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Monkey seen helping another monkey give birth

black snub-nosed monkeys birth midwives

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#1    Still Waters

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 10:33 PM

Humans aren't built for giving birth. Babies' heads are big to accommodate their big brains, but the mother's hips are small because they walk upright. As a result, birth takes hours and is extremely painful – and midwives almost always help out.

Other animals may find birth difficult, particularly if the babies have been gestating for a long time and have grown large. Nevertheless, most mammals have it easier than humans. Monkeys give birth in less than ten minutes.

So it is a surprise that female black snub-nosed monkeys may be assisted by "midwives" when they give birth. This behaviour has only been seen once in this species, but it suggests that it's not just human mothers that need help giving birth.

http://www.newscient...ivers-baby.html

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#2    Professor T

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 12:11 AM

cool.
not sure why but I liked this artical..
Perhaps because it show's that humanity is not alone in showing societal compassion..

Quote

A female monkey gave birth to her first infant within fifteen minutes late one morning. While sitting in a rhododendron tree, she began twisting her body and calling faintly. After 10 minutes she started screaming, and then another female climbed up the tree. She was an experienced mother, and sat beside the labouring female while the crown of the infant's head appeared. Once the head was fully exposed, the "midwife" pulled the baby out with both hands and ripped open the birth membranes.
Within a minute, the mother had reclaimed the infant from the midwife, severed the umbilical cord, and begun eating the placenta. A few minutes later, the midwife went back down to the forest floor to forage.



#3    redhen

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 06:18 AM

View PostProfessor T, on 12 February 2013 - 12:11 AM, said:

cool.
not sure why but I liked this artical..
Perhaps because it show's that humanity is not alone in showing societal compassion..

Not only are we not alone, I think this shows how our empathy evolved.


#4    Professor T

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 07:18 AM

View Postredhen, on 12 February 2013 - 06:18 AM, said:

Not only are we not alone, I think this shows how our empathy evolved.

cool.. I think you are right... :)

But I think it's a little more than empathy when you have young "mothers to be" being gathered around to view and learn the process.. That to me anyway, denotes a want or need for learning at a society level..

There are other mysteries about this that make you go hmmmmmmmmmm.....
Such as why do this breed only give birth at night making this such a rare occurace.. (this kind of denotes a societial programming around the sacred-ity of childbirth)

Society/civilisation, these are things that are often seen as human traits............................... I have to admit it is awe inspiring to see that is not just something that humans can do..

I don't think society and Civilisation are things born of instinct..

Edited by Professor T, 12 February 2013 - 07:35 AM.


#5    schizoidwoman

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:09 AM

An absolutely fascinating article, thanks for sharing it!


#6    ash68

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 03:17 PM

No surprise for me as we're almost monkey and they're almost human.


#7    coolguy

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 03:06 AM

Awesome story monkeys and apes are really smart.


#8    mfrmboy

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:17 PM

Great article !
Woo woo Hee Hee Push.......


#9    Starseed hybrid 1111

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:08 PM

dude this this monkey is amazing and Awsome!!!that news right there!!!this is the kind of stuff they should talk about in the news!!!anyway i always found that animals are more human than real humans and nature never ceases to amaze me and will not stop:)that monkey should get a price and special treatment as in whatever those monkeys eat and etc!!! LOL





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