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Curiosity - not really so curious


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#1    Zeta Reticulum

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:51 AM

Why is it that Curiosity makes much fanfare about scooping sand and its analysis and general rock studying - but when something unusual comes along such as the "flower" it is brushed aside as quickly as possible, without any examination whatsoever ?


#2    Abramelin

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:57 AM

View PostZeta Reticulum, on 07 January 2013 - 07:51 AM, said:

Why is it that Curiosity makes much fanfare about scooping sand and its analysis and general rock studying - but when something unusual comes along such as the "flower" it is brushed aside as quickly as possible, without any examination whatsoever ?

From the article:

However, this isn't the case. On putting the question to NASA spokesman Guy Webster, it appears initial analysis has confirmed it is part of the rock and not something dropped on top.

"That appears to be part of the rock, not debris from the spacecraft," Webster told Boyle in an email.


http://news.discover...wer-130104.html


#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:50 AM

I've asked this of you before Zeta Reticulum, and you failed to answer, so I'll ask again.

What methods of analysis are available to the Curiosity team?
Which of these are appropriate for this particular investigation?
How long do these investigations take?
How often is such data downloaded to Earth?
How long does it take to process the data?
Once the data is processed how much interpretation of the data is required before a conclusion can be made?
How long does it take to publish a proper, peer reviewed paper announcing these conclusions?

When you can answer those questions THEN you will be in a position to make statements saying NASA are taking too long announcing results.

Mind you if you knew the answer to those questions you wouldn't be making false and foolish accusations in the first place as you would understand why it takes months before results are published.

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#4    Rlyeh

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:34 PM

Send up your own probe, name it Gullible.





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