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My son can't go to state school...


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#1    MoorWalks

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 11:29 AM


A  Conservative candidate aiming to snatch Chris Huhne's former seat back from the Lib-Dems has been accused of snobbery after suggesting state schools were not good enough for her son.

Maria Hutchings, the Tory candidate in the Eastleigh by-election, has been hit by a storm of criticism after she seemed to suggest her 12-year-old son, who has ambitions to become a surgeon, was too clever for state schools.


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Edited by xsas, 17 February 2013 - 11:29 AM.

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#2    stevewinn

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 12:00 PM

View Postxsas, on 17 February 2013 - 11:29 AM, said:


A  Conservative candidate aiming to snatch Chris Huhne's former seat back from the Lib-Dems has been accused of snobbery after suggesting state schools were not good enough for her son.

Maria Hutchings, the Tory candidate in the Eastleigh by-election, has been hit by a storm of criticism after she seemed to suggest her 12-year-old son, who has ambitions to become a surgeon, was too clever for state schools.


Read More Here



she is most probably right. i think if people were honest and could afford the fees for a private school they'd send their children there. - some state schools have excellent results and produce out standing students. but the truth is if you want to become a surgeon, rocket scientist etc...real real top stuff. then a state school is going to limit your chances.

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#3    Queen in the North

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 03:32 PM

I went to a pretty rubbish state school and I achieved the entry grades to study medicine (though I'm not). I do think you get out what you put in.

Also, he's 12. He probably won't be a cardio-respiratory surgeon. Sounds like the posh equivalent of when kids say they want to be a doctor. He'll probably change his mind half a dozen times before he actually has to make a serious decision on his future - if his mother gives him the chance to decide for himself.

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#4    and then

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:05 PM

Similar people abound in the US.   Scores on the standardized tests, ACT or SAT generally are used to determine who goes on to obtain higher education and this levels the playing field, but one's history is considered as well when applying for the top flight schools.  Bottom line is that a gifted student in an inner city public school would have to strive harder for the opportunities that students of better quality schools receive as a matter of course.

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#5    Orcseeker

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:08 PM

Here in Australia, private schools spoon feed the students so regardless of intelligence, all you need is enough effort to chew the food and you can get a good score. In state schools you just need to work harder. Too smart for state school? What a laugh.

We get kids wanting to be surgeons and stuff over here dropping out of their course because they are so used to being spoon fed and hand held that they can't cope/didn't have the intelligence anyway. A sad state of affairs indeed and enabling the divide between the classes. Also restricting real talent. Our university course determining system is a joke too.

It's almost skewered towards those born into opportunity. If your class does well it affects your score positively, much like if your school does. So if you are a smart kid in a trodden down suburb with low grades you are put to a disadvantage by quite a lot. It's a terribly flawed system and needs a complete rehash.


#6    TheLastLazyGun

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:40 PM

If his son wants to be a surgeon then his father would be well-advised to send him to private school.  You need a good education to be a surgeon.  State education in Britain is slipping in standards and children who are taught at British state schools are slipping down the world league table for educational achievements in things like maths and science - although we were near the top of the list in 1997 after 18 years of Conservative rule.  After 13 years of Labour standards have slipped.

British private schools, though, offer the best education in the world and if your children want to be surgeons, rocket scientists or physicists then these are the schools you should be sending them.

Edited by TheLastLazyGun, 20 February 2013 - 05:44 PM.


#7    AsteroidX

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:54 PM

Quote

State education in Britain is slipping in standards and children who are taught at British state schools are slipping down the world league table for educational achievements in things like maths and science

Thats very odd we started hearing the same thing about American schools back about 15 years ago.


#8    freetoroam

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:59 PM

I went to a state school and when i ask my science teacher if i could be a rocket scientist they answered : " whats that?" :su

Think we had a similar story with Dianne Abbot.

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#9    Mr Right Wing

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:56 PM

View Postxsas, on 17 February 2013 - 11:29 AM, said:



A  Conservative candidate aiming to snatch Chris Huhne's former seat back from the Lib-Dems has been accused of snobbery after suggesting state schools were not good enough for her son.

Maria Hutchings, the Tory candidate in the Eastleigh by-election, has been hit by a storm of criticism after she seemed to suggest her 12-year-old son, who has ambitions to become a surgeon, was too clever for state schools.


Read More Here


In the UK the age of the child determines the year they're in when it comes to state education not their ability.

That holds back the gifted ones.


#10    ExpandMyMind

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:40 PM

View PostMr Right Wing, on 21 February 2013 - 01:56 PM, said:


In the UK the age of the child determines the year they're in when it comes to state education not their ability.

That holds back the gifted ones.

It is possible, at least up here, for someone to be moved to the class above if their ability (or more likely parent) demands it.


#11    keithisco

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:03 PM

View PostTheLastLazyGun, on 20 February 2013 - 05:40 PM, said:

If his son wants to be a surgeon then his father would be well-advised to send him to private school.  You need a good education to be a surgeon.  State education in Britain is slipping in standards and children who are taught at British state schools are slipping down the world league table for educational achievements in things like maths and science - although we were near the top of the list in 1997 after 18 years of Conservative rule.  After 13 years of Labour standards have slipped.

British private schools, though, offer the best education in the world and if your children want to be surgeons, rocket scientists or physicists then these are the schools you should be sending them.

Utter nonsense!! Unless you can prove otherwise...

My daughter goes to a Private (UK Curriculum) School in Spain, achieved A* in English and Spanish, C in English Lit (hated it but passed) in the IGCSE's 2 YEARS early (along with her classmates, and remember this was when there was a huge uproar because illiterate UK Kids cried because they didnt even get a C in their exams because of tougher marking criteria), is taking Maths, Biology, Chemistry, Economics and Art 1 YEAR early in May. Show me ANY UK Public School that can match that!!.. all for a quarter of the cost of sending her to Stroud or Cheltenham.


#12    itsnotoutthere

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:58 PM

Can't really criticize her, at least shes honest unlike Diane Abbott who's supposed (Champagne) socialist principles means that she decries private education as 'elitist' but sends her son to a private school anyway.

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#13    Mr Right Wing

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 11:11 PM

View Postkeithisco, on 21 February 2013 - 07:03 PM, said:

Utter nonsense!! Unless you can prove otherwise...

My daughter goes to a Private (UK Curriculum) School in Spain, achieved A* in English and Spanish, C in English Lit (hated it but passed) in the IGCSE's 2 YEARS early (along with her classmates, and remember this was when there was a huge uproar because illiterate UK Kids cried because they didnt even get a C in their exams because of tougher marking criteria), is taking Maths, Biology, Chemistry, Economics and Art 1 YEAR early in May. Show me ANY UK Public School that can match that!!.. all for a quarter of the cost of sending her to Stroud or Cheltenham.

I second this. I barely know of anyone who went through state education and came out with a degree. It just doesnt happen.


#14    rashore

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 11:30 PM

View Postkeithisco, on 21 February 2013 - 07:03 PM, said:

Utter nonsense!! Unless you can prove otherwise...

My daughter goes to a Private (UK Curriculum) School in Spain, achieved A* in English and Spanish, C in English Lit (hated it but passed) in the IGCSE's 2 YEARS early (along with her classmates, and remember this was when there was a huge uproar because illiterate UK Kids cried because they didnt even get a C in their exams because of tougher marking criteria), is taking Maths, Biology, Chemistry, Economics and Art 1 YEAR early in May. Show me ANY UK Public School that can match that!!.. all for a quarter of the cost of sending her to Stroud or Cheltenham.

Um, just saying... Lazy said private education was better in what you based this quote off of. And that public schools are slipping. Why are you asking him to show you how UK public school can match Spanish private school in response to his saying private school is better?

Quote

If his son wants to be a surgeon then his father would be well-advised to send him to private school.  You need a good education to be a surgeon.  State education in Britain is slipping in standards and children who are taught at British state schools are slipping down the world league table for educational achievements in things like maths and science - although we were near the top of the list in 1997 after 18 years of Conservative rule.  After 13 years of Labour standards have slipped.

British private schools, though, offer the best education in the world and if your children want to be surgeons, rocket scientists or physicists then these are the schools you should be sending them.

I could understand your comment if you were saying Spanish private school it's better where your child is than Brit private schools. Disputing his claim that Brit private is the best in the world.
But why did you ask Lazy to prove public schools were better than private schools?

Edit: needed to fix a bit...

Edited by rashore, 21 February 2013 - 11:33 PM.


#15    Queen in the North

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 11:13 AM

I always get slightly confused by these terms... Private school - private fee paying school. Public school - state school? Or another term for private? I'm sure I've heard both.

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