Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

CIA Tortured & Sodomized Terror Suspect


  • Please log in to reply
82 replies to this topic

#76    pallidin

pallidin

    Omnipotent Entity

  • Member
  • 9,099 posts
  • Joined:09 Dec 2004
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Somewhere south of the North Pole

  • "When life gets you down... swim with a dolphin"

Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:19 PM

View PostKnight Of Shadows, on 19 March 2013 - 08:59 PM, said:

torturing thousands of people to get lucky break with some one who actually knows something while rest were innocent victims
of unjustifed torture and only suspects .. and as they say the suspect is innocent till proven otherwise
so no even on the effective level .. it is not effective it's a failure of a technique
let alone the moral side effects cause by that
not only it wrong innocent people with slight chance of good results
it also make people go bad for example :


am not terrorist .. but if i got captured and tortured without doing anything and sodomized by cia .. i WILL become a terrorist

Well, that's just bizzare.

Terrorist's do not need CIA "torture" to promote terrorist's killing agenda's.

They(the terrorist's) are very capable of being insane on their own.

Edited by pallidin, 19 March 2013 - 09:34 PM.


#77    Knight Of Shadows

Knight Of Shadows

    Shadow Dancer

  • Member
  • 5,552 posts
  • Joined:17 Mar 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Free Syria

  • Rest In Peace A.B

Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:49 PM

View Postpallidin, on 19 March 2013 - 09:19 PM, said:

Well, that's just bizzare.

Terrorist's do not need CIA "torture" to promote terrorist's killing agenda's.

They(the terrorist's) are very capable of being insane on their own.
and what you call this " torture and sodomizing " ?
isn't this some form of terrorism ? doesn't that make CIA terrorists also ?
or is that your way of avoiding the subject ?

"why should we not rely on Allah when he guided us our path . we shall certainly bear with patience all the hurt you may cause us. for those who want to put their trust in someone should put their trust in Allah.


#78    preacherman76

preacherman76

    Ntwadumela- He who greets with fire

  • Member
  • 12,665 posts
  • Joined:16 Jul 2007
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:in the depths of my mind

Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:23 AM

View Postpallidin, on 19 March 2013 - 09:19 PM, said:

Well, that's just bizzare.

Terrorist's do not need CIA "torture" to promote terrorist's killing agenda's.

They(the terrorist's) are very capable of being insane on their own.

It isnt bizzare at all. Its called blow back, and is very real, and well documented. You can only push people so far before they push back. Assuming 9/11's official story is true, it really shouldnt be a surprize at all. We have killed thousands of innocents and occupied several countries even before these last few wars. Lets say for instance that you are a average joe from Afgan. Say you run a little bakery. You put in a long hard day that started at 3 am, as the sun is going down you make your way home to be with your family only to find your home burned to the ground and your family turned to ashes from a drone attack cause your neighbor might have been considered a ligit target. Now you have a man who lost everything, and has nothing left to lose. Do you honestly believe it would be strange for him to join forces with people who resist your occupation? We kill far more innocents with these drone attacks then we kill "the bad guys". So inturn we create more and more "bad guys" who feel justified to resist. And they are right to resist. 99% of the problems we face in the middle east are self inflicted. Intentionaly no less to keep the military industrial complex in power.

Some things are true, even if you dont believe them.

#79    CRYSiiSx2

CRYSiiSx2

    Paranormal Investigator

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 820 posts
  • Joined:06 Mar 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan, USA

Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:41 AM

Even if this guy was a terrorist.  How can one human being torture another?

Posted Image
NRA - PROTECT THE 2ND AMENDMENT
my twitter @sktm06

#80    preacherman76

preacherman76

    Ntwadumela- He who greets with fire

  • Member
  • 12,665 posts
  • Joined:16 Jul 2007
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:in the depths of my mind

Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:10 PM

No. Our own military's highest-ranking officials have stated over and over and over and over and over and over... that TORTURE DOES NOT YIELD RELIABLE RESULTS. Which, of course, begs the question, "Then why are some Americans supporting it?"

This country apparently has a few very sick citizens.
************************
Why Torture Doesn't Work

By Brig. Gen. David R. Irvine, AlterNet. Posted November 22, 2005.

"When the Wall Street Journal came out in favor of abusive interrogation, it turned a blind eye on reason in favor of supporting the White House line.

Declassified Report: Bush Admin Solicited Torture 'Wish List,' Ordered 'Communist' Tactics

Remarkably, of the nation's major newspapers, only the Wall Street Journal has editorialized in support of torture as a useful tool of American intelligence policy. Regrettably, that position does a huge disservice to the nation and its soldiers. There are really only three issues in this debate, and the Journal carefully turned a blind eye to all three: (1) is torture reliable, (2) is it consistent with America's values and Constitution, and (3) does it best serve our national interests?

No one has yet offered any validated evidence that torture produces reliable intelligence. While torture apologists frequently make the claim that torture saves lives, that assertion is directly contradicted by many Army, FBI, and CIA professionals who have actually interrogated al Qaeda captives. Exhibit A is the torture-extracted confession of Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi, an al Qaeda captive who told the CIA in 2001, having been "rendered" to the tender mercies of Egypt, that Saddam Hussein had trained al Qaeda to use WMD. It appears that this confession was the only information upon which, in late 2002, the president, the vice president, and the secretary of state repeatedly claimed that "credible evidence" supported that claim, even though a now-declassified Defense Intelligence Agency report from February 2002 questioned the reliability of the confession because it was likely obtained under torture. In January 2004, al-Libi recanted his "confession," and a month later, the CIA recalled all intelligence reports based on his statements.

Exhibit B is the case of Manadel al-Jamadi, an Iraqi deemed a "high-value" target by the CIA. After being beaten to an extent that he had several broken ribs, he was subjected to a form of crucifixion known as "Palestinian hanging." Forty-five minutes later, he was dead, never having revealed whatever vital, ticking-bomb information his American interrogator was seeking.

If there is reliable evidence that torture has, in fact, interrupted ticking time bombs and saved lives, the gravity of the crisis created by the administration's free-wheeling torture policy demands straight answers which can be weighed and evaluated by a bipartisan, blue-ribbon commission whose membership might include interrogators, jurists, theologians, national security specialists, military leaders, and political leaders. The damage to our national interests and the dismal record of war candor by this administration has made "trust us" an insufficient justification for such a profound change in American law and moral values.

The Journal claims that Abu Ghraib was an anomaly -- that it has become a "torture narrative" that erroneously blames the CIA for the abuses depicted in the infamous photographs. The Schlesinger report was cited for the conclusion that the perpetrators were merely a group of sadistic, poorly trained Reservists. This argument, however begs the question; the rationale for the McCain amendment rests not upon Abu Ghraib, but upon the cascading stream of documented reports from other places in Afghanistan and Iraq in which brutal torture has been either authorized or winked at by several different military and civilian chains of command."

Some things are true, even if you dont believe them.

#81    Bama13

Bama13

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,891 posts
  • Joined:09 Aug 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Just Southeast of God's country

Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:05 PM

View Postpreacherman76, on 20 March 2013 - 12:10 PM, said:

No. Our own military's highest-ranking officials have stated over and over and over and over and over and over... that TORTURE DOES NOT YIELD RELIABLE RESULTS. Which, of course, begs the question, "Then why are some Americans supporting it?"

This country apparently has a few very sick citizens.
************************
Why Torture Doesn't Work

By Brig. Gen. David R. Irvine, AlterNet. Posted November 22, 2005.

"When the Wall Street Journal came out in favor of abusive interrogation, it turned a blind eye on reason in favor of supporting the White House line.

Declassified Report: Bush Admin Solicited Torture 'Wish List,' Ordered 'Communist' Tactics

Remarkably, of the nation's major newspapers, only the Wall Street Journal has editorialized in support of torture as a useful tool of American intelligence policy. Regrettably, that position does a huge disservice to the nation and its soldiers. There are really only three issues in this debate, and the Journal carefully turned a blind eye to all three: (1) is torture reliable, (2) is it consistent with America's values and Constitution, and (3) does it best serve our national interests?

No one has yet offered any validated evidence that torture produces reliable intelligence. While torture apologists frequently make the claim that torture saves lives, that assertion is directly contradicted by many Army, FBI, and CIA professionals who have actually interrogated al Qaeda captives. Exhibit A is the torture-extracted confession of Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi, an al Qaeda captive who told the CIA in 2001, having been "rendered" to the tender mercies of Egypt, that Saddam Hussein had trained al Qaeda to use WMD. It appears that this confession was the only information upon which, in late 2002, the president, the vice president, and the secretary of state repeatedly claimed that "credible evidence" supported that claim, even though a now-declassified Defense Intelligence Agency report from February 2002 questioned the reliability of the confession because it was likely obtained under torture. In January 2004, al-Libi recanted his "confession," and a month later, the CIA recalled all intelligence reports based on his statements.

Exhibit B is the case of Manadel al-Jamadi, an Iraqi deemed a "high-value" target by the CIA. After being beaten to an extent that he had several broken ribs, he was subjected to a form of crucifixion known as "Palestinian hanging." Forty-five minutes later, he was dead, never having revealed whatever vital, ticking-bomb information his American interrogator was seeking.

If there is reliable evidence that torture has, in fact, interrupted ticking time bombs and saved lives, the gravity of the crisis created by the administration's free-wheeling torture policy demands straight answers which can be weighed and evaluated by a bipartisan, blue-ribbon commission whose membership might include interrogators, jurists, theologians, national security specialists, military leaders, and political leaders. The damage to our national interests and the dismal record of war candor by this administration has made "trust us" an insufficient justification for such a profound change in American law and moral values.

The Journal claims that Abu Ghraib was an anomaly -- that it has become a "torture narrative" that erroneously blames the CIA for the abuses depicted in the infamous photographs. The Schlesinger report was cited for the conclusion that the perpetrators were merely a group of sadistic, poorly trained Reservists. This argument, however begs the question; the rationale for the McCain amendment rests not upon Abu Ghraib, but upon the cascading stream of documented reports from other places in Afghanistan and Iraq in which brutal torture has been either authorized or winked at by several different military and civilian chains of command."

My last retort is your signature/tag or whatever they call the words at the bottom of your post: Some things are true, even if you don't beileve them.

" Mighty little force is needed to control a man whose mind has been hoodwinked; contrariwise, no amount of force can control a free man, a man whose mind is free. No, not the rack, not fission bombs, not anything —you can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him" - Robert Heinlein

#82    preacherman76

preacherman76

    Ntwadumela- He who greets with fire

  • Member
  • 12,665 posts
  • Joined:16 Jul 2007
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:in the depths of my mind

Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:13 PM

View PostBama13, on 20 March 2013 - 01:05 PM, said:

My last retort is your signature/tag or whatever they call the words at the bottom of your post: Some things are true, even if you don't beileve them.

Agreed. Thats why several of our highest ranked officials claim torcher is unreliable to folks like yourself who try to justify the moraly depraved and out right evil practice we call torcher. Another thing that rings true regardless of what one believes, is you reap what you sow.

Some things are true, even if you dont believe them.

#83    CRYSiiSx2

CRYSiiSx2

    Paranormal Investigator

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 820 posts
  • Joined:06 Mar 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan, USA

Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:17 PM

I'd have to say torture would have mixed results, depending on the subject.  But, who are the sick *******s who would want to carry like something that out?  Torturing a human being would require one completely F'ed up individual, which has no right to be working in our government in the first place...

Edited by CRYSiiSx2, 20 March 2013 - 01:22 PM.

Posted Image
NRA - PROTECT THE 2ND AMENDMENT
my twitter @sktm06

#84    Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth

    Non-Corporeal Being

  • Closed
  • 8,732 posts
  • Joined:23 Dec 2011
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:27North 80West

Posted 20 March 2013 - 08:53 PM

View PostCRYSiiSx2, on 20 March 2013 - 01:17 PM, said:

I'd have to say torture would have mixed results, depending on the subject.  But, who are the sick *******s who would want to carry like something that out?  Torturing a human being would require one completely F'ed up individual, which has no right to be working in our government in the first place...

Though it did not deal with actual torture, the Stanford Prison Experiment dealt with behavior that could easily have become torture.  It was done under strictly controlled situations, but ended up revealing just how quickly humans can get into torturing other humans.

The Lucifer Effect is the title of the book, and used to describe this behavior in humans.


#85    OverSword

OverSword

    Forum Divinity

  • Member
  • 17,165 posts
  • Joined:16 Oct 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Seattle WA USA

  • I love chocolate

Posted 20 March 2013 - 09:25 PM

View PostCRYSiiSx2, on 20 March 2013 - 01:17 PM, said:

I'd have to say torture would have mixed results, depending on the subject.  But, who are the sick *******s who would want to carry like something that out?  Torturing a human being would require one completely F'ed up individual, which has no right to be working in our government in the first place...

View PostCRYSiiSx2, on 20 March 2013 - 01:17 PM, said:

I'd have to say torture would have mixed results, depending on the subject.  But, who are the sick *******s who would want to carry like something that out?  Torturing a human being would require one completely F'ed up individual, which has no right to be working in our government in the first place...
They are what is known as sociopaths.  Sociopaths are actively recruited from the ranks of our military to become CIA agents because agents are often asked to do things which no normal person would do.  Most serial killers would have made great CIA operatives.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users