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Earth loses status as Goldilocks world


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#16    CrimsonKing

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:32 AM

View PostHazzard, on 31 January 2013 - 03:41 PM, said:

Unfortunately, any route you take to the stars will be slow, even if you are powered by the most powerful nuclear propulsion technology…

A trip to Proxima Centauri, the closest star (4.22 light years from Earth) would take Voyager 1  73000 years.


Agreed,i think if we ever plan to go to another star we will have to figure out a way to bend space and time to achieve it.Propulsion tech i doubt will ever get us there.

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#17    Harte

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 06:13 AM

View PostOverpopulation, on 01 February 2013 - 12:48 AM, said:

Great discovery. But who knows their could be planets outside this zone, that could have evolved life just in a different way we would suspect, but still with natural selection of course.
And in fact it's possible for life as we know it to also evolve outside the "goldilocks zone."

Not like us, but life like life on Earth.

For example, tidal forces can keep water warm enough to stay liquid underneath ice covers, such as is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa.

In other words, liquid water could exist in many places outside habitable zones, for many different reasons.

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Edited by Harte, 03 February 2013 - 06:20 AM.

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#18    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 11:03 AM

View PostHarte, on 03 February 2013 - 06:13 AM, said:

And in fact it's possible for life as we know it to also evolve outside the "goldilocks zone."
I would say that the term "in fact" is a little strong. It is hypothetically possible as it is believed that such conditions could exist BUT we have not yet the absolute proof that such conditions ACTUALLY exist or that life has/can actually form there.

In my opinion, this is why we need to further study the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn and fill in the gaps in our knowledge.

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#19    Harte

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 01:15 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 03 February 2013 - 11:03 AM, said:

I would say that the term "in fact" is a little strong. It is hypothetically possible as it is believed that such conditions could exist BUT we have not yet the absolute proof that such conditions ACTUALLY exist or that life has/can actually form there.

In my opinion, this is why we need to further study the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn and fill in the gaps in our knowledge.

Okay, I can buy that.

Fact is too strong of a word... for now.

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#20    Uncle Sam

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 12:27 PM

If Earth as a planet did lose its goldilock status, I don't know if I should be worried or just shrug it off.

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#21    danielost

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 03:32 PM

View Postmfrmboy, on 31 January 2013 - 03:14 PM, said:

I have been told that with our current technology it would take to long for a probe or whatever to get to one of these planets. If I remember correctly hundreds of years.

Thousands of years.  That is just to get to the closest at 4.5 light years.  Further we can't detect planets around a star that close.

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#22    Frank Merton

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 03:59 PM

The technology is coming where we will be able to get spectra of planets orbiting close stars.  Over time we will extend this ability outward.  This is far more likely than probes to be the route we will use, since we look at light that has already spent all the time needed to get to us.


#23    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 04:07 PM

View Postdanielost, on 03 March 2013 - 03:32 PM, said:

Thousands of years.  That is just to get to the closest at 4.5 light years.
As Hazzard has already correctly pointed out it would take tens of thousands of years to reach the nearest star which is 4.2 light years away.

View Postdanielost, on 03 March 2013 - 03:32 PM, said:

Further we can't detect planets around a star that close.
What?
Not only can we detect planets around a star that close, we HAVE detected planets around a star that close, see this topic:
Earth Mass Planet Orbits Alpha Centauri B

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#24    bison

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 04:25 PM

The habitable zone is a rather crude estimate of a more nuanced situation. Even a little additional carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of a planet farther out than this zone could make for an eminently habitable world. A planet with a thin, rather dry atmosphere, which loses heat with greater than usual efficiency might be habitable, even if nearer a star than its habitable zone.


#25    danielost

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 05:47 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 03 March 2013 - 04:07 PM, said:


As Hazzard has already correctly pointed out it would take tens of thousands of years to reach the nearest star which is 4.2 light years away.


What?
Not only can we detect planets around a star that close, we HAVE detected planets around a star that close, see this topic:
Earth Mass Planet Orbits Alpha Centauri B

I stand corrected.  Last I heard the star hd to be 100 light years out.

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#26    Harte

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 03:20 AM

View PostUncle Sam, on 03 March 2013 - 12:27 PM, said:

If Earth as a planet did lose its goldilock status, I don't know if I should be worried or just shrug it off.

You should just try the other bowl of prridge, the other chair, or the other bed.

Not necessesarily in that order, depending on who is with you at the time, of course.

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#27    Zeta Reticulum

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 12:01 AM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 03 March 2013 - 04:07 PM, said:

As Hazzard has already correctly pointed out it would take tens of thousands of years to reach the nearest star which is 4.2 light years away.
And it used to take months of sea travel to get across the earths oceans by sail. Now we have a previously unheard of technology (jet propulsion).
Another technology will come along, either by invention or by capture.





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