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Florida holds Burmese python hunting contest

burmese python florida everglades python challenge

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#1    Still Waters

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 07:20 PM

The US state of Florida is set to begin a competitive Burmese python hunt, in an attempt to rid the Everglades wetlands of the invasive species.

The month-long contest, called the python Challenge, begins on Saturday.

About 550 people have signed up to compete for two prizes: $1,000 (£620) for the longest python killed and $1,500 for the most pythons taken.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...canada-20994982

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#2    Simbi Laveau

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 07:32 PM

y_y
May a few hunters get swallowed whole for their troubles

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#3    Odin11

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 07:54 PM

View PostSimbi Laveau, on 12 January 2013 - 07:32 PM, said:

y_y
May a few hunters get swallowed whole for their troubles

They're invasive species; they're wreaking havoc on the Everglades. Hopefully the people hunting them will also eat them and use the skin.

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#4    GreenmansGod

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 08:38 PM

If I was able I would be out there catching them.  I don't care what they do with them. Snake skins boots would be nice, though.

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#5    Ashotep

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 10:19 PM

They need to have a bounty on them until their gone.


#6    and then

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 02:40 AM

From what I've heard they are ravaging the ecosystem of the Glades.  It's a shame they were introduced so casually.  Feral hogs are doing similar damage in the southeastern US.  Hunters don't even require a license or observe a posted season.  They are killed as "varmits".  They breed at such a pace that even then they are out of control.

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#7    supervike

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:57 AM

Yeah, the feral pigs are also beginning to move north.  I've got a couple of buddies that go down and hunt them.


#8    and then

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 12:48 PM

View Postsupervike, on 13 January 2013 - 06:57 AM, said:

Yeah, the feral pigs are also beginning to move north.  I've got a couple of buddies that go down and hunt them.
The farmers here are being hit hard by them.  They consume an incredible amount of crops when left alone.  It's a mess!  And frankly, it's no fun coming up on one without at least a large handgun on your hip ;)

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#9    PhoenixBird88

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 12:57 PM

As a snake breeder and Floridian, I have lots of mixed emotions about this kind of thing. Yes, Burmese pythons are an invasive and potentially dangerous species, as theyll eat basically anything...and yes, there needs to be some form of population control. However, things like "wreaking havoc" and "ravaging the ecosystem" are highly far fetched. The number of actual Burms in the Everglades is always highly exaggerated, the numbers reported will always reflect where the funding came from. They also tend to have a die off in the winter, it doesnt get very cold here in S. Florida but it gets cold enough to kill or cause harm to big snakes who are not specifically adapted to the climate. Ive been on herp trips to the Glades, and we were LOOKING for Burms and didnt come across a single one..which is apparently very common among other herpers as well.

Now a new issue, which has not gotten much attention until recently is the fact that African Rock pythons are also an invassive species issue down here in FL. Now the real problem is since both the Burm and the African Rock are invading the same areas, interbreeding/hyrbridization may occur and produce a more adaptable and ecologically harmful species(also, it would be a beast of a snake). Florida has recently passed a law putting these, and a few other python species on a Species of Concern list and it is now required you have a state issued license to own, sell, buy or breed these large pythons...which i agreed with, while a large number of other herpers did not(as it did hurt a lot of peoples livelyhood). I beleive if they had inplemented this years ago, the invasion wouldnt have reached this point.


#10    GreenmansGod

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 03:43 PM

We have problem with Montor lizards in SW Florida.  Most the invasive reptiles and fish has come from the pet trade. I think there needs to be better control of it.  But I agree it is has come to little to late. :hmm:

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#11    thewild

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 03:52 PM

Don't forget that many pet shops in Miami and other cities were knocked down by hurricanes, allowing snakes and other critters to flee. It isn't all irresponsible pet owners.

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#12    supervike

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:01 PM

View Postthewild, on 13 January 2013 - 03:52 PM, said:

Don't forget that many pet shops in Miami and other cities were knocked down by hurricanes, allowing snakes and other critters to flee. It isn't all irresponsible pet owners.

I'm not sure if a snake or any sort of reptile should even be a pet.  To each their own, of course, but what could one possible get out of having a reptile as one?  It seems to me more of an 'accessory' than a real pet.


#13    PhoenixBird88

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:35 PM

View Postsupervike, on 13 January 2013 - 06:01 PM, said:

I'm not sure if a snake or any sort of reptile should even be a pet.  To each their own, of course, but what could one possible get out of having a reptile as one?  It seems to me more of an 'accessory' than a real pet.

Companionship, entertainment, converation starter, etc. Same with all other pets, rather it be a cat, dog, bird, rat, snake, lizard, etc. Supervike, I feel the same about rats and Arachnids/Insects that youre stating about reptiles. To me theyre pest, vermen, and snake food, i dont see why anyone would have them as pets but people do and theyre popular pets...but other people feel they make good companions and have personality. A lot of people, see reptiles as cold, unfriendly, no personality, and nasty...yet theyre highly popular pets and always have been. Of course I disagree with people who see negative in reptile ownership having spent so much time with them myself. I see different personalities in each animal from the time they hatch, and see changes from growing up all the way to adulthood. Iguanas stand out a lot as well, they are very personable reptiles and remind me of dogs if theyre treated right. Unlike most reptiles who prefer seclusion, an Iguana will usually seek out and be loyal to its owner.


#14    Paracelse

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:52 PM

View PostDarkwind, on 12 January 2013 - 08:38 PM, said:

If I was able I would be out there catching them.  I don't care what they do with them. Snake skins boots would be nice, though.
I had some rattler BBQ before .. was pretty tasty... wonder if Burmese python tastes good??? Worth a trial .... Love cooking can you tell??? :D

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#15    Odin11

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 08:26 PM

View Postand then, on 13 January 2013 - 02:40 AM, said:

From what I've heard they are ravaging the ecosystem of the Glades.  It's a shame they were introduced so casually.  Feral hogs are doing similar damage in the southeastern US.  Hunters don't even require a license or observe a posted season.  They are killed as "varmits".  They breed at such a pace that even then they are out of control.

We have feral hogs up here in Northern Michigan as well. No license or posted season needed too, they are kill on sight. Which is a good thing because they're sooooo good to eat. lol

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Geology shows that fossils are of different ages. Paleontology shows a fossil sequence, the list of species represented changes through time. Taxonomy shows biological relationships among species. Evolution is the explanation that threads it all together. Creationism is the practice of squeezing one's eyes shut and wailing "Does not!" ~Author Unknown




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