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Near-Earth asteroid 2012 DA14 [merged x6]

asteroids neo 2012 da14

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#46    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:06 AM


Approach of Asteroid 2012 DA14 from Samford Valley Observatory

This movie from the Samford Valley Observatory in Brisbane, Australia, shows the progress of asteroid 2012 DA14 across the night sky as it nears its closest approach. It was taken at 12:59 UTC on Feb. 15 (7:59 a.m. EST, or 4:59 a.m. PST). The movie has been sped up 50 times.

Credit: J. Bradshaw
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Source: NASA - Multimedia

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#47    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:08 AM


Approach of Asteroid 2012 DA14 as Seen by Murrumbateman Observatory

Movie from the Murrumbateman Observatory in Australia of asteroid 2012 DA14 during its close -- but safe -- flyby of Earth. The images were taken around 17:18 UTC (12:18 p.m. EST, or 9:18 a.m. PST) on Feb. 15, 2013.

Image credit: D. Herald
Asteroid and Comet Watch site

Source: NASA - Multimedia

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#48    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:11 AM


Gingin Observatory Spots Near-Earth Asteroid

This movie shows the asteroid 2012 DA14 flying safely by Earth, as seen by the Gingin Observatory in Australia at 9:50 a.m. PST (12:50 p.m. EST/17:50 UTC), Feb. 15, 2013.

At the time of its closest approach to Earth, at approximately 11:25 a.m. PST (2:25 p.m. EST/19:25 UTC), the asteroid will be about 17,150 miles (27,600 kilometers) above Earth's surface.

The asteroid appears streaked because the telescope was focused on the stars while the asteroid passed through the field of view.

Image courtesy of Gingin Observatory/Tonello  
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Source: NASA - Multimedia

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#49    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:13 AM


Gingin Observatory Spots Near-Earth Asteroid at Closest Approach

Observatory in Australia around the time of its closest approach, 11:24:42 a.m. PST (2:24:42 p.m. EST, or 19:24:24 UTC), Feb. 15, 2013.

At that time, the asteroid was about 17,150 miles (27,600 kilometers) above Earth's surface.

The asteroid appears streaked because the telescope was focused on the stars while the asteroid passed through the field of view.

Images courtesy of Gingin Observatory/Tonello  
Asteroid and Comet Watch site

Source: NASA - Multimedia

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#50    AsteroidX

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:14 AM

I thought it was cool they predicted 17,200miles and thats exactly how close it came. :tu:


#51    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:16 AM


Outbound Near-Earth Asteroid, as Seen from Spain

This set of images from the La Sagra Sky Survey, operated by the Astronomical Observatory of Mallorca in Spain, shows the passage of asteroid 2012 DA14 shortly after its closest and safe -- approach to Earth. The images were taken around 12:59 p.m. PST (3:59 p.m. EST, or 20:59 UTC) on Feb. 15, 2013.

The images have been sped up 10 times.

In the last set of images, the fainter object that passes near the top of the field of view is a satellite or another asteroid.

Images courtesy of La Sagra Sky Survey    
Asteroid and Comet Watch site

Source: NASA - Multimedia

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#52    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:40 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 05 February 2013 - 06:34 AM, said:

Yea, its just a matter of time.  The Tunguska event over a city would be a major disaster.

There is no major disasters on cosmic scales. Even stars have life time. From dust, yellow sun, red giant, red dwarf, pulsar or black hole.
When our solar will come to end we will be devoured by the sun. Eaten then spit out and from our dust new planet or star will be formed.
Its cycle.

Humans will survive, imo. Even if we dont inhabit another world. Stars will create us in different part of cosmos and in different time.
We are star stuff and we are solar powered-staff.

Plants use solar power to convert it into chemical power. We are parasites on plants.

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For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#53    Sundew

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 01:43 PM

It would have been a bigger deal had it enter our atmosphere and skipped off of it like a stone on water. A few space rocks have been caught on camera doing this, blazing a trail across the sky before returning to space. Now that would be a close encounter!

Had this hit Russia like the meteorite, it might have been another Tunguska.


#54    Sundew

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 01:56 PM

Thomas Dolby - N.E.O., from Gate to the Mind's Eye.


#55    stevewinn

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 03:09 PM

well in work i had my work mates out on the roof all looking at the plough, to see if we could catch a glimpse of the asteroid, we didnt have binoculars or anything, so our chances were next to nil. but it go them talking about space, and asking questions about the other stars in the night sky. so the more of these events we have the better it will be to get more people involved in space/astronomy. when will this asteroid next pass by?

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#56    bison

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 03:43 PM

The asteroid's encounter with Earth seems to have spoiled the synchronization of the two, which had them coming fairly close to each other each February. The next moderately close encounter will now be on Feb. 15th, 2046. That will amount to some 2,697,000 miles; not really close at all, by the standard set yesterday.


#57    coolguy

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 08:13 PM

I  wish we could have seen this in north American.there was another comet caught om camera in California..


#58    stevewinn

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 11:15 AM

View Postbison, on 16 February 2013 - 03:43 PM, said:

The asteroid's encounter with Earth seems to have spoiled the synchronization of the two, which had them coming fairly close to each other each February. The next moderately close encounter will now be on Feb. 15th, 2046. That will amount to some 2,697,000 miles; not really close at all, by the standard set yesterday.

oh well, not that long to wait. we have the comet later in the year to look forward to, the one billed as the brightest comet for a century. ISON.

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