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How do you deal with death?


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#16    JeremyjJstone

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 08:12 AM

I have a program in my head where I let go of all my body tension, and send out the electric signals to momentarily relax, each time some crazy driver sideswipes me on my bike, because my immortal soul is a trillion zilliom times stronger than these bones or that metal.

If you really want to confront your mortality, buy a radio and film yourself destroying it. That would be "it". (imagine the radio feels pain for brutal honesty about everything).

Edited by JeremyjJstone, 10 February 2013 - 08:14 AM.


#17    Frank Merton

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 08:14 AM

This is grief, and only time relieves it, not very well. The only way to avoid it is to never get attached.  Do you want that kind of life?


#18    robinrenee

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 06:00 PM

View PostJeremyjJstone, on 10 February 2013 - 08:12 AM, said:

I have a program in my head where I let go of all my body tension, and send out the electric signals to momentarily relax, each time some crazy driver sideswipes me on my bike, because my immortal soul is a trillion zilliom times stronger than these bones or that metal.

If you really want to confront your mortality, buy a radio and film yourself destroying it. That would be "it". (imagine the radio feels pain for brutal honesty about everything).


Or if you want to confront your immortality ...  using your analogy of a radio ... try to destroy the radio signal (your soul) by destroying the radio (your physical body).

The pale girl watched him cautiously and then she asked, "Has my baby come back as a ghost?"

Solomon's eyes brightened as he answered, "Yes, a magnificent one!"


A heartwarming ghost story, Solomon the Midwife: Appalachian Afterlife, is free online at  http://solomon-the-m...e.blogspot.com

#19    Sean93

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 01:09 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 10 February 2013 - 08:14 AM, said:

This is grief, and only time relieves it, not very well. The only way to avoid it is to never get attached.  Do you want that kind of life?

Yes, actually. Attachment, I have found, comes with too much emotional baggage and duty. It's the reason I'm hoping to stay single for life.

Some people think it's worth it though so to each his own.

"Regarding life, the wisest men of all ages have judged it alike: It is worthless."

"Be peaceful, be courteous, respect everyone; but if someone puts his hand on you, send him to the cemetery."

#20    Lilly

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 01:34 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 07 February 2013 - 07:28 AM, said:

Now that is not something I have experienced.  Old people want to live as much as young people, and our lives are so short that it hardly is a real difference.

I've lost both my parents and a daughter. Trust me, having your child die is worse than losing an elderly parent. Sure, I mourn for them all, but at least my parents had good long lives...not so for my daughter.

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#21    Professor T

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 01:55 AM

I've lost both of my parents.. And both deaths were something that I was ready for..

I can't imagine what it would be like to loose a child..

death isn't something I fear for myself, but it's something I fear having to face with others.. *Shrugs* sound's shallow but I assure you it's not, I don't see it as an end, more a transformation...


#22    little_dreamer

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:18 AM

I was sheltered from death for a long time.   I didn't know anyone personally who died until about 15 years ago.  The older you get, the more encounters with death that you experience.   My parents are getting older and I think it would disturb me the most if they died.

I've been to cemeteries (not to visit loved ones) and they don't bother me yet.  You might say I have respect and compassion for those who died - they don't scare me.  That's how I feel when I walk around a cemetery.

I am another anonymous face in the crowd. I am just another tiny wheel in the machinery of the world I live in.

#23    coolguy

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:23 AM

i dont take death well, my dad passed away in 08 and it was rough. and iam still kinda not over it. my mom said i changed /


#24    Frank Merton

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:31 AM

I'm the only one of my generation left now; my parents and wife and siblings are all gone, and we were never able to have children.  However, I have nieces and nephews and some of their families and five adopted children (soon to become six I hope) living here, so it is a full house, and me, not all that old (although actually quite old by the standards that prevailed when I was growing up).

I kinda hope I'm then next to go, but would like to put that off for a good long while.


#25    CrimsonKing

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:53 AM

View PostSean93, on 07 February 2013 - 12:59 AM, said:

When a loved one dies, how do you react/have reacted? Be honest about it, it makes for an interesting discussion.  

For me, all my emotions only come out when I by myself, I hate being sentimental around others and try my best to avoid it at all costs. I don't cry at funerals although I almost felt like doing so at My Grandfathers a few months back simply because I was with him hours before he died and he said to me "For the first time in a while, I feel better". It's almost surreal in a way if you've ever experienced it, getting the news that someone you were talking with a few hours ago has died suddenly. I felt numb and somewhat emotionless when the paramedics were trying to resuscitate him, seeing everyone crying and hugging, it's all weird the way people act at these times and I don't like it, my little sister looked at me and said "Why aren't you crying?" which kinda' annyed me because she said it as if it was some requirement although I understand where she's coming from in a way. The only time I felt like tearing was when I found myself in my Grandfathers' empty home. I opened his DVD player to put in a DVD of my own and there was his favorite film, that starred Ava Gardner, his favorite actress; many times I'd sit with him when he was drunk on whiskey and he'd watch the damn thing over and over again, that's the closest I've come to crying at death at a mature age but as it stands, death to me is a natural thing that should be accepted and gotten over with as soon as possible. But that's my take.

I personally don't like all the crying and misery and mopping around and so reserve it, it's handier that way. I bet all the loved ones who have passed would want us to get on with our lives and not waste away, of course it might be hard to do for some people and that's understandable if you're that kinda' person. I guess if I were a religious person I'd find more solace in death but considering I'm not, I still find a bit of comfort knowing that it'll all be over, life I mean in terms of all the **** we have to pull through only to die in the end; imagine everlasting peace in a void of nothing. To go back to my grandfather for a second: he was a sever worrier and got upset at small things so in that sense, I'm glad he's at peace now, even if my idea of peace isn't all fine wine, harps and cherubs.

So fire away.

I prefer physical pain over mental pain,though i am not a very emotional person myself atleast i dont show it anyway.I have known more people that have died in my life than i cared to ever see happen,i never cry or get all sad and depressed when one dies i believe their energy is released and becomes part of everything else.My grandfather's death was the only one i ever took very hard did not know how to accept it,and when i get that way i only have 2 emotions angry and drunk lol.That turns out to be good for no one!

"If it is not advantageous,do not move.If objectives can not be attained,do not employ the army.Unless endangered do not engage in warfare.The ruler cannot mobilize the army out of personal anger.The general can not engage in battle because of personal frustration.When it is advantageous,move;when not advantageous,stop.Anger can revert to happiness,annoyance can revert to joy,but a vanquished state cannot be revived,the dead cannot be brought back to life." Sun-Tzu

#26    Jinxdom

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:37 AM

View Postlittle_dreamer, on 11 February 2013 - 03:18 AM, said:

The older you get, the more encounters with death that you experience.  

That is one thing I wish was true for me. Maybe I'm lucky i didn't though, since I was quite aware of my own mortality from an early age.

Don't know how bad losing a kid is, but the first person you ever loved being killed in a very bad way sucked worse then any other death I've come in to contact with. Which is the only death, that I can still get upset about if I linger on it.

I like what you said about the cemetery thing though, my friends thought I was weird because I would walk around them and instead of being creeped out like most people I've run across, I see it as one of those most peaceful places you could ever walk through(yet with the uncanny urge to sing songs which hopefully they don't mind all too much more soulful songs though)





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