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Preventing Inherited Disorders in Humans


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Poll: Would you do it? (6 member(s) have cast votes)

Would you prevent inheritable disorders?

  1. Yes (5 votes [83.33%])

    Percentage of vote: 83.33%

  2. No (1 votes [16.67%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.67%

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#1    Render

Render

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 08:01 AM

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Dec. 19, 2012 — A joint team of scientists from The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Laboratory and Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) has developed a technique that may prevent the inheritance of mitochondrial diseases in children.

http://www.scienceda...21219132729.htm


#2    Render

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 06:59 AM

Hmmmm, are ppl afraid to discuss this or something ?
It's gonna happen ... it's the inevitable future, soon to be present...


#3    Render

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 09:21 AM

Guess so, didn't realise it was still such a taboo this day and age when prevention is already widely practiced in serveral ways.


#4    Mistrest

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 03:51 PM

For me, it would be a toss-up. I would give almost anything to have a healthy child, especially one that didn't have the inherited pain-related issues that I have, but the idea that they are using stuff from a donor throws me.. What are the chances that there could be a rejection, or worse, an even worse disease stemming from the transfer. I realize that the article tells of no adverse affects, but how extensively has this been studied? I would love it if my child hadn't inherited my severe ADHD,  but maybe she will someday channel that into genius qualities. I would love if my daughter hadn't inherited my musculoskeletal disorder, but maybe someday she will lead to a cure. What if they hadn't inherited my familial trait of the beautiful eyes, etc... Does this change only the bad stuff, or could it change their endearing, empowering qualities as well?? If it were ONLY the "impurities" that the transfer takes away, I would be all for it... But if it changed the AMAZING underlying qualities that my slightly "imperfect" children possess, my answer would have to be a resounding "NO!"


#5    Render

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 12:40 PM

View PostMistrest, on 28 December 2012 - 03:51 PM, said:

If it were ONLY the "impurities" that the transfer takes away, I would be all for it...

Well that would be the idea.

View PostMistrest, on 28 December 2012 - 03:51 PM, said:

But if it changed the AMAZING underlying qualities that my slightly "imperfect" children possess, my answer would have to be a resounding "NO!"

If you prevent certain aspects and the child is born you'll never know how different that child would've been with all the "faults". So it's just about making a choice i guess.



I just don't like the idea that if you go through certain physical and/or mental obstacles this automatically makes you a better person. Like going through an illness and having to take medicine your entire life or whatever is better than just preventing these unfortunate things.


#6    Render

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 07:25 AM

Study Points to a Safer, Better Test for Chromosomal Defects in the Fetus

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Jan. 10, 2013 — A noninvasive, sequencing-based approach for detecting chromosomal abnormalities in the developing fetus is safer and more informative in some cases than traditional methods, according to a study published Jan. 10 by Cell Press in The American Journal of Human Genetics. This method, which analyzes fetal DNA in the mother's blood, could provide women with a cost-effective way to find out whether their unborn baby will have major developmental problems without risking a miscarriage.

http://www.scienceda...30110121018.htm





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