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Can bacteria survive on Mars ?


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#1    Saru

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:53 PM

Scientists have run an experiment to grow bacteria in conditions designed to simulate those on Mars.

Wired said:

Scientists have grown bacteria in a very low-atmospheric-pressure environment, similar to the surface of Mars.

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#2    Ashotep

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 03:43 PM

Just because the planets conditions aren't just like ours doesn't mean there isn't life on it.  Conditions that may be suitable to us may not be suitable for other forms of life.  Even here on Earth there is life in places most things couldn't survive but it evolved there so it can.


#3    King Fluffs

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 04:12 PM

I agree with Hilander.


#4    wolfknight

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 04:30 PM

Of couse it can. Different Planet diffrent Bacteria. Why is everything based on this planet?  


#5    TheMolePatrol

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:04 PM

They base everything off Earth cause its the only example of life we have. Once they discover life on other planetary bodies, then they will include those places in the scope of "what places are habitable?"

I hope they start looking closer at some of Saturn and Jupiter's moons too. Everyone knows about Europa's possible liquid ocean beneath its icy surface. I'm sure there's other places we'd least expect to find life too.


#6    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:30 PM

View Postwolfknight, on 17 December 2012 - 04:30 PM, said:

Of couse it can.
And you know this how exactly?

Science isn't about blind guessing and wishful thinking, it is about deducing the truth from observation and experimentation. Since no bacteria had ever been observed to survive in the remarkably low atmospheric conditions found on the surface of Mars it was impossible to know for sure if they could survive without doing the experiments, without this research your statement would be totally meaningless.

View Postwolfknight, on 17 December 2012 - 04:30 PM, said:

Different Planet diffrent Bacteria. Why is everything based on this planet?  
Since we currently know of no bacteria on any planet other than Earth this statement remains meaningless for the time being.


View Postwolfknight, on 17 December 2012 - 04:30 PM, said:

Why is everything based on this planet?  
As TheMolePatrol correctly said, because Earth is the only example we have. To base assumptions on any other planet would just be guess work.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#7    DieChecker

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:53 PM

Very cool experiments. Should logically have been done decades ago.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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#8    Sundew

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:04 PM

Bacteria from earth might survive in a dormant state, but without water would they be able to grow and reproduce? Also without a magnetic field like the Earth's, Mars is subject to solar radiation that might even kill dormant bacteria.


#9    DieChecker

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 02:26 AM

Without a magnetic field all the bacteria would need is about 3 inches of dirt to protect them. And ice could provide the water, and they have shown the Mars and even Mercury have ice scattered around.

Not to mention there are bacteria that live in nuclear reactor level radiation areas and are just fine. There are actually Deep Earth bacteria that live exclusively on radioactivity. They use a photosenthisis like process that uses radioactivity instead of light photons as energy to create sugars.
http://www.nsf.gov/n...only/eaters.jsp

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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#10    bison

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 02:52 AM

I recall reading recently that, according to the Curiosity radiation instrument, the radiation on the surface of Mars is no worse than astronauts receive in Earth orbit, well inside earth's magnetic field. A rather surprising result, given the weak and fragmentary magnetic field on the Red Planet.
Life appears to be almost incredibly adaptable. It's tempting to suspect that it will be found in a very wide range of planetary environments.


#11    Leftcoastgal

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 02:05 AM

More than bacteria can survive on Mars, apparently.  Interested folks could view this video clip confirming the sky on Mars is blue, there are traces everywhere of former civilization and we've had a physical presence up there since the late 60's.  Mars is pretty much comparable to an Arizona desert.

Check it out:  http://youtu.be/slQD0rUqbGo
Name of clip: The Project Camelot TruTv pilot episode "Shadow Operations: The Mars Project"..

Now, I'll sit back and wait for the thrashing I expect is coming.

For some of you though....enjoy!  Leftcoastgal

Edited by Leftcoastgal, 19 December 2012 - 02:09 AM.


#12    DieChecker

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 02:29 AM

Personnally I think the sky of Mars in not blue. Since the pics showing blue sky have the rocks being an almost grey color, I think the color has been tampered with. The pics with the bright red surface show a reddish sky. And direct observation of Mars by anyone with a telescope shows that the surface is the same color of red. Thus, I think the red sky is the true sky.

Plus, anything that bases a lot of its story on Richard Hoagland's expertise and opinion is just asking to be torn down.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#13    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:54 PM

Can we keep the conspiracy theories to the conspiracy section please?

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#14    Leftcoastgal

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 05:35 PM

Apologies to those offended on the basis of conspiracy or my lack of citing chapter & verse spec that offers hard scientific 'proof',  Anything  else I can say would still  fall into the area of my opinion so I won't  proceed beyond this post.  The  clip was interesting to me as it resonated in several aspects with my current thinking about focus on Mars, not just U.S. attention.  Believe it or not I'd never heard of Hoagland and his sidekick before I saw that clip. Project Camelot, yes, and MUFON, I enjoy and learn from some of their meetings, but .. that said, I'll close.  Time will tell us all eventually, that's good news,  IMO.


#15    harvey72

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:52 PM

Firstly, of course we must simply consider earth-like environments for the possibility of assessing the possibility of alien life. This arisies from the simple fact that we have detectable and measurable life environments on earth which simply provides us with a starting platform. If we stretch out to envisage other forms of life then we simply enter the unscientific realms of science fiction and fantasy.

There are 'extremophiles' on earth (only bacteria) which could perhaps easily survive on Mars, or the possible oceans of Europa (perhaps larger forms of life may exist here too). We have even had viruses accidentally deposited on the moon that have survived the harsh temperatures, radiation and vacuum of space there. Indeed, many basic building blocks of life are probably created in the interstellar medium and deposited throughout the galaxy by comets; like sowing of seeds perhaps.

All this suggests life may be very common, but first we must try and locate environments with which we are familiar; otherwise no government is going to invest in expensive exploration!





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