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Next gross human evolution


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#241    ReaperS_ParadoX

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 11:38 PM

View PostDieChecker, on 02 April 2013 - 07:31 PM, said:

That is an opinion. Science has shown over and over that our Current Modern bodies are not made for long term, strenuous running. Jogging is now discouraged in favor of non-impact gym/exercise machines. Running will give you bad ankles, knees and hips when you are in your 40s. Ancient humans did not live long enough to develop repetitive physical use injuries, so they had nothing to loose by running.

Sure, running has health benefits, but those same benefits can be gained by using a machine and not destroying your muscular-skeletal system. Not to say that a short jog is going to tear you to pieces, but it is not the Fountain of Youth that it was portrayed as in the 1980s.


So you believe that there will be no great leaps in technology for the next 500,000 years? Because you've said before that you are not talking about 500 or 5000 years, but more like 500,000 years.

As an employee at Intel, I know that computer technology advances so that the processing power doubles about every year and a half, which allows other technologies to near double in that same amount of time.

And, it has already been shown that direct brain to computer can be done in mice and rats in dozens of different kinds of experiments. I do beleive there already exist prototype human brain to computer devices for the handicapped.
http://en.wikipedia....puter_interface

So unless your finger evolution happens fast, direct brain control of technology will happen much, much, much, much sooner.


Sure there is... Many people from sub-saharan Africa have skin that is so dark brown as to be actually considered black.
Posted Image
That skin color looks more bluish to me

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#242    MR.Blueprint

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 12:30 AM

View PostCoffey, on 02 April 2013 - 06:22 PM, said:

That's wrong, our technological advancements with computers are trying to cut out the hands all together. We already have HCI's that use brain waves, bypassing the hands.




That's exactly what I was talking about with the pinky, it's pretty much just used for balance or balancing things in our hands.

thats the best point that we might create  advance technology
but i still think we will evolve an extra first i think we will always being using our fingers n
matter what

even with advance technology, we will still use our fingers and we will evolve a six finger and then we will evolve better brains and then we jus might conquer the universe which i still think we will find nothing


we are more likely to find another dimension before we find alien life

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#243    aquatus1

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 12:42 AM

You have a rather eclectic understanding of the field of evolution.  I do not recommend you use it in your thought exercises, as your examples of it break down quite rapidly, and attempting to support them with the fragmented system you believe describes evolution only undermines any genuine interest one might take in the exercise.


#244    Mangoze

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 09:52 AM

View PostRockabyeBillie, on 02 April 2013 - 06:06 PM, said:

So now you're going to try to argue with how often I use all of my fingers even though we've never even met in person and you have no idea what my hands look like?

I can tell you straight up that I do not use my pinky to pick up or hold things because it is too short and offers no additional support. When I do have to climb or lift myself I hold my frail little pinky out because I'm afraid of hurting it. Even right now as I speak my little pinkies are up as I do all of the typing with the rest of my fingers, and when I hold and move my mouse my pinkes are up so they don't get in the way.

We're not all built the same. Maybe your pinkies are useful, but mine don't do much for me. So don't try to tell me how I behave in an attempt to make your theory valid. You have NO idea.

Quote

The little finger is very important in a strong grip.
source

Quote

SO, WHAT IF YOU DIDN'T HAVE A PINKY FINGER?

"You'd lose 50 percent of your hand strength, easily,"

source

Edited by Mangoze, 03 April 2013 - 09:52 AM.


#245    Mangoze

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 10:04 AM

I managed to find a couple of videos of examples of fully functioning sixth-fingers.



https://www.youtube....h?v=_TnH8NQxu_A

What the advantage is, is not shown.


#246    Frank Merton

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 10:07 AM

I think our little fingers are useful; certainly mine is, but more of a good thing is not necessarily better.  That four fingers and an opposable thumb is probably optimal for holding and brachiating and carrying things is born out by the fact that this is universal among primates.


#247    Mangoze

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 10:13 AM

Quote

Is having 5 fingers a dominant trait?
...
Having more than five fingers is a little more complicated because it can be a dominant or recessive trait, depending on what genes are involved. If polydactyly is caused by just a single gene that only affects the number of fingers or toes and nothing else, then it is typically a dominant trait. If you have one “polydactyly” copy of any of these genes you get extra fingers even when the other copy says to make five fingers.

But polydactyly can also be one symptom of a larger syndrome. In these cases the syndrome (and the polydactyly that comes with it) is usually a recessive trait. Of course this means, in these cases, having five fingers is the dominant trait.
...
source

Why is the rate of polydactyly, more or less, constant?

Quote

...
Dominant But Rare
So why if there are many dominant versions of genes that make six fingers is having six fingers rare? Well, those versions of genes are rare. You don’t meet many people with extra fingers or toes.

This means when two people meet and have a baby, odds are neither has the “six-finger” copy of a gene. Since they both have the “five-finger” version, the baby will too.

This is the case for the vast majority of people.

In some regions polydactyly is more common though. Usually these are places where a founding member carried the gene for polydactyly and this person passed that on to his or her children. If there aren’t new people coming into the region the polydactyly trait is more common than in other regions.

House cats are a good example of this. Ernest Hemmingway owned a polydactyl cat, the descendents of which still live in the Hemmingway museum in Key West, Florida.

Since they are descendents from Hemmingway’s original cat and there are few new cats arriving in that region, almost half of the cats have extra toes.
...



Quote

Dominant vs. Recessive
...
As you've noticed, dominant does not mean common. Dominant just means that it'll win out over recessive.

How common a trait is has nothing to do with this. It depends on how many copies of that gene version are in a population.
...
source

Edited by Mangoze, 03 April 2013 - 10:18 AM.


#248    FlyingAngel

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 11:19 AM

Okay. But if there is any "mutated" human in our society, I'd call him/her/it freak => less chance to have a lover => less chance to breed. Dominant and advantage for survival? I don't think so.

The main problem here is "money". If you have good genes but has no money to buy food => die. But you have money, you don't need good or mutated gene to survive => you can breed.

And money can't be pass down through genes => humans stopped evolved

And unlike animals, you can only have one wife/husband (with the exception of some country)

Edited by FlyingAngel, 03 April 2013 - 11:21 AM.


#249    Mr.United_Nations

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 12:30 PM

Ok who gave this a 5 stars?


#250    RockabyeBillie

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 01:03 PM

View PostMangoze, on 03 April 2013 - 09:52 AM, said:


That's cool. But as I've already stated, mine are so short they serve little purpose for me. Just because you can find sources about how others' work, doesn't change the way mine function.

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#251    MR.Blueprint

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 09:24 PM

View PostMangoze, on 03 April 2013 - 10:04 AM, said:

I managed to find a couple of videos of examples of fully functioning sixth-fingers.



https://www.youtube....h?v=_TnH8NQxu_A

What the advantage is, is not shown.


#cool

this report pretty much summarize everything i been sayin wish i could end his thread with that video

and in each video hey said is pretty much un noticeable


and listen to the last thing the anchor says

Edited by MR.Blueprint, 03 April 2013 - 09:27 PM.

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#252    MR.Blueprint

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 01:34 AM

View PostMangoze, on 03 April 2013 - 10:13 AM, said:

source

Why is the rate of polydactyly, more or less, constant?





source


yea that did sound better than how i was saying it.


exactly it depend how many copies of that genes are in the pop...and according to the numbers is a good decent amount and it will only grow .



In some regions polydactyly is more common though. Usually these are places where a founding member carried the gene for polydactyly and this person passed that on to his or her children. If there aren’t new people coming into the region the polydactyly trait is more common than in other regions.

and thats why they are evolving fast because they are isolated in a way....

isolation make evolution speed up or somn like that

Edited by MR.Blueprint, 04 April 2013 - 01:38 AM.

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#253    omir29

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 02:39 AM

I disagree when you know a little about human anatomy and the use of our fingers you realize that probably we will lose the pinky finger in both hands and feet because they have no relative use.In our hands all the grabing and writing is done without it and in the case of the feet it doesn't help in anyway and losing it wouln't affect our balance or way of wlaking.


#254    MR.Blueprint

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 03:38 AM

View Postomir29, on 04 April 2013 - 02:39 AM, said:

I disagree when you know a little about human anatomy and the use of our fingers you realize that probably we will lose the pinky finger in both hands and feet because they have no relative use.In our hands all the grabing and writing is done without it and in the case of the feet it doesn't help in anyway and losing it wouln't affect our balance or way of wlaking.


we use our pinky more than you think


and we wont lose our toe.....evolution doesnt take away body part unless its in the way....the fact we wear shoes so much we be the reason we wont lose a toe nor gain one BUT the same genes that will trigger the finger might trigger for a six toe also

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#255    Rlyeh

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 05:50 AM

View PostMR.Blueprint, on 04 April 2013 - 03:38 AM, said:

and we wont lose our toe.....evolution doesnt take away body part unless its in the way....the fact we wear shoes so much we be the reason we wont lose a toe nor gain one BUT the same genes that will trigger the finger might trigger for a six toe also
You should really try to understand evolution before making crap up.





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