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Manufacturing the Future of Space Exploration

space launch system orion nasa

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:48 PM

Manufacturing the Future of Space Exploration


www.nasa.gov said:

An ATK technician performs one last<br />
check on the avionics test article<br />
for solid rocket boosters in<br />
preparation for the second Flight<br />
Control Test of NASA's Space Launch<br />
System (SLS) at the ATK facility in<br />
Promontory, Utah.<br />
Credit: ATK  <br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/gallery/fct_test_1.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'>› Full image and caption</a>
An ATK technician performs one last
check on the avionics test article
for solid rocket boosters in
preparation for the second Flight
Control Test of NASA's Space Launch
System (SLS) at the ATK facility in
Promontory, Utah.
Credit: ATK  
› Full image and caption
In 2010, President Obama challenged NASA to send humans to an asteroid by 2025 and then on to Mars in the 2030s. To meet that challenge, NASA is building the Space Launch System (SLS) to launch humans in the agency's Orion capsule farther into the solar system than ever before.

But before the first launch of the largest rocket ever built happens in 2017, American companies are working to design, test and manufacture it.

ATK of Brigham City, Utah, is building five-segment solid rocket boosters that will help propel the 70-metric-ton version of the rocket off the planet. The Boeing Company of Huntsville, Ala., is building the SLS core stage that will house cryogenic fuel at the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where more than a hundred external tanks were built for the shuttle program. That fuel will be routed to RS-25 engines built by Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) of Canoga Park, Calif., which also served as the space shuttle's main engines during 135 missions.

PWR also is building the J-2X engine that will provide power to the SLS upper stage engine of an advanced version of the SLS rocket with a 130-metric-ton lift capability. And Aerojet of Sacramento, Calif., Dynetics Inc., of Huntsville, Ala., Northrop Grumman Corporation Aerospace Systems of Redondo Beach, Calif., and ATK are all working on advanced booster concepts and hardware that could be used on the advanced version of the rocket.

As we make progress on SLS, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., is working closely with the Orion Program at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

A burst of flame from a J-2X Powerpack<br />
test-firing lights up the sky on Dec. 5,<br />
2012 at NASA's Stennis Space Center in<br />
Mississippi.<br />
Credit: NASA/SSC<br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/j2x/ppt_dec5_1.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'>› Full image and caption</a>
A burst of flame from a J-2X Powerpack
test-firing lights up the sky on Dec. 5,
2012 at NASA's Stennis Space Center in
Mississippi.
Credit: NASA/SSC
› Full image and caption
To read more about the progress NASA is making on the SLS, visit here.

To learn more about President Obama’s plan to make America a magnet for jobs, visit here.












Engineers using a state-of-the-art<br />
vertical welding tool at the Marshall<br />
Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.,<br />
move a "pathfinder" version of the<br />
adapter design that will be used on test<br />
flights of the Orion spacecraft and NASA's<br />
Space Launch System.<br />
Credit: NASA/MSFC/Emmet Given<br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/gallery/pathfinder1.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'>› Full image and caption</a>
Engineers using a state-of-the-art
vertical welding tool at the Marshall
Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.,
move a "pathfinder" version of the
adapter design that will be used on test
flights of the Orion spacecraft and NASA's
Space Launch System.
Credit: NASA/MSFC/Emmet Given
› Full image and caption


















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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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