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Collecting Rainwater Is Now Illegal!


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#16    Kowalski

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 04:59 PM

View PostThe New Richard Nixon, on 29 April 2013 - 04:55 PM, said:


Why was he collecting rain water? how much? how long?

It's his property. Does he really need a reason?


#17    ouija ouija

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:01 PM

This is a joke ........ right?

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#18    Jackofalltrades

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:02 PM

View Postkrillen, on 29 April 2013 - 03:05 PM, said:

You may not be aware of this, but many Western states, including Utah, Washington and Colorado, have long outlawed individuals from collecting rainwater on their own properties because, according to officials, that rain belongs to someone else.


It is the Bolded underlined bit, that I cannot see how they work out who own's it, how can ANYONE own something that is natural

Seem's to me (and I may be far off) that it is not the actual rainwater they are trying to control, but the actual water supply itself,  if You are not allowed to collect rain water, then You have to go to some company to buy water



Quote

Four dollars for a gallon of gas is ridiculous enough, but $4 for a gallon of water could someday became a reality, that is if oil tycoons like T. Boone Pickens and water bottling companies have their way. Privatization of water in which companies control the public's water sources and free water is a thing of the past appears to be what Pickens and corporations such as Monsanto, Royal Dutch Shell, and Nestle are banking on to increase their vast fortunes.


Quote from this site

http://Four dollars ... vast fortunes.

Just one of many sites I have seen this or similiar stated on it


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#19    Leah G.

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:04 PM

Where do they think the water we drink everyday comes from??? Rain!!! Even lake water is from rain so if the rain is so polluted, so are we. Actually more like diluted... granted, rain off your roof might not be the best idea but it's safe to water your garden with....


#20    Sweetpumper

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:08 PM

View Postkrillen, on 29 April 2013 - 03:05 PM, said:

according to officials, that rain belongs to someone else.

"You didn't rain that!"

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#21    spud the mackem

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:13 PM

View PostWickian, on 29 April 2013 - 04:27 PM, said:

It's one of those laws designed to prevent a problem from starting.  Lets say the entire population of the U.S. got involved in a new trend to collect large amount of rainwater on every single piece of property(including farms, companies that wanted to sell bottled rainwater and other large pieces of land), that could have a very big impact on the environment if that much water never reached the ground.

Do any of these state laws have a limit on how much a private citizen can gather(per gallon), or are they complete bans?
  Hey Buddy,are you having a laugh ?...Any saved water will reach the ground through plants,humans,or animals eventually,unless you're gonna save it and turn it all into steam.

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#22    pallidin

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:14 PM

So, rainwater, in certain climate districts, provide a substantial, sometimes the ONLY, contribution to the sub-surface water needed for eventual use even many miles away.

OK, I guess that makes SOME sense.

I don't know, I'm a little confused. I hope that certified geologists or whatever are an integral part in the debate of the restrictions for a particular district.


#23    Child of Bast

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:27 PM

I don't see this becoming a wide spread issue. Around Santa Fe, NM all new housing built is required to have a catch basin. And Texas provides a sales tax exemption for those buying a system to capture rainwater. Oklahoma also has a program for water saving techniques and Ohio also allows people to capture rainwater for potable use.

So your "many" states amounts to three so far.

Edited by Kasey2601, 29 April 2013 - 05:29 PM.

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#24    Ashotep

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:30 PM

Do you ever get the feeling this is just another way to control what you do and has no other useful purpose.  I can't believe that many people collect so much rainwater it needs to be regulated.


#25    Ever Learning

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:45 PM

View Postaztek, on 29 April 2013 - 04:15 PM, said:

what dangers?? ppl have been doing it for thousands of years, we have not noticed any dangers.
i assume uncovered rain water collection can make you ill and urban living has made the populace ignorant of that which is common sense to people who dont get theirs readily out of the tap. its best to drink running water from a spring or secondly a river and boiling water before using kills germs. common sense to those who were taught, im sure a permit insures they have been taught and that they wont ignorantly supply masses of water to the unknowing.
you can also use limestone to purify water

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#26    green_dude777

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:05 PM

View Postpallidin, on 29 April 2013 - 05:14 PM, said:

So, rainwater, in certain climate districts, provide a substantial, sometimes the ONLY, contribution to the sub-surface water needed for eventual use even many miles away.

OK, I guess that makes SOME sense.

I don't know, I'm a little confused. I hope that certified geologists or whatever are an integral part in the debate of the restrictions for a particular district.

I hope so too, unfortunately I doubt it.  The scientists used are probably on a companies' payroll.  The company who is paying the scientists more than likely have something to gain by supporting this law.

As noted above, there's a battle for freshwater coming.


#27    Kowalski

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:24 PM

View PostArmchair Educated, on 29 April 2013 - 05:45 PM, said:

i assume uncovered rain water collection can make you ill and urban living has made the populace ignorant of that which is common sense to people who dont get theirs readily out of the tap. its best to drink running water from a spring or secondly a river and boiling water before using kills germs. common sense to those who were taught, im sure a permit insures they have been taught and that they wont ignorantly supply masses of water to the unknowing.
you can also use limestone to purify water

I see what you are saying. But, if you collect rainwater for watering your garden or plants, I don't see how that is "dangerous". Also, for drinking the water, just boil it, and filter it through a Berkeley Filter or something similar. Check out: http://rainwaterharv...du/in-home-use/

The above website has many manuals and documents explaining how to collect rainwater and use it safely. No classes or permits or money required.

I'm sorry, but the government has no right to tell people what to do with RAIN water on their own property.


#28    questionmark

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:37 PM

View PostKowalski, on 29 April 2013 - 06:24 PM, said:

I see what you are saying. But, if you collect rainwater for watering your garden or plants, I don't see how that is "dangerous". Also, for drinking the water, just boil it, and filter it through a Berkeley Filter or something similar. Check out: http://rainwaterharv...du/in-home-use/

The above website has many manuals and documents explaining how to collect rainwater and use it safely. No classes or permits or money required.

I'm sorry, but the government has no right to tell people what to do with RAIN water on their own property.

Besides, real tea can only be cooked with soft rainwater.

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#29    questionmark

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:41 PM

On a second thought, if the rain water belongs to somebody else we should bring a class action against said individual for not avoiding that it swamps our gardens.

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#30    MonkeysWorth

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:59 PM

this is one of the most idiotic things i have heard in yrs, rain water collected from downspouts, roofs, does not compare to roads, empty fields, empty lots, tree farms, driveways, sidewalks, parking lots, gardens, trees, lakes, rivers, oceans, creeks, ponds, state parks, highways, toll roads, freeways, front and back yards, rain that hits sides of buildings, trees etc that runs down to the ground, i could go on...... not everyone in a neighborhood collects rainwater, one rooftop will not cause a drought, even 100,000 will not cause a drought....  Rain falling on my property will do as laws of gravity does, go straight down the path of least resistance and will not move 3 miles over to a farmers crops which needs water.... WTH?? Rain falling on my roof, then collected will not affect anything at all. on a side note, there are states, municipalities that have made rainfall from your property taxable, reason is, it goes into the public drainage system....  either way, the government will get your hard earned money. and these are the lawmakers the public votes for.....  you want this to stop, change the public, or change the lawmakers... only way water can be wasted is if you remove it from the planet... its all recycled from your bladder to rain to steam to clouds to lakes, oceans, snow, ice............ idiotic......





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