs besides birds that were living at the time, Troodons were probably the most likely (or the least unlikely!) to survive the K-T extinction event. This is for several reasons; It is now widely believed that an asteroid hitting the Earth was the cause of the Extinction. When this asteroid struck, it caused particles of dust to go into the air, and surround the Earth. When this happened, sunlight could not reach through, so the entire planet became cold and dark. Most of the dinosaurs could not adapt to these new conditions, so they died out.

However, Troodon was different. First of all, it wasn’t very large, compared to the other dinosaurs. And most of the animals which survived the extinction were small to medium-sized. Second of all, it had large eyes, and it was nocturnal, which meant that it could probably live well in the dark. Third of all, it was well-adapted to surviving in cold climates. This is because it was warm-blooded, and had feathers for insulation against the cold. Also, fossils of Troodon have been found in Alaska, and paleontologists have evidence that they probably lived there year-round, which means that they had no problem surviving the tough Alaskan winters. Fourth, it was a very adaptable dinosaur. Dinosaurs similar to Troodon survived for 20 million years, and they lived from Alaska all the way down South to Mexico. Troodons were also omnivores, which meant that they were not picky eaters. Therefore, if they could find no prey, they probably could have survived on plants, and vice versa.

So if a small population of Troodons had survived the extinction, and survived until now in remote areas where fossilization was unlikely, I guess it isn’t really that far-fetched to extrapolate that they might still be alive now, and that they might be responsible for at least some of the Chupacabra sightings.

Also, several eyewitnesses have reported seeing spikes that stick up on the creature’s back. Troodon might be able to make its feathers erect, and stand up stiff. To an inexperienced witness, if viewed from far away, these could probably be easily mistaken for spikes, on its back.

So, this is my hypothesis. I realize that it isn’t perfect, and I am not certain that it is true, of course. However, I think that it does a pretty good job, overall, of explaining the Chupacabras phenomenon. So, what does everyone else think about my idea?



#2    Jeff Albertson

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 05:03 AM

Intresting idea one that desires much thought, until then here a intresting article  http://www.frontiers...m-facebook.html

We know almost exactly how many stars exist in our milkway but we have no idea of how many species living on our plant.

#3    TroodonMan56

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 05:43 AM

View PostJeff Albertson, on 13 December 2012 - 05:03 AM, said:

Intresting idea one that desires much thought, until then here a intresting article  http://www.frontiers...m-facebook.html

That link doesn't work.


#4    Antilles

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 06:35 AM

View PostTroodonMan56, on 13 December 2012 - 05:43 AM, said:

That link doesn't work.

Your explanation is interesting but it presupposes that people believe that chupacabras actually exist.


#5    DieChecker

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 06:55 AM

I'd be willing to entertain the orgin being a reptile, like a monitor lizard, but not a dinosaur. Especially on an island like Puerto Rico.

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#6    psyche101

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 07:28 AM

View PostDieChecker, on 13 December 2012 - 06:55 AM, said:

I'd be willing to entertain the orgin being a reptile, like a monitor lizard, but not a dinosaur. Especially on an island like Puerto Rico.

Indeed. The vicinity could be qualified, but the size of the Island itself kinda pushes back against the idea from the get go. Hard to hide a bunch of Dinosaurs on an Island that small I would think. Good at keeping the population at a certain size too. But hey, they are the largest brained Dino :w00t:

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#7    TroodonMan56

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 10:16 PM

View PostDieChecker, on 13 December 2012 - 06:55 AM, said:

I'd be willing to entertain the orgin being a reptile, like a monitor lizard, but not a dinosaur. Especially on an island like Puerto Rico.

Well, I don't think monitor lizards are a good explanation, since many of the sightings report a feathered animal walking on 2 legs.


#8    Overdueleaf

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 12:14 AM

This is the first i have heard of sightings that indicated feathers on the body of the said "chupacabra"...while it is interesting i too find it hard to believe that there has been a breeding population of said, rather good sized Troodons (on a relatively small island) that have gone unnoticed by the general population... save it be for the supposed sightings that are few and far between... yes i understand the nature of cryptozoology but i find it highly unlikely that the supposed chupacabra even exists let alone be a dinosaur remnant.

I would like to point out that there after 20 million years and continental drift .. the places that the Troodon fossils have been reported do not and would not have the same exact climate as they do today... so to say that these creatures were warm blooded based on where thier fossils were found is a bit of a stretch.

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#9    Jeff Albertson

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 02:45 AM

Sorry about that the link is http://frontiersofzo...m-facebook.html   (If the link does not work it can be found at frontiers of zoology Chupacabras drawing from facebook.) It is drawing from accounts from eyewitness that I think does repersent the chupacarbra if it does exist very well. In my oppion I do beleive that it most like will be in the order of Squamates (Lizards) either a known species or new to science. As posted early of them being Varanus ssp. there are only found in the old world not the new world, so I don;t beleive it will be a new species of Varanus ssp.

We know almost exactly how many stars exist in our milkway but we have no idea of how many species living on our plant.

#10    Overdueleaf

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 03:14 AM

View PostJeff Albertson, on 14 December 2012 - 02:45 AM, said:

Sorry about that the link is http://frontiersofzo...m-facebook.html   (If the link does not work it can be found at frontiers of zoology Chupacabras drawing from facebook.) It is drawing from accounts from eyewitness that I think does repersent the chupacarbra if it does exist very well.

Sorry Jeff.. this will always be the representation that constitutes the chupacabra in my mind.. anything else is just a perversion of the mythology behind it to push one's own view point/hypothesis

Attached File  chupacabra.jpg   15.11K   4 downloads

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#11    Jeff Albertson

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 03:34 AM

View PostOverdueleaf, on 14 December 2012 - 03:14 AM, said:

Sorry Jeff.. this will always be the representation that constitutes the chupacabra in my mind.. anything else is just a perversion of the mythology behind it to push one's own view point/hypothesis

Attachment chupacabra.jpg

There no need to be sorry that why we are all here is to voice oppions and listen to new idea. With cryptid animals there are some example of exatreations or overly exaderated charteristics that are associated with cryptid animal. A few example would be the phoniex, and artrellia. With eyewitness accounts there is a enzyme that is produced with fear and stress that effects memory. Also Benny Radfords book associated that picture of the cupacabra with the movies species, which look like  a great arguement. Personal oppion such drawings if done right help with a identification example would be the Drawings in Dr. Roy P. Mackal book In seach of the loch ness monster where there is more than one hyptitical drawing for a possible explanation.

We know almost exactly how many stars exist in our milkway but we have no idea of how many species living on our plant.

#12    Abramelin

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:37 AM

That the troodon could have developed into something else (a humanoid/dinosauroid for instance) if they had survived the K/T event is a thought experiment of Dane Russell in the 80s of the past century.

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http://scienceblogs....thoughts-on-th/



This idea was used in the SciFi series "V", also of the 80s, where these evolved troodons came back to earth (in disguise). After that everyone started talking about "Reptilians"....sigh.


#13    TroodonMan56

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:39 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 14 December 2012 - 04:37 AM, said:

That the troodon could have developed into something else (a humanoid/dinosauroid for instance) if they had survived the K/T event is a thought experiment of Dane Russell in the 80s of the past century.

Posted Image

Posted Image

http://scienceblogs....thoughts-on-th/



This idea was used in the SciFi series "V", also of the 80s, where these evolved troodons came back to earth (in disguise). After that everyone started talking about "Reptilians"....sigh.

But I disagree with Dale Russell's theory; you see, I don't think that the Troodons evolved into aliens, or reptilians, or anything like that. I think that it is possible that they survived to the present-day, but they are normal dinosaurs.


#14    Abramelin

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:50 AM

View PostTroodonMan56, on 14 December 2012 - 04:39 AM, said:

But I disagree with Dale Russell's theory; you see, I don't think that the Troodons evolved into aliens, or reptilians, or anything like that. I think that it is possible that they survived to the present-day, but they are normal dinosaurs.

These socalled humanoid troodons evolved on earth so they were not aliens.

Give the guy in my former post feathers on his back and you have something very close to the traditional image of a chupacabra.

Posted Image

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Edited by Abramelin, 14 December 2012 - 04:59 AM.


#15    Jeff Albertson

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 05:04 AM

I don't believe in this cryptid personal but talking about Dinosauroid people have used Dr. Dale Russels work to explain Reptoids http://www.reptoids.com Also Mountain bloomers which anadoltale evidence suggestes a bipedal dinosaur like trodon, people try to expalin that also with the Dinosauroid theory as it applys to reptoids being the identification to Mountain bloomers.

We know almost exactly how many stars exist in our milkway but we have no idea of how many species living on our plant.




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