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The Incas, explorers of the Pacific


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#76    PersonFromPorlock

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:38 AM

View Postlightly, on 21 January 2013 - 12:02 PM, said:

   just a thought...   chickens were a part of nearly every homesite around here for a a very long time  but i've never seen a chicken in "the forest"   I'm sure it happens,  but, being domesticated they probably have lost some survival skills?

It may be that from a chicken's point of view, domesticated life is too good to leave: food, water, shelter, and no predators except for the big one you missed until it was too late. And if the farm gets attacked and destroyed, the chickens either get taken or wander around the ruins until something eats them.


#77    lightly

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:44 AM

View PostPersonFromPorlock, on 22 January 2013 - 12:38 AM, said:

It may be that from a chicken's point of view, domesticated life is too good to leave: food, water, shelter, and no predators except for the big one you missed until it was too late. And if the farm gets attacked and destroyed, the chickens either get taken or wander around the ruins until something eats them.

  Ya,  that makes sense,  from  both my and the chicken's point of view.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#78    Abramelin

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:25 AM

View PostPersonFromPorlock, on 22 January 2013 - 12:38 AM, said:

It may be that from a chicken's point of view, domesticated life is too good to leave: food, water, shelter, and no predators except for the big one you missed until it was too late. And if the farm gets attacked and destroyed, the chickens either get taken or wander around the ruins until something eats them.

Feral chickens are derived from domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) that have returned to the wild. Like the Red Junglefowl (the closest wild relative of domestic chickens), feral chickens will take flight and roost in tall trees and bushes in order to avoid predators at night.

Feral chickens, like the wild Red Junglefowl, typically form social groups composed of a dominant cockerel, several hens and subordinate cocks.


Locations famous for feral chickens

    * Bermuda
    * Fair Oaks, California
    * Galston Gorge, Australia
    * Key West, Florida
    * Kauai, Hawaii
    * Los Angeles, California
    * San Juan Bautista, California
    * Houston, Texas
    * Chicken Roundabout (A143) Bungay, Suffolk, UK [2]
    * Port Chalmers, New Zealand
    * Totton, UK
    * St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands



http://en.wikipedia....i/Feral_chicken


#79    lightly

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:00 PM

ah.. i understand now. I notice all of those places are warm, or at least survivable in the case of the UK.   It gets too cold here for a chicken of independent mind to survive the winter.




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Edited by lightly, 22 January 2013 - 01:01 PM.

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#80    PersonFromPorlock

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:00 PM

There is something extraordinarily sinister about the term "feral chicken." :D


#81    Harte

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:22 PM

Doesn't matter.  They all fear me worse than Col. Sanders.

You should see my frying pans.

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#82    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 07:15 PM

New article

The origin of the sweet potato in Polynesia has long been a mystery, since the crop was first domesticated in the Andes of South America about 8,000 years ago, and it couldn't have spread to other parts of the world until contact was made. In other words, if Europeans were indeed the first to make contact with the Americas between 500 and 1,000 years ago, then the sweet potato shouldn't be found anywhere else in the world until then.

The extensive DNA study looked at genetic samples taken from modern sweet potatoes from around the world and historical specimens kept in herbarium collections. Remarkably, the herbarium specimens included plants collected during Capt. James Cook’s 1769 visits to New Zealand and the Society Islands. The findings confirmed that sweet potatoes in Polynesia were part of a distinct lineage that were already present in the area when European voyagers introduced different lines elsewhere. In other words, sweet potatoes made it out of America before European contact.


http://www.mnn.com/e...ica-long-before


Researchers believe that Polynesian seafarers must have discovered the Americas first, long before Europeans did. The new DNA evidence, taken together with archaeological and linguistic evidence regarding the timeline of Polynesian expansion, suggests that an original contact date between 500 CE and 700 CE between Polynesia and America seems likely. That means that Polynesians would have arrived in South America even before the Norse had landed in Newfoundland.


It seems they ignore your idea Abe.

Edited by the L, 26 January 2013 - 07:17 PM.

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For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#83    Abramelin

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 09:27 AM

View Postthe L, on 26 January 2013 - 07:15 PM, said:

New article

The origin of the sweet potato in Polynesia has long been a mystery, since the crop was first domesticated in the Andes of South America about 8,000 years ago, and it couldn't have spread to other parts of the world until contact was made. In other words, if Europeans were indeed the first to make contact with the Americas between 500 and 1,000 years ago, then the sweet potato shouldn't be found anywhere else in the world until then.

The extensive DNA study looked at genetic samples taken from modern sweet potatoes from around the world and historical specimens kept in herbarium collections. Remarkably, the herbarium specimens included plants collected during Capt. James Cook’s 1769 visits to New Zealand and the Society Islands. The findings confirmed that sweet potatoes in Polynesia were part of a distinct lineage that were already present in the area when European voyagers introduced different lines elsewhere. In other words, sweet potatoes made it out of America before European contact.


http://www.mnn.com/e...ica-long-before


Researchers believe that Polynesian seafarers must have discovered the Americas first, long before Europeans did. The new DNA evidence, taken together with archaeological and linguistic evidence regarding the timeline of Polynesian expansion, suggests that an original contact date between 500 CE and 700 CE between Polynesia and America seems likely. That means that Polynesians would have arrived in South America even before the Norse had landed in Newfoundland.


It seems they ignore your idea Abe.

Well, my idea was something of a mutual 'pollination': the Polynesians influencing South Americans, and visa versa.

The Polynesians may have discovered South America ages before the Europeans did, but did they also introduce the typical megalithic style of building, like in Sacsayhuaman?

If you look at page one of this thread and the photo I posted of that wall on Easter Island, what should we think?


#84    Abramelin

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:09 AM

Who Are The Mysterious Bearded Indians? Part 1.

A Strange Tribe, With Strange Customs and Strange Physical Characteristics, Is Being Investigated in South America. Are They Truly Indians or Are They Descendants of Some Other People?

By A. HYATT VERRILL Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN magazine, June 1928.

Researched by Alan Schenker; digitized by Doug Frizzle February 2012.


http://stillwoods.bl...ed-indians.html


ELSEWHERE in this issue (page 503) the ethnographer, A. Hyatt Verrill, has described a little-known but apparently anomalous tribe of savages who inhabit an inaccessible area in Bolivia. According to his hypothesis these people are not American Indians but some of the island stocks from the distant archipelagos of the Pacific, transplanted to South America. Admittedly, a close scrutiny of the photograph reproduced above lends some support to this suspicion. How these or similar island peoples may have reached South America from across the broad Pacific has perhaps been best explained by the anthropologist, Professor G. Elliot Smith, who believes they came in large canoes. Although this "diffusionist" belief is opposed by the majority of anthropologists, it is nevertheless in good scientific standing and may yet become the accepted doctrine.

=

MY most recent expedition to Peru and Bolivia was not, as has been stated in the daily press, in search of the bearded Indians, but was primarily archeological, although large ethnological collections and valuable ethnological data were secured among the living Indians of the interior.

The bearded Indians were merely a side issue. Moreover, I lay no claim to having "discovered" them, and neither are they a "new" race. In fact they have been known, or rather rumored, to exist for fully 200 years; but I believe I am the first to secure ethnological specimens and notes of the tribe and to bring them to the attention of science.

SCIENTIFICALLY, the bearded Indians are of the greatest interest, being in many ways unique, and may prove to be the key that will unlock the mystery of the origin of man in South America. Even to the casual observer they are strikingly un-Indian in appearance and have a far greater resemblance to inhabitants of the South Sea Islands than to any aborigines of America.

I have long held to the opinion that the Indians of western South America were of Oceanian and not Asiatic origin, and I am convinced that a further study of the bearded Indians will go far towards proving this opinion. The mere fact that the men are bearded is by no means the most important peculiarity of the tribe, although to the public it might seem so. Many, in fact nearly all, Indians possess beards, but as a rule these are shaved off or plucked out; and when allowed to grow, the beard is thin, scant, stiff and wiry.

The beards of the bearded Indians, however, are heavy, luxuriant, bushy, fine, soft, and slightly wavy; as is the hair on the heads. Neither are their features, their bodies nor the shapes of the heads Indian, although a comparison of their cranial measurements with those of Oceanian tribes will be necessary before direct relationships can be established or disproved.

In height they are well above the average forest Indians of South America, and in color they are darker and more of a brown than an ochre or red.

=

The dialect of these bearded Indians is wholly unlike any of those of the neighboring tribes. It is low and guttural but not inharmonious, and is spoken in a sing-song monotone.

The vocabulary obtained shows many striking resemblances to dialects of the Pacific archipelagos, some of the words being almost identical and having precisely the same meanings. This is not, however, confined to this tribe, for words in many of the Indian languages of western South America, even the Quichua and Aimara, in fact, show similar resemblances; all of which tends to sustain the theory that these people are all descendants of migrants from Oceania, although doubtless more or less mixed with the races of Asiatic origin farther north.

Posted Image

Edited by Abramelin, 06 February 2013 - 09:10 AM.


#85    lightly

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 10:31 PM

Interesting stuff Abramelin,    almost identical words with same meaning  shared by Eastern 'Polynesians' and South Americans.  (Some might argue recent contact for that?)

I've been trying to find out , without much success, about ancient and  traditional  S.E. Asian and Western Pacific watercraft    .. and..  Eastern Pacific watercraft.

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#86    Abramelin

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 07:52 AM

View Postlightly, on 07 February 2013 - 10:31 PM, said:

Interesting stuff Abramelin, almost identical words with same meaning  shared by Eastern 'Polynesians' and South Americans.  (Some might argue recent contact for that?)

I've been trying to find out , without much success, about ancient and  traditional  S.E. Asian and Western Pacific watercraft .. and..  Eastern Pacific watercraft.

I don't think it's recent contact: from the looks of it this tribe lived in east Bolivia, so they must have first crossed the Andes after they arrived at the west coast of South America,


#87    The_Spartan

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 07:43 PM

GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRr. :td:

Indians come from India. :yes:

All others will be served copyright notices!!!

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#88    PersonFromPorlock

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:20 PM

View PostThe_Spartan, on 08 February 2013 - 07:43 PM, said:

GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRr. :td:

Indians come from India. :yes:

All others will be served copyright notices!!!

I like "Amerindian" or "Amerind" for most American natives. I'm not sure that fits the 'Polynesian' Indians, though.


#89    Abramelin

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 10:51 PM

View PostThe_Spartan, on 08 February 2013 - 07:43 PM, said:

GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRr. :td:

Indians come from India. :yes:

All others will be served copyright notices!!!

I will bet you know that some of your countrymen claimed that their ancestors (and so your ancestors) discovered the Americas, thousands of years after the Siberian Asians did, and long before any Europeans did.

So, in a way, calling Native Americans "Indians" is not that wrong.

IF (-BIG if-) your countrymen will be proven to be right, that is.



.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 February 2013 - 11:02 PM.


#90    third_eye

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 11:47 PM

I blame our collective nomadic ancestors ... they just can't sit still .... what was it that Bill Bryson puts it ? " The Restless Ape " ?

Maybe "Restless Hominid" would've been better apt, there are more than many Restless Apes now still but haven't rambled further than the next fruiting tree within reach

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