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Computer Swap on Curiosity Rover [merged]

mars curiosity mars science laboratory rover nasa

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 11:13 AM

Computer Swap on Curiosity Rover


www.nasa.gov said:

This artist concept features NASA's<br />
Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity<br />
rover, a mobile robot for investigating<br />
Mars' past or present ability to<br />
sustain microbial life.<br />
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech    <br />
<a href='http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/gallery/pia14175.html' class='bbc_url' title='External link' rel='nofollow external'> Full image and caption</a>
This artist concept features NASA's
Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity
rover, a mobile robot for investigating
Mars' past or present ability to
sustain microbial life.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech    
Full image and caption
Mission Status Report

PASADENA, Calif. - The ground team for NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has switched the rover to a redundant onboard computer in response to a memory issue on the computer that had been active.

The intentional swap at about 2:30 a.m. PST today (Thursday, Feb. 28) put the rover, as anticipated, into a minimal-activity precautionary status called "safe mode." The team is shifting the rover from safe mode to operational status over the next few days and is troubleshooting the condition that affected operations yesterday. The condition is related to a glitch in flash memory linked to the other, now-inactive, computer.

"We switched computers to get to a standard state from which to begin restoring routine operations," said Richard Cook of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, project manager for the Mars Science Laboratory Project, which built and operates Curiosity.

Like many spacecraft, Curiosity carries a pair of redundant main computers in order to have a backup available if one fails. Each of the computers, A-side and B-side, also has other redundant subsystems linked to just that computer. Curiosity is now operating on its B-side, as it did during part of the flight from Earth to Mars. It operated on its A-side from before the August 2012 landing through Wednesday.

"While we are resuming operations on the B-side, we are also working to determine the best way to restore the A-side as a viable backup," said JPL engineer Magdy Bareh, leader of the mission's anomaly resolution team.

The spacecraft remained in communications at all scheduled communication windows on Wednesday, but it did not send recorded data, only current status information. The status information revealed that the computer had not switched to the usual daily "sleep" mode when planned. Diagnostic work in a testing simulation at JPL indicates the situation involved corrupted memory at an A-side memory location used for addressing memory files.

Scientific investigations by the rover were suspended Wednesday and today. Resumption of science investigations is anticipated within several days. This week, laboratory instruments inside the rover have been analyzing portions of the first sample of rock powder ever collected from the interior of a rock on Mars.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to assess whether areas inside Gale Crater ever offered a habitable environment for microbes. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

More information about Curiosity is online at http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ . You can follow the mission on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter at: http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .


Guy Webster 818-354-6278 818-393-9011/818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

2013-078


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#2    Merc14

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 02:43 AM

Apparently our baby, Curiosity, is having some corrupted flash memory problems so the team is switching to RCE B (Rover Compute Elements A and B) to try and fix the issue.   Remarkably, this is the first problem the rover has encountered and in reality it isn't a huge one but hope she fares well and the switch goes as well as everything else this wonderful machine has done.   RCE A could be up and running again so like new soon so back-up would be restored.

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#3    pallidin

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 02:48 AM

Hmmm... interesting. Thanks for sharing!


#4    coolguy

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 07:41 AM

Maybe aliens hacked the rover..






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