Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Asteroid targeting system proposed


  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#16    The Sky Scanner

The Sky Scanner

    Observer

  • Member
  • 5,179 posts
  • Joined:30 Jun 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK

  • The loud ones never last!

Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:27 PM

View Postfreetoroam, on 17 February 2013 - 09:21 PM, said:


A meteorite is simply an object that has entered another bodies atmosphere (in this case planet Earth) and survived travelling through the atmosphere to impact the ground. An asteroid never impacts another bodies atmosphere, and has no atmosphere itself. An asteroid can range in size from small to very large, and even have their own moon/s.

Edit - to simplify the difference, they are both basically the same thing, both originating from space, they are separated only by location, an asteroid stays in space, a meteorite is what hits the ground.

Edited by Sky Scanner, 17 February 2013 - 09:31 PM.

"Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science". ~ Edwin Powell Hubble

#17    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 14,738 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:35 PM

View Postwilliam joseph, on 16 February 2013 - 07:42 PM, said:

Hasn't this idea been around for years? Aim a laser of some kind and the vaporized materials push the asteroid out of the critical path.

What scares me is the 1.4 Megatons of energy being tossed around. Whoever controls this De-Star4 thing could just as easily turn it on the Earth and fry cities with zero chance of defence.

Myself, I favor sending an ion drive robot satellite to individual asteroids and using those to push the asteroids away.

View Postshrooma, on 17 February 2013 - 12:55 PM, said:

strange, how the meteorite went from being 'a couple of metres' across, to 50ft across. in my book, a couple of metres is six feet, not fifty!
who did the maths on this thing, forrest gump??
a 50ft meteorite would've done more than break a few windows I reckon, and I wonder what kind of TARDIS effect allowed a 50ft object to fit inside a 16ft crater.....?
It likely created a smaller hole because... most of it vaporized 15 miles up.

It also blew out just windows because.... most of it vaporized 15 miles up. 15 miles......

So.... You want every report to be the same, starting immediately after the event and not being changed later to reflect incoming data? No one had any idea how big it was at first, but after people analyzed the energy output and area affected and reviewed how high it was and at what angle it came in at.... All that leads to a better guess on the size... 50 feet in diameter.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#18    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 14,738 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:46 PM

View PostSky Scanner, on 17 February 2013 - 09:27 PM, said:

A meteorite is simply an object that has entered another bodies atmosphere (in this case planet Earth) and survived travelling through the atmosphere to impact the ground. An asteroid never impacts another bodies atmosphere, and has no atmosphere itself. An asteroid can range in size from small to very large, and even have their own moon/s.

Edit - to simplify the difference, they are both basically the same thing, both originating from space, they are separated only by location, an asteroid stays in space, a meteorite is what hits the ground.
I thought the difference between an asteroid and a meteoroid is only size. They can be made of the same materials and both can impact other bodies in space. From what I've read, generally an asteroid has to be larger then 10 meters in diameter. Smaller then that and it is a meteoroid. It is a meteor when it hits the atmosphere, and a meteorite if it reaches the ground.

Quote

In 1961, the International Astronomical Union defined a meteoroid as "a solid object moving in interplanetary space, of a size considerably smaller than an asteroid and considerably larger than an atom". In 1995, Beech and Steel, writing in Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, proposed a new definition where a meteoroid would be between 100 µm and 10 meters across. Following the discovery of asteroids below 10 m in size, Rubin and Grossman refined the Beech and Steel definition of meteoroid to objects between 10 µm and 1 m in diameter. The smallest asteroid (based on absolute magnitude) is 2008 TS26 with an absolute magnitude of 33.2, and an estimated size of 1-meter. Objects smaller than meteoroids are classified as micrometeoroids and cosmic dust. The Minor Planet Center does not use the term "meteoroid".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteoroid
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteroid

So, going off Wiki, this 50 foot, 15 meter, rock could be considered a mereoroid, or an  asteroid. Or, perhaps even both.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#19    The Sky Scanner

The Sky Scanner

    Observer

  • Member
  • 5,179 posts
  • Joined:30 Jun 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK

  • The loud ones never last!

Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:51 PM

View PostDieChecker, on 17 February 2013 - 09:46 PM, said:

I thought the difference between an asteroid and a meteoroid is only size. They can be made of the same materials and both can impact other bodies in space. From what I've read, generally an asteroid has to be larger then 10 meters in diameter. Smaller then that and it is a meteoroid. It is a meteor when it hits the atmosphere, and a meteorite if it reaches the ground.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteoroid
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteroid

So, going off Wiki, this 50 foot, 15 meter, rock could be considered a mereoroid, or an  asteroid. Or, perhaps even both.

Well yes and no, really, lol. Size becomes less relevant when compared to composition, yet they are both more or less the same material too....it depends how indepth you want to get about it really, hence just giving a simplified version. This explains it pretty well:

http://www.universet...and-meteorites/

"Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science". ~ Edwin Powell Hubble

#20    freetoroam

freetoroam

    Honourary member of the UM asylum

  • Member
  • 5,685 posts
  • Joined:11 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:rivers and canals of England and Wales.

Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:54 PM

View PostSky Scanner, on 17 February 2013 - 09:27 PM, said:

A meteorite is simply an object that has entered another bodies atmosphere (in this case planet Earth) and survived travelling through the atmosphere to impact the ground. An asteroid never impacts another bodies atmosphere, and has no atmosphere itself. An asteroid can range in size from small to very large, and even have their own moon/s.

Edit - to simplify the difference, they are both basically the same thing, both originating from space, they are separated only by location, an asteroid stays in space, a meteorite is what hits the ground.
Getting this now. So the name changes when it enters Earths orbit. Like a foreigner is only a foreigner once they enter someone elses country.
So if the meteorite never hits the ground and stays in space, it is still an asteroid?

If a piece of rock broke off from an asteroid, is it still classed as an asteroid or is it now a piece of space rock until it hits earths orbit then it becomes a meteorite?

My initial "confusion" was that the meteorite came from an asteroid, i was asking where is that asteroid?  I can understand if it is too far out to even think about, but when the others hit in other parts of the Earth I just thought this too much of a coincidence if they were not related to each other.

Only one asteroid has been spotted and none of these meteorites which have hit Earth come from it....are you seeing my confusion?

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#21    freetoroam

freetoroam

    Honourary member of the UM asylum

  • Member
  • 5,685 posts
  • Joined:11 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:rivers and canals of England and Wales.

Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:58 PM

View PostDieChecker, on 17 February 2013 - 09:46 PM, said:

I thought the difference between an asteroid and a meteoroid is only size. They can be made of the same materials and both can impact other bodies in space. From what I've read, generally an asteroid has to be larger then 10 meters in diameter. Smaller then that and it is a meteoroid. It is a meteor when it hits the atmosphere, and a meteorite if it reaches the ground.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteoroid
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteroid

So, going off Wiki, this 50 foot, 15 meter, rock could be considered a mereoroid, or an  asteroid. Or, perhaps even both.


Edited by freetoroam, 17 February 2013 - 09:59 PM.

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#22    shrooma

shrooma

    Ugly bag of mostly water.

  • Member
  • 2,707 posts
  • Joined:14 Feb 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:leeds, UK.

  • Live.
    Sin.
    Die.

Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:06 PM

View Postfreetoroam, on 17 February 2013 - 09:21 PM, said:

when they hit our atmosphere, they're meteors, but when they hit the ground they're meteorites, and the one in russia left a 16ft hole in the ground, so it's DEFINITELY a meteorite!
:-)

''One is all for religion until one visits a really religious country. Then, one is all for drains, machinery, and a minimum wage.''
-Aldous Huxley-

#23    The Sky Scanner

The Sky Scanner

    Observer

  • Member
  • 5,179 posts
  • Joined:30 Jun 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK

  • The loud ones never last!

Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:09 PM

View Postfreetoroam, on 17 February 2013 - 09:54 PM, said:

Getting this now. So the name changes when it enters Earths orbit. Like a foreigner is only a foreigner once they enter someone elses country.
So if the meteorite never hits the ground and stays in space, it is still an asteroid?

If a piece of rock broke off from an asteroid, is it still classed as an asteroid or is it now a piece of space rock until it hits earths orbit then it becomes a meteorite?

My initial "confusion" was that the meteorite came from an asteroid, i was asking where is that asteroid?  I can understand if it is too far out to even think about, but when the others hit in other parts of the Earth I just thought this too much of a coincidence if they were not related to each other.

Only one asteroid has been spotted and none of these meteorites which have hit Earth come from it....are you seeing my confusion?

It's not the case that it just has to enter earths atmosphere, on it's travel through the atmosphere it is a meteoroid, and not all meteoroids hit the ground, some skim the atmosphere and shoot off into space again, it's only when it hits the ground that it's a meteorite.

So if a piece of asteroid breaks off in space, it's still an asteroid, unless it enters the atmosphere of another body, then it changes again.

"Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science". ~ Edwin Powell Hubble

#24    freetoroam

freetoroam

    Honourary member of the UM asylum

  • Member
  • 5,685 posts
  • Joined:11 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:rivers and canals of England and Wales.

Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:14 PM

"Do you mean asteroid. An object is only a meteorite if it has actually hit the ground."

Thankyou Sky scanner, I understand it now. its the above bit from another thread which originally confused me.

Either way, it still stands that they are not all detectable...at this moment in time.

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#25    equus hemionus

equus hemionus

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 21 posts
  • Joined:01 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:usa

  • believe anything or not

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:59 AM

I suspect our arrogance will doom us before any phisical threat of nature. We seem to keep "all eggs in one basket" rather than putting more effort into survival of our speices. Nature seems to roll dice.


#26    highdesert50

highdesert50

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  • Joined:09 Jul 2010
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:15 AM

Like all sentient beings we wish to live comfortably in as little pain as possible with the understanding that we will not live forever. The looming issue is whether we as a civilization expect to perpetuate. If so, then we certainly need to focus altruistically on a plan to promote the survival of our civilization whether it be from falling debris or other peril. That is an evolutionary step forward. Can we frame our individual lives as selfless rather than selfish entities?


#27    MedicTJ

MedicTJ

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,065 posts
  • Joined:09 Jan 2003
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NW Indiana

Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:46 AM

View Postfreetoroam, on 17 February 2013 - 06:48 PM, said:

i really would much rather someone spend the money on getting rid of the nuclear weapons which are popping up all over the joint.
Thats where the real danger lies.

Funny really, they were all watching the DA14 and on the other side of the world we were getting bombarded with "small rocks" no one knew they were coming or where they came from.


ps: my school where one them bestest in Sauf London.  Posted Image

(in regards to bold print) That almost sounds like a message, doesn't it?  The translation would be, "Yes, good job on tracking near-earth-objects.  But guess what?  I can hit you whenever I want to hit you and you can't do anything to stop it."

I am convinced that there's no coincidence here.  If there were, the Russian object would have been a piece of DA14.  But we were made VERY aware that that wasn't even a remote possibility.

Dr. Phil says that marriage is hard work.

I say....if marriage is hard work, you're doing it wrong.  Love is not work.  Love is eternal.

http://www.reverbnat...om/tjflickinger

#28    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 14,738 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 18 February 2013 - 03:52 AM

Rocks like the one that blew up over Russia could be tracked... But to what point?? They clearly are not going to do much more then damage a building or two. No one was reported killed that I know of. I'd much rather the scientists keep looking for the "game ending", Boss Monster asteroids, and let the little ones just take care of themselves.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#29    WoIverine

WoIverine

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 6,682 posts
  • Joined:16 Sep 2008
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:25 PM

There isn't a shark that's big enough...


#30    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 10,383 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • I dunno --

Posted 18 February 2013 - 03:28 PM

This idea of people turning meteors into weapons seems ironic -- back to the age when we throw rocks at each other.

I have no doubt that an early-warning system for stray rocks heading our way will happen.  The technology is there just begging to be used.  Risk management involves multiplying the chance of an occurrence times the severity.  In this case the chance is small but the consequence (things on the order of the obliteration of a city or worse) severe enough that the equations show the need.  (We already have such a system for planet-obliterating type objects -- it doesn't seem any present any near danger).





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users