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America Unearthed


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#1    Child of Bast

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 01:59 PM

Have any of you in the US seen this show airing on the History Channel? I caught wind of it over the weekend and it seems to be about a one man crusade to change the way history is recorded about the United States. I'm sure this sort of thing is done elsewhere. I think the subject of the episode I briefly watched was about a Mayan presence in Northern Georgia.

Anyway, I was just wondering what the general opinion of this show is. Thanks! :tu:

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#2    AsteroidX

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 02:01 PM

Cant say I have but Ive seen a lot of good shows on those channels. Cant say I watch much TV anymore with all the commercials.


#3    Abramelin

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 02:38 PM

View PostLady Kasey, on 26 December 2012 - 01:59 PM, said:

Have any of you in the US seen this show airing on the History Channel? I caught wind of it over the weekend and it seems to be about a one man crusade to change the way history is recorded about the United States. I'm sure this sort of thing is done elsewhere. I think the subject of the episode I briefly watched was about a Mayan presence in Northern Georgia.

Anyway, I was just wondering what the general opinion of this show is. Thanks! :tu:

I haven't watched the documentary, but I've read about the topic. Mayan presence in Georgia:

http://blog.donquijo...ern-georgia-usa


And I have thought for a long time now that it were the Chontal Maya who settled there:


The precocious Chontal Maya/Itza centered in the northern Yucatan were far ahead of
their contemporary neighbors in the arts and science including writing, mathematics, and public
architecture (Peck 2000:6-22). This study will show that the seafaring and mercantile oriented
Chontal Maya were also a worldly element of the Maya civilization who traveled and spread
their cultural influence not only throughout continental Mesoamerica, but ventured across the
seas in exploration voyages to the islands of the Caribbean and to the shores of Florida.

Consistent with this accomplishment, the Chontal Maya had developed naval engineering,
metallurgy, tool design, and woodworking and ship building capabilities that enabled them to
construct the large composite seaworthy vessels required. Their accomplishments in mathematics
and astronomy also enabled the Chontal Maya to develop a sophisticated method of celestial
navigation for their overseas voyages.


=

The winged and plumed rattlesnake emblem shown so profusely in Chontal Maya/Itza art
(figures 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 10) also appears in prehistoric art of the Indians of northern Florida and
southern Georgia.
The art style depicting the rattlesnake emblems understandably differs
between these two widely separated peoples. But the unique features of wings, feathers, and plumed topknot as applied to the rattlesnake emblem is common to both art forms
.

http://www.newworlde...yaSeafarers.pdf


#4    lightly

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 11:19 PM

very interesting Abramelin, i like this bit from your linked PDF :   "This discussion of prehistoric Indian mounds has been centered on the Florida Indians, with emphasis on the Calusa, as geographically the nearest and most probable point of contact. However, it should be noted that similar prehistoric mound building was practiced by Indians who peopled the Mississippi drainage plain (consequently known as the Mississippian culture) as far north as Illinois and Ohio (Swanton 1946). The current consensus is that the Mississippian mound building preceded that of the mound builders in Florida, but this study suggests that the first mounds, influenced by the Maya, were built by the Calusa and the mound building culture moved north at a later date. As noted earlier this agrees with Sears s (1982) findings that the cultivation of maize first appeared in the Calusa area then moved north to the Mississippi plain. "

... here are examples of Mississipian  platform mound  miss. platform.jpg   and early Mayan platform mound early mayan.JPG

Pretty similar huh?

might as well add link:
http://www.examiner....ya-architecture

Edited by lightly, 26 December 2012 - 11:32 PM.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#5    DieChecker

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 11:52 PM

So the Maya collapsed around 1000 AD, then moved to Georgia and disappeared Again before Europeans started showing up in ernest in the 16th century? Possible, I guess, but I'd like to see a lot more data points. Any small time artifacts or structures could be the result of a single traveler, or a family of travelers.

Uhhhhh.... Watched the video clip about Finding the Maya in Georgia off the America Unearthed site and the background music made it almost unwatchable. Very LOUD.

From the video.... "On our last pass... I saw some bare rock... Toward the top of the mountain. Could that be Mayan ruins??...."

Uhhhh..... If there is going to be bare rock, it will be at the top of the mountain....
http://www.history.c...erica-unearthed


The host is kind of a Fringe author/scientist.
http://en.wikipedia....Scott_F._Wolter
He is convinced that the Kennsington Runestone is a real artifact and that it was put there by the Templars and that basically Columbus came looking for it.

Edited by DieChecker, 27 December 2012 - 12:00 AM.

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#6    lightly

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 01:00 AM

http://www.epa.gov/g...urces/miss.html


Mississippian Cultures (900 AD to 1,700 AD)

The Mississippian Culture was the dominant culture during this period in what is now the eastern United States. It's origins are probably about 900 to 1,000 AD, and remnants of their culture survived to the time of the early French explorers in the late seventh century.


Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#7    Abramelin

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:25 AM

View Postlightly, on 26 December 2012 - 11:19 PM, said:

very interesting Abramelin, i like this bit from your linked PDF :   "This discussion of prehistoric Indian mounds has been centered on the Florida Indians, with emphasis on the Calusa, as geographically the nearest and most probable point of contact. However, it should be noted that similar prehistoric mound building was practiced by Indians who peopled the Mississippi drainage plain (consequently known as the Mississippian culture) as far north as Illinois and Ohio (Swanton 1946). The current consensus is that the Mississippian mound building preceded that of the mound builders in Florida, but this study suggests that the first mounds, influenced by the Maya, were built by the Calusa and the mound building culture moved north at a later date. As noted earlier this agrees with Sears s (1982) findings that the cultivation of maize first appeared in the Calusa area then moved north to the Mississippi plain. "

... here are examples of Mississipian  platform mound  Attachment miss. platform.jpg  and early Mayan platform mound Attachment early mayan.JPG

Pretty similar huh?

might as well add link:
http://www.examiner....ya-architecture

Yes, you'd think these Chontal Maya did spread their culture that far north. I don't know why that should be a big thing: there is proof these Chontal Maya traded with and settled on every coast of the Caribbean and its islands.

If they settled in Florida or traded with Florida, Georgia is not that far away.


#8    Abramelin

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:27 AM

View PostDieChecker, on 26 December 2012 - 11:52 PM, said:

So the Maya collapsed around 1000 AD, then moved to Georgia and disappeared Again before Europeans started showing up in ernest in the 16th century? Possible, I guess, but I'd like to see a lot more data points. Any small time artifacts or structures could be the result of a single traveler, or a family of travelers.

<snip>


The Maya culture collapsed ages earlier it is now thought, like in the 7th century CE:

http://en.wikipedia....c_Maya_collapse


#9    lightly

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 12:51 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 27 December 2012 - 03:25 AM, said:

Yes, you'd think these Chontal Maya did spread their culture that far north. I don't know why that should be a big thing: there is proof these Chontal Maya traded with and settled on every coast of the Caribbean and its islands.

If they settled in Florida or traded with Florida, Georgia is not that far away.

  right...   it's connected to Florida  and  the  Atlantic Coast. Everybody came from somewhere..they are all connected... we just give them different names  for different time periods and areas of occupation?   I'm pretty sure no one called themselves  "mississipians".

Edited by lightly, 27 December 2012 - 12:51 PM.

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#10    Abramelin

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 12:59 PM

View Postlightly, on 27 December 2012 - 12:51 PM, said:

  right...   it's connected to Florida  and  the  Atlantic Coast. Everybody came from somewhere..they are all connected... we just give them different names  for different time periods and areas of occupation?   I'm pretty sure no one called themselves  "mississipians".

These Chontal Maya have an interesting name:

The Chontal Maya are an indigenous people of the Mexican state of Tabasco. "Chontal", from the Nahuatl word for chontalli, which means "foreigner", has been applied to various ethnic groups in Mexico. The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco", but writers about them refer to them as the Chontal of Centla, the Tabasco Chontal, or in Spanish, Chontales. They consider themselves the descendants of the Olmecs, and are not related to the Oaxacan Chontal.

http://en.wikipedia....tal_Maya_people


"The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco", but writers about them refer to them as the Chontal of Centla."

Does that resemble any name of a tribe in Florida or Georgia that you know of, Lightly?


#11    Hasina

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 02:19 PM

I have no problem with going back and reexamining history. I do have a problem if you go into it thinking 'everything that's been told is wrong, thus it's worthless', and then goes off on their own half-baked theories because it's not the 'official' version of history, and that makes it okay, because, ya know, conspiracy~

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#12    Abramelin

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 02:54 PM

View PostHasina, on 27 December 2012 - 02:19 PM, said:

I have no problem with going back and reexamining history. I do have a problem if you go into it thinking 'everything that's been told is wrong, thus it's worthless', and then goes off on their own half-baked theories because it's not the 'official' version of history, and that makes it okay, because, ya know, conspiracy~

But no one did in this thread, not yet that is.


#13    Child of Bast

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:17 PM

Yes, Hasina, that's exactly the attitude of this forensic geologist. In his mind, everything we've been taught must be thrown out the window as false only on his word. Don't think this is the type of show I want to watch. And last time I looked, Indiana Jones was an archaeologist, not a forensic geologist.

View PostAbramelin, on 27 December 2012 - 02:54 PM, said:

But no one did in this thread, not yet that is.

She's referring to the television show, which is the topic of the thread.

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#14    Hasina

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:20 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 27 December 2012 - 02:54 PM, said:



But no one did in this thread, not yet that is.
True, no one in the thread has. I blame my paranoia towards the History Channel and the 'reexamining' on that Ancient Aliens show. Where, for them, 'reexamining' means, 'aliens did it'.

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#15    Abramelin

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:31 PM

View PostHasina, on 27 December 2012 - 03:20 PM, said:

True, no one in the thread has. I blame my paranoia towards the History Channel and the 'reexamining' on that Ancient Aliens show. Where, for them, 'reexamining' means, 'aliens did it'.

I live in the Netherlands, and I think I should feel happy about not seeing any History Channel 'documentary' on my tv.

Of course I have watched HC videos on YouTube, and I just can't believe there are people truely stupid enough to gobble up all the drivel they are exposed to by watching HC.

OK, they make a captivating story, but my old and long dead father could make up things like that. And I believed him... when I was 7 years old or something.





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