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Global Elite Rush to Control Water Worldwide


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#1    jugoso

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:17 PM

A disturbing trend in the water sector is accelerating worldwide. The new “water barons” --- the Wall Street banks and elitist multibillionaires --- are buying up water all over the world at unprecedented pace. Familiar mega-banks and investing powerhouses such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan Chase, Citigroup, UBS, Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse, Macquarie Bank, Barclays Bank, the Blackstone Group, Allianz, and HSBC Bank, among others, are consolidating their control over water. Wealthy tycoons such as T. Boone Pickens, former President George H.W. Bush and his family, Hong Kong’s Li Ka-shing, Philippines’ Manuel V. Pangilinan and other Filipino billionaires, and others are also buying thousands of acres of land with aquifers, lakes, water rights, water utilities, and shares in water engineering and technology companies all over the world.

The second disturbing trend is that while the new water barons are buying up water all over the world, governments are moving fast to limit citizens’ ability to become water self-sufficient (as evidenced by the well-publicized Gary Harrington’s case in Oregon, in which the state criminalized the collection of rainwater in three ponds located on his private land, by convicting him on nine counts and sentencing him for 30 days in jail). Let’s put this criminalization in perspective:

Billionaire T. Boone Pickens owned more water rights than any other individuals in America, with rights over enough of the Ogallala Aquifer to drain approximately 200,000 acre-feet (or 65 billion gallons of water) a year. But ordinary citizen Gary Harrington cannot collect rainwater runoff on 170 acres of his private land.

It’s a strange New World Order in which multibillionaires and elitist banks can own aquifers and lakes, but ordinary citizens cannot even collect rainwater and snow runoff in their own backyards and private lands.


http://www.marketora...ticle38167.html

http://www.environme...apping-project/

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#2    Mr.United_Nations

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:20 PM

Who would invest in them?


#3    freetoroam

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:26 PM

read a few years back about the biggest natural under ground water reserve in Israel. Will need to hunt this story down.


#4    Professor T

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 01:25 AM

Bingo.


#5    AsteroidX

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 01:38 AM

This has been going on for decades now. Nothing new.


#6    SpiritWriter

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 02:17 AM

View Postjugoso, on 19 January 2013 - 09:17 PM, said:

A disturbing trend in the water sector is accelerating worldwide. The new “water barons” --- the Wall Street banks and elitist multibillionaires --- are buying up water all over the world at unprecedented pace. Familiar mega-banks and investing powerhouses such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan Chase, Citigroup, UBS, Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse, Macquarie Bank, Barclays Bank, the Blackstone Group, Allianz, and HSBC Bank, among others, are consolidating their control over water. Wealthy tycoons such as T. Boone Pickens, former President George H.W. Bush and his family, Hong Kong’s Li Ka-shing, Philippines’ Manuel V. Pangilinan and other Filipino billionaires, and others are also buying thousands of acres of land with aquifers, lakes, water rights, water utilities, and shares in water engineering and technology companies all over the world.

The second disturbing trend is that while the new water barons are buying up water all over the world, governments are moving fast to limit citizens’ ability to become water self-sufficient (as evidenced by the well-publicized Gary Harrington’s case in Oregon, in which the state criminalized the collection of rainwater in three ponds located on his private land, by convicting him on nine counts and sentencing him for 30 days in jail). Let’s put this criminalization in perspective:

Billionaire T. Boone Pickens owned more water rights than any other individuals in America, with rights over enough of the Ogallala Aquifer to drain approximately 200,000 acre-feet (or 65 billion gallons of water) a year. But ordinary citizen Gary Harrington cannot collect rainwater runoff on 170 acres of his private land.

It’s a strange New World Order in which multibillionaires and elitist banks can own aquifers and lakes, but ordinary citizens cannot even collect rainwater and snow runoff in their own backyards and private lands.


http://www.marketora...ticle38167.html

http://www.environme...apping-project/

I live in a place that is said to have the best water in the world, and my water's paid for so I cant  relate quite yet

I was going to cancel but accidently posted.. anyway this sh makes me very mad

Edited by SpiritWriter, 25 January 2013 - 02:19 AM.

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#7    jugoso

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 02:45 AM

View PostAsteroidX, on 25 January 2013 - 01:38 AM, said:

This has been going on for decades now. Nothing new.

Actually, if you read the article it talks about some things that are new and that have been happening over the last decade and are worth paying attention to IMO.

Quote


in September 2003, Goldman Sachs partnered with one of the world’s largest private-equity firm Blackstone Group and Apollo Management to acquire Ondeo Nalco (a leading company in providing water-treatment and process chemicals and services, with more than 10,000 employees and operations in 130 countries) from French water corporation Suez S.A. for U.S.$4.2 billion.


Quote


In March 2012, Goldman Sachs was eyeing Veolia’s UK water utility business, estimated at £1.2 billion, and in July it successfully bought Veolia Water, which serves 3.5 million people in southeastern England.


Quote


Citigroup’s top economist Willem Buitler said in 2011 that the water market will soon be hotter the oil market:
“Water as an asset class will, in my view, become eventually the single most important physical-commodity based asset class, dwarfing oil, copper, agricultural commodities and precious metals.”
Specifically, a lucrative opportunity in water is in hydraulic fracturing (or fracking), as it generates massive demand for water and water services. Each oil well developed requires 3 to 5 million gallons of water, and 80% of this water cannot be reused because it’s three to 10 times saltier than seawater. Citigroup recommends water-rights owners sell water to fracking companies instead of to farmers because water for fracking can be sold for as much as $3,000 per acre-foot instead of only $50 per acre/foot to farmers.


Other recent purchases worth noting:

Quote


In summer 2011, the Hong Kong multibillionaire tycoon Li Ka-shing who owns Cheung Kong Infrastructure (CKI), bought Northumbrian Water, which serves 2.6 million people in northeastern England, for $3.9 billion (see this and this).

CKI also sold Cambridge Water for £74 million to HSBC in 2011. Not satisfied with controlling the water sector, in 2010, CKI with a consortium bought EDF’s power networks in UK for £5.8 billion.

Former President George H.W. Bush’s Family Bought 300,000 Acres on South America’s and World’s Largest Aquifer, Acuifero Guaraní



There have also been major purchases and water-targeted investment funds created within the last five years. Some of the major players and funds are

JPMorgan Chase, Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse Water Index, HSBC Water, Waste, and Pollution Control Index, Merrill Lynch China Water Index, S&P Global Water Index, First Trust ISE Water Index Fund (FIW), International Securities Exchange’s ISE-B&S Water Index.

If you think the clamour for oil is big, what´s going to happen when we are dealing with a resource that we truly can´t live without??

Edited by jugoso, 25 January 2013 - 03:03 AM.

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#8    AsteroidX

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 02:52 AM

I drive the I-5 corridor. You can see the direct effect of federal intervention into water rights for what us to be be productive green belt farms. Dams in my own state have decimated the Salmon population. Yes its a major deal.

Fortunately we get enough here that water rights arent an issue. But I get it.

Green yards and fountains abound in Las Vegas. That should be a crime unless its recycled bath water.


#9    Abramelin

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:02 AM

Almost looks like the plot for the James Bond movie "Quantum of Solace" (2008).


#10    EllJay

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:21 AM

View Postjugoso, on 19 January 2013 - 09:17 PM, said:

A disturbing trend in the water sector is accelerating worldwide. The new “water barons” --- the Wall Street banks and elitist multibillionaires --- are buying up water all over the world at unprecedented pace. Familiar mega-banks and investing powerhouses such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan Chase, Citigroup, UBS, Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse, Macquarie Bank, Barclays Bank, the Blackstone Group, Allianz, and HSBC Bank, among others, are consolidating their control over water. Wealthy tycoons such as T. Boone Pickens, former President George H.W. Bush and his family, Hong Kong’s Li Ka-shing, Philippines’ Manuel V. Pangilinan and other Filipino billionaires, and others are also buying thousands of acres of land with aquifers, lakes, water rights, water utilities, and shares in water engineering and technology companies all over the world.

The second disturbing trend is that while the new water barons are buying up water all over the world, governments are moving fast to limit citizens’ ability to become water self-sufficient (as evidenced by the well-publicized Gary Harrington’s case in Oregon, in which the state criminalized the collection of rainwater in three ponds located on his private land, by convicting him on nine counts and sentencing him for 30 days in jail). Let’s put this criminalization in perspective:

Billionaire T. Boone Pickens owned more water rights than any other individuals in America, with rights over enough of the Ogallala Aquifer to drain approximately 200,000 acre-feet (or 65 billion gallons of water) a year. But ordinary citizen Gary Harrington cannot collect rainwater runoff on 170 acres of his private land.

It’s a strange New World Order in which multibillionaires and elitist banks can own aquifers and lakes, but ordinary citizens cannot even collect rainwater and snow runoff in their own backyards and private lands.


http://www.marketora...ticle38167.html

http://www.environme...apping-project/

This really sickens my physically. MF-ing scum of the earth.
Reminds me of when the World Bank forced the Bolivian government to privatize their water supply and hand it over to two American and French multinational corporations.

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#11    Raptor Witness

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 05:21 AM

They're buying hydrogen and oxygen perhaps, hoping for a miracle catatyst.



Edited by Raptor Witness, 26 January 2013 - 05:22 AM.

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#12    Babe Ruth

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 02:26 PM

I have long thought that there will come a time on this planet when water is far more valuable than oil.


#13    questionmark

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 03:48 PM

View PostBabe Ruth, on 26 January 2013 - 02:26 PM, said:

I have long thought that there will come a time on this planet when water is far more valuable than oil.

Yes, but that will make the elites look very dumb as that will be the time when water will be nationalized in most of the world.

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#14    Babe Ruth

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 08:24 PM

An interesting point Q.


#15    Doug1o29

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 04:36 PM

View PostAsteroidX, on 25 January 2013 - 01:38 AM, said:

This has been going on for decades now. Nothing new.
The Western United States are under a system of water law called "prior rights" in which all water in a stream was owned by the original homesteader.  Over the years that homesteader and his heirs and assigns have sold off land and/or water rights to others.  The water goes first to the oldest right, then to the next oldest right and so on until either everybody has water or there is none left.  The system is great if you own the priority right, but it's terrible if it's a drought year and you own the last right.  This system has been in place since statehood in most areas.  The Spanish Land Grants in Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and California had the prior right to all water on their lands.  This right was recognized by the Treaty of Hidalgo.  That system has dovetailed nicely with the modern version of prior rights.

The big problem with western water rights over the last century stems from the use of the callendar year 1900 as the basis for allocating those rights.  1900 was a drought year, so that by the time every prior right takes its water out of the stream, there isn't any left for the late-comers.  This problem is particularly acute on the Colorado River where there frequently wasn't enough water to honor treaty commitments to Mexico, which often got nothing.  But Mexico solved the problem:  it sold its water rights to Los Angeles.

The fellow in Oregon ran into trouble because once water is in a container (A pond is a container.), it is owned by the person who has the prior rights.  What he was doing is stealing water.  If you want to use water before it becomes somebody's property, you need to grow something with it, like a crop, or water your cattle.  As long as you don't put it in a container, nobody owns it.  Prior rights even applies to the rainwater running off your roof:  somebody else may own it.

In the Eastern United States, water is allocated under "riparian rights," bascially, first-come-first served.  In these areas, if there is water in the stream, you can use it until its gone.

Edited by Doug1o29, 28 January 2013 - 04:39 PM.

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