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Robin Hood-did he exist?


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#1    ali smack

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 05:13 PM

was he made up or real


#2    AsteroidX

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 05:21 PM

He was real but the story is muttled with fantasy. Up to you though what you want to believe.


http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Robin_Hood


#3    ealdwita

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 07:07 PM

Who are we to argue with the infallible Saint Wiki, Patron Saint of Make-It-Up-As-You-Go-Along?

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#4    Nathan DiYorio

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:48 AM

View Postealdwita, on 08 February 2013 - 07:07 PM, said:

Who are we to argue with the infallible Saint Wiki, Patron Saint of Make-It-Up-As-You-Go-Along?

Yeah, who are you?

Posted Image


#5    Antilles

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 07:52 AM

Well, he certainly wasn't Errol Flynn.

I think Robin is an amalgam of historical figures and Celtic myth.


#6    schizoidwoman

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:08 AM

As a native of Nottinghamshire, I am bound to say that he was 100% real!


#7    Frank Merton

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:44 AM

Few nowadays know the original story; we need a good modern movie that stays with the original story instead of thinking they can improve it by making it realistic.  The romance and politics are corny and the characters are overdrawn -- that's the way movies should be.


#8    Bonecrusher

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 02:13 PM

It dosn't matter if it's true or false..

It's a fable that ends up a good morality tale for our times.

However it's one of the first signs of communism I've seen.

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#9    ealdwita

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 03:26 PM

For what it's worth.....

The oldest ballad involving Robin Hood was “Robin Hood and the Monk”. Academics date the ballad to either the thirteenth or fourteenth centuries; even a layman can easily recognize a close resemblance of the language used in the ballad to that of Chaucer’s day. And that raises a very interesting point about the possible origins of the Robin Hood legend: in Chaucer’s day, it was common for authors to write about people they knew in person and simply give the characters different names. (For instance, Chaucer himself used this tactic when writing his “The Book of the Duchess”, an homage to the late Blanch of Lancaster.)

While Robin Hood was later portrayed as a noble (some even called him the Earl of Huntingdon), another early ballad, “The Gest of Robyn Hode”, plainly opens with the following lines: “Lythe and listin, gentilmen, that be of frebore blode; I shall you tel of a gode yeman, his name was Robyn Hode.” Historically, a yeoman has always ranked below the nobility, even though he was a free landowner. If Robin Hood had been a noble, it would have been rather an insult to describe him as a man of lesser rank than he actually bore.

Contemporary Viewpoints of Robin Hood
The early ballads show that he was the more prominent of his merry men, who were also yeomen (they seem to divert to his leadership). And while later legends give him many companions, including Maid Marian, the early tales portray Much the Miller’s son, Little John, and Will Scarlet as his primary comrades.
One aspect of Robin Hood that has remained the same over time was his political stance: he was very against corruption – especially in the nobility and the clergy – and championed the rights of the poor. It was no wonder Robin Hood was so popular during the Middle Ages; he was literally the voice of the oppressed, hungry, and disgruntled masses. From stories such as “Piers Plowman”, it is clear that Robin Hood had already saturated pop culture by the mid-1300’s, even becoming a fixture at traditional May Day games.

Another thing that made Robin Hood so attractive to the fourteenth century mind was his notion of chivalry. Even though Maid Marian was a later addition, “The Gest of Robyn Hode” has something to say about his chivalrous nature: “Robyn loued Our der Lady; For dout of dydly synne, Wolde he neuer do campani harme that any woman was in”. At that time, courtly love was rampant; women were placed on pedestals, and the most masculine thing a man could do would be to protect their honor and sing of their virtues.
The Real Robin Hood
In all likelihood, Robin Hood was based on the exploits of a real man whose name has since been lost to history. Today, Robin Hood is synonymous with notoriety and his virtues are well-remembered. Even if time forgot the man behind the name, his message still lives on.

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"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#10    Taun

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:28 PM

ealdwita ic þancie þe for þes andgiet ..

(that took awhile to look up - and it's probably not correct...)  :unsure2:

Edited by Taun, 12 February 2013 - 05:29 PM.


#11    ealdwita

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 06:06 PM

Gea, lùcan genòg, frèond

To save looking it up......"Yes, close enough, friend)

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#12    Abramelin

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:34 PM

View Postealdwita, on 08 February 2013 - 07:07 PM, said:

Who are we to argue with the infallible Saint Wiki, Patron Saint of Make-It-Up-As-You-Go-Along?

Maybe you can argue with this (from the same Wiki):

Bibliography
  • Baldwin, David (2010). Robin Hood: The English Outlaw Unmasked. Amberley Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84868-378-5.
  • Barry, Edward (1832). Sur les vicissitudes et les transformations du cycle populaire de Robin Hood. Rignoux.
  • Blamires, David (1998). Robin Hood: A Hero for All Times. J. Rylands Univ. Lib. of Manchester. ISBN 0-86373-136-8.
  • Child, Francis James (1997). The English and Scottish Popular Ballads. 1–5. Dover Publications. ISBN 978-0-486-43150-5.
  • Coghlan, Ronan (2003). The Robin Hood Companion. Xiphos Books. ISBN 0-9544936-0-5.
  • Deitweiler, Laurie, Coleman, Diane (2004). Robin Hood Comprehension Guide. Veritas Pr Inc. ISBN 1-930710-77-1.
  • Dixon-Kennedy, Mike (2006). The Robin Hood Handbook. Sutton Publishing. ISBN 0-7509-3977-X.
  • Dobson, R. B.; Taylor, John (1977). The Rymes of Robin Hood: An Introduction to the English Outlaw. Sutton Publishing. ISBN 0-7509-1661-3.
  • Doel, Fran, Doel, Geoff (2000). Robin Hood: Outlaw and Greenwood Myth. Tempus Publishing Ltd. ISBN 0-7524-1479-8.
  • Green, Barbara (2001). Secrets of the Grave. Palmyra Press. ISBN 0-9540164-0-8.
  • Hahn, Thomas (2000). Robin Hood in Popular Culture: Violence, Transgression and Justice. D.S. Brewer. ISBN 0-85991-564-6.
  • Harris, P. V. (1978). Truth About Robin Hood. Linney. ISBN 0-900525-16-9.
  • Hilton, R.H., The Origins of Robin Hood, Past and Present, No. 14. (Nov., 1958), pp. 30–44. Available online at JSTOR.
  • Holt, J. C. (1982). Robin Hood. Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  • Holt, J.C. (1989). "Robin Hood," Perspectives on culture and society, vol. 2, 127-144
  • Hutton, Ronald (1997). The Stations of the Sun: A History of the Ritual Year in Britain. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-288045-4.
  • Hutton, Ronald (1996). The Rise and Fall of Merry England: The Ritual Year 1400–1700. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-285327-9.
  • Knight, Stephen Thomas (1994). Robin Hood: A Complete Study of the English Outlaw. Blackwell Publishers. ISBN 0-631-19486-X.
  • Knight, Stephen Thomas (2003). Robin Hood: A Mythic Biography. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-3885-3.
  • Phillips, Helen (2005). Robin Hood: Medieval and Post-medieval. Four Courts Press. ISBN 1-85182-931-8.
  • Pollard, A. J. (2004). Imagining Robin Hood: The Late Medieval Stories in Historical Context. Routledge, an imprint of Taylor & Francis Books Ltd. ISBN 0-415-22308-3.
  • Potter, Lewis (1998). Playing Robin Hood: The Legend as Performance in Five Centuries. University of Delaware Press. ISBN 0-87413-663-6.
  • Pringle, Patrick (1991). Stand and Deliver: Highway Men from Robin Hood to Dick Turpin. Dorset Press. ISBN 0-88029-698-4.
  • Ritson, Joseph (1832). Robin Hood: A Collection of All the Ancient Poems, Songs, and Ballads, Now Extant Relative to That Celebrated English Outlaw: To Which are Prefixed Historical Anecdotes of His Life. William Pickering. ISBN 1-4212-6209-6.
  • Rutherford-Moore, Richard (1999). The Legend of Robin Hood. Capall Bann Publishing. ISBN 1-86163-069-7.
  • Rutherford-Moore, Richard (2002). Robin Hood: On the Outlaw Trail. Capall Bann Publishing. ISBN 1-86163-177-4.
  • Vahimagi, Tise (1994). British Television: An Illustrated Guide. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-818336-4.
  • Wright, Thomas (1847). Songs and Carols, now first imprinted. Percy Society.
External links

Posted Image Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Robin Hood


#13    Eldorado

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:37 PM

Now that we've (probably) established that he (probably) did indeed exist, I can't help but wonder...  did he really wear tights and a rather effeminate looking wee hat?


#14    rashore

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 03:04 PM

View PostEldorado, on 13 February 2013 - 01:37 PM, said:

Now that we've (probably) established that he (probably) did indeed exist, I can't help but wonder...  did he really wear tights and a rather effeminate looking wee hat?

I'm going to hazard a guess and say no to the tights. Though such a fashion did come up in the courts to wear single piece tights with short tunics at early as the 1350's, it was not the fashion for the regular folks. If Robin was a yeoman, it's terribly unlikely he would have worn short tunic with single piece tights. It would be likely he would have worn single legged hose with breeches with shirt, doublet, tunic of longer lengths over them.
And no, no cute little Robin Hood hat. Though there is strong argument for it being a form of roman pilaeus, there really isn't evidence of such hats at the time. Much more popular at the time was the chaperon, sort of a hood/cape/hat thing.


#15    Frank Merton

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 03:16 PM

I picked up one item of interest -- the name "Robin Hood" was probably made up, even if it was modeled after a real person.

The version I have of it (not too clear) is that he was a Saxon fighting for Saxon rights against the new French nobility, personified by Henry.  Also he was a supporter of Richard, who was also a Saxon, so that doesn't quite total four.





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