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Curiosity Eats Mars Rock Powder

mars curiosity mars science laboratory rover nasa

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 12:17 AM

Lab Instruments Inside Curiosity Eat Mars Rock Powder


www.nasa.gov said:

<br />
This image from the Mars Hand Lens<br />
The left Mast Camera (Mastcam) on<br />
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity took<br />
this image of Curiosity's sample-<br />
processing and delivery tool just<br />
after the tool delivered a portion<br />
of powdered rock into the rover's<br />
Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)<br />
instrument.<br />
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS   <br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16766.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'> Full image and caption</a>

This image from the Mars Hand Lens
The left Mast Camera (Mastcam) on
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity took
this image of Curiosity's sample-
processing and delivery tool just
after the tool delivered a portion
of powdered rock into the rover's
Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)
instrument.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS  
Full image and caption
PASADENA, Calif. - Two compact laboratories inside NASA's Mars rover Curiosity have ingested portions of the first sample of rock powder ever collected from the interior of a rock on Mars.

Curiosity science team members will use the laboratories to analyze the rock powder in the coming days and weeks.

The rover's Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments received portions of the sample on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 22 and 23, respectively, and began inspecting the powder.

"Data from the instruments have confirmed the deliveries," said Curiosity Mission Manager Jennifer Trosper of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

The powder comes from Curiosity drilling into rock target "John Klein" on Feb. 8. One or more additional portions from the same initial sample may be delivered to the instruments as analysis proceeds.

During a two-year prime mission, researchers are using Curiosity's 10 science instruments to assess whether the study area in Gale Crater on Mars ever has offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.

More information about Curiosity is online at: http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ .

You can follow the mission on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .


Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

2013-072


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#2    pallidin

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 01:45 AM

Go Curiousity! Can't wait for some hopefully interesting findings in the years to come.






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