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EU and US free-trade talks launched


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#1    Render

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 10:41 AM

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The European Union and the US will begin formal talks on a free-trade agreement, paving the way for the biggest trade deal in history.
European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso made the announcement following President Barack Obama's State of the Union address.
The US said that "everything is on the table" in the talks.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-21439945


And the UK wants out ... rrrrrrrrrrright...


#2    Mr Right Wing

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 11:33 AM

View PostRender, on 14 February 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-21439945


And the UK wants out ... rrrrrrrrrrright...

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#3    stevewinn

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:49 AM

View PostRender, on 14 February 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-21439945


And the UK wants out ... rrrrrrrrrrright...

Jose Barrosso is getting a head of himself. - believe me when i say. not much will change from what we see today. Obama is gone in 4 years. these trade deals will take almost that long to set up. America and American business is very protective, look at the mood in the US now against trade, 'cheap' trade with China. but such a deal would benefit the UK, because the current trade barriers imposed on US by the EU between UK / US trade would be gone or decreased so that would benefit us. but this is my point exactly. if the UK wasn't a EU member we would have already had the benefits this proposed EU deal would bring. so we could have had this deal on our own years, no, decades ago if we wasn't EU members. see what i mean. the UK, could have had the best of both, as a NON-EU member we'd have remained trading with the EU, and set up our own trade deals with the us. (without interference from EU enforced tariffs) so yet again we accept second best, So render, what seems like good news on the surface in reality its just another one of them missed opportunities for UK.plc. and a perfect example of what the UK should have done decades ago. IE: been able to set up its own trade deals/tariffs with the world. instead we were forbidden by the EU.

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#4    Br Cornelius

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:57 AM

View Poststevewinn, on 15 February 2013 - 11:49 AM, said:

Jose Barrosso is getting a head of himself. - believe me when i say. not much will change from what we see today. Obama is gone in 4 years. these trade deals will take almost that long to set up. America and American business is very protective, look at the mood in the US now against trade, 'cheap' trade with China. but such a deal would benefit the UK, because the current trade barriers imposed on US by the EU between UK / US trade would be gone or decreased so that would benefit us. but this is my point exactly. if the UK wasn't a EU member we would have already had the benefits this proposed EU deal would bring. so we could have had this deal on our own years, no, decades ago if we wasn't EU members. see what i mean. the UK, could have had the best of both, as a NON-EU member we'd have remained trading with the EU, and set up our own trade deals with the us. (without interference from EU enforced tariffs) so yet again we accept second best, So render, what seems like good news on the surface in reality its just another one of them missed opportunities for UK.plc. and a perfect example of what the UK should have done decades ago. IE: been able to set up its own trade deals/tariffs with the world. instead we were forbidden by the EU.
That is a big assumption on your part with no evidence to support it. A large trading block will rarely offer advantage to a small trading block over its own domestic industry. The UK is just another small trading nation to the USA and their main interest comes because of a low corportate tax regime and the ability it offers American Multinationals to trade into the EU at preferantial rates. Out of the EU and countries like Ireland and an independent Scotland inside the EU would look far more inviting prospects.

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#5    Mr Right Wing

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:02 PM

View PostRender, on 14 February 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-21439945

And the UK wants out ... rrrrrrrrrrright...

Now hang on.

If the whole of European civilization (US, Canada, Britain, Europe, Austrailia and New Zealand) want to unite into one nation I might actually agree with that. Thats even though I'm euroskeptic.


#6    questionmark

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 02:09 PM

Before all jump up and down in joy: There are many obstacles to overcome on this one, GM Foods, hazardous chemicals, legal practices... so don't expect this to happen over night. But one thing is certain: If the US does not change course rather quickly (and I don't see any sign that it will) it will need the European industry to face up to the Chinese in lieu of its own.

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#7    Mr Right Wing

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 02:57 PM

View Postquestionmark, on 15 February 2013 - 02:09 PM, said:

Before all jump up and down in joy: There are many obstacles to overcome on this one, GM Foods, hazardous chemicals, legal practices... so don't expect this to happen over night. But one thing is certain: If the US does not change course rather quickly (and I don't see any sign that it will) it will need the European industry to face up to the Chinese in lieu of its own.

If all our countries unite that would be a GDP of $30 trillion, a population that rivals Indias or Chinas but militarily we'd be unstoppable.


#8    AsteroidX

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 03:22 PM

You Euros arent going to like what we propose err shove down your gullets. And no offense you can keep your beef. Im sticking with good ole USDA Angus Beef.


#9    questionmark

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 04:37 PM

View PostAsteroidX, on 15 February 2013 - 03:22 PM, said:

You Euros arent going to like what we propose err shove down your gullets. And no offense you can keep your beef. Im sticking with good ole USDA Angus Beef.

I am afraid that they will do the shoving, we need them more than they us.

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#10    AsteroidX

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 04:47 PM

If they need us more then we need them then were both in a world of hurt. We aint got nothin but military and guns for sale..and a bit of fracked oil and coal.

Twinkies....nope

Edited by AsteroidX, 15 February 2013 - 04:47 PM.


#11    stevewinn

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 02:00 PM

View PostBr Cornelius, on 15 February 2013 - 11:57 AM, said:

That is a big assumption on your part with no evidence to support it. A large trading block will rarely offer advantage to a small trading block over its own domestic industry. The UK is just another small trading nation to the USA and their main interest comes because of a low corportate tax regime and the ability it offers American Multinationals to trade into the EU at preferantial rates. Out of the EU and countries like Ireland and an independent Scotland inside the EU would look far more inviting prospects.

Br Cornelius

its not a big assumption at all, the USA as been our biggest exporter for the last 78 years. why wouldn't the USA want to have mutual trade benefits with its closest ally, and the worlds fifth largest economy. - just look at USA trade deals in the far east with countries smaller than the UK. - as for corporation rates the UK as some the lowest rates in the developed world at just 20%. but lets move on to and make a massive assumption. that the US/EU trade deal comes off. it makes the UK's leaving the EU case even better. we'd remain free trade members of the EU and yet operate outside the EU, but still have the best of both worlds. and in the process the EU would have made trading with our largest exporter even more beneficial (UK/USA) which then leaves us to strike deals with who we want, - when we want. on our own terms. :clap: seeing how the UK trades more with the world than the EU. this would make us stronger in leaving. we'd be free of EU tariffs from imports/exports outside the EU. and the first trade deal we should rekindle, with an attached apology would go to our cousins in the land down under, Australia/New Zealand, for us turning our back on them when we joined the EU in 1975. - we should join something like NAFTA, need a little name change from North America to North Atlantic Free Trade. and then like i've said strike beneficial trade deals with Australia/New Zealand, India. that way we'd have our fingers in every pie. it might be worth reminding ourselves europe is stagnating, the EU model is flawed, outdated, and unworkable.

i remember how Questionmark, Br, and Keith would praise to high heaven the EU in its goal to challenge and overtake the USA, and laugh how indebted the USA is to China. - yet today some hold up like a beacon of light a possible trade deal between the 'bad' USA and the EU - and as for the USA indebtedness to China. who have the EU went cap in hand to, yes you guessed it the Chinese. The EU begging China to buy EU debt. how times have changed. :tsu:

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#12    Frank Merton

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 02:07 PM

Britain and the United States are natural allies and trading partners and have been since the 1850s.  Ireland was the only fly and that has now been resolved pretty much.

I was surprised when the British decided to throw their oar in with Europe rather than the States, but I guess they had little choice as the States weren't ready for any such thinking.  Now it seems rather obvious that Europe and North America need to get together to be able to hold their own in economies of scale.

I worry about the smaller countries around the world.  In particular I worry about SE Asia, which would be forced into a situation of hegemony under China if the Americans and Europeans turn selfish and exclusive.  In the end this world work against both American and European interests.  The point I make is that the particular interests of the participants cannot be allowed to dominate to the harm of countries not part of the negotiation.  Otherwise any such agreement will ultimately fail in competition with the rest of the world.


#13    Render

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 02:09 PM

EU 'growth boost from US free-trade deal'

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Europe's most senior trade official has said that a free-trade agreement between the US and European Union would boost its growth by as much as 1%, leading to many more jobs.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-21647540





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