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Could a Comet Hit Mars in 2014? [merged x2]

mars comets impact comet c/2013 a1 comet siding spring

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#46    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 10:26 AM

Comet to Make Close Flyby of Red Planet in October 2014


www.nasa.gov said:

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This computer graphic depicts the orbit of comet 2013 A1 (Siding Spring) through the inner solar system. On Oct. 19, 2014, it is expected to pass within 186,000 miles (300,000 kilometers) of Mars. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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April 12, 2013 Update:

New observations of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) have allowed NASA's Near-Earth Object Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. to further refine the comet's orbit.

Based on data through April 7, 2013, the latest orbital plot places the comet's closest approach to Mars slightly closer than previous estimates, at about 68,000 miles (110,000 kilometers). At the same time, the new data set now significantly reduces the probability the comet will impact the Red Planet, from about 1 in 8,000 to about 1 in 120,000. The latest estimated time for close approach to Mars is about 11:51 a.m. PDT (18:51 UTC) on Oct. 19, 2014. At the time of closest approach, the comet will be on the sunward side of the planet.

Future observations of the comet are expected to refine the orbit further. The most up-to-date close-approach data can be found at: http://ssd.jpl.nasa....cad=1;rad=0#cad .



March 21, 2013 Update:

New observations of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) have allowed NASA's Near-Earth Object Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. to refine the comet's orbit.

Using observations through March 15, 2013, the latest orbital plot places the comet's closest approach to Mars a little farther out than previously estimated, at about 73,000 miles (118,000 kilometers) from the surface of the Red Planet. The impact probability has decreased accordingly; it is now about 1 in 8,000. The latest estimated time for close approach to Mars is about 11:45 a.m. PDT (18:45 UTC) on Oct. 19, 2014. At the time of closest approach, the comet will be on the sunward side of the planet. The comet and its tail should be a spectacular sight in the pre-dawn Martian sky just before closest approach, as well as in the post-dusk sky just after closest approach.

Future observations of the comet are expected to refine the orbit further. The most up-to-date close-approach data can be found at: http://ssd.jpl.nasa....cad=1;rad=0#cad .  

DC Agle 818-393-9011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

2013-081




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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#47    smokeycat

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 11:48 AM

Interesting. Thanks for the update.


#48    Frank Merton

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 11:49 AM

Aw, shucks.  Well, at least lucky for any Martians.


#49    Hazzard

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 06:51 AM

I wish it would hit the Red planet,... if for nothing else (the science) imagine the fireworks.

I still await the compelling Exhibit A.

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