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Blast Waves from Russian Meteor Crossed US

meteors chelyabinsk pressure waves infrasound

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 02:11 PM

Incoming! Then Outgoing! Waves Generated by Russian Meteor Recorded Crossing the U.S.
Network of stations with seismometers and air pressure sensors detected the blast waves


The National Science Foundation said:

A network of seismographic stations recorded spectacular signals from the blast waves of the meteor that landed near Chelyabinsk, Russia, as the waves crossed the United States.

The National Science Foundation- (NSF) supported stations are used to study earthquakes and the Earth's deep interior.

While thousands of earthquakes around the globe are recorded by seismometers in these stations--part of the permanent Global Seismographic Network (GSN) and EarthScope's temporary Transportable Array (TA)--signals from large meteor impacts are far less common.

The meteor explosion near Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15, 2013, generated ground motions and air pressure waves in the atmosphere. The stations picked up the signals with seismometers and air pressure sensors

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 06 March 2013 - 02:11 PM.

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#2    TheLastLazyGun

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:19 PM

If the meteor had burned up in Earth's atmosphere on 15th February next year, instead of 15th February this year, it would have burned up in the skies over northern Ireland and northern England instead of Chelyabinsk, which is on the same latitude.

Edited by TheLastLazyGun, 06 March 2013 - 07:20 PM.


#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:36 PM

View PostTheLastLazyGun, on 06 March 2013 - 07:19 PM, said:

If the meteor had burned up in Earth's atmosphere on 15th February next year, instead of 15th February this year, it would have burned up in the skies over northern Ireland and northern England instead of Chelyabinsk, which is on the same latitude.

That would depend entirely on what time on that date it entered the atmosphere. Ten minutes makes a lot of difference on a planet that rotates at 1070 mph (at the equator).

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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