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Collecting Rainwater Is Now Illegal!


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#46    Rafterman

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 01:38 PM

View PostWickian, on 29 April 2013 - 04:27 PM, said:

It's one of those laws designed to prevent a problem from starting.  Lets say the entire population of the U.S. got involved in a new trend to collect large amount of rainwater on every single piece of property(including farms, companies that wanted to sell bottled rainwater and other large pieces of land), that could have a very big impact on the environment if that much water never reached the ground.

Do any of these state laws have a limit on how much a private citizen can gather(per gallon), or are they complete bans?

But yet other parts of the country are taxing, fining, and probably imprisoning people for allowing rainwater runoff from their property.

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#47    aztek

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 03:12 PM

if it is about tax money,there has to be a way to get permit, it might cost you, but hey, that is how the world works, it ain't fare.

or just make sure no one knows you collect water, and have tanks hidden, and keep your mouth shut about it.

we can all protest,. complain, but good luck adjusting the world to your standarts, adjusting yourself to the present world, is a lot mot effective, and productive.
if you insist, become politician, and change laws, but i'm 200% sure, once you get into that "industry" you will be one of them doing the same thing you came to change in a first place.

Edited by aztek, 30 April 2013 - 03:12 PM.

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#48    minera

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:05 PM

View Postaztek, on 29 April 2013 - 04:15 PM, said:

what dangers?? ppl have been doing it for thousands of years, we have not noticed any dangers.
The dangers are probably we would find out what sorts of chemicals and poisons they put in the atmosphere and contaminate the rain water. I would get the rainwater analyzed.  Also if that rain water belongs to 'someone else' who exactly is that person and why is HIS/HER rainwater on YOUR property? And how would they control where rain falls etc. ? The politicians are idiots and should be made to sit in chains in the town square wearing dunce hats!!!!


#49    HerNibs

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:19 PM

This is an older article but it explains WHY the law exists.

Quote

But according to the state of Colorado, the rain that falls on Holstrom's property is not hers to keep. It should be allowed to fall to the ground and flow unimpeded into surrounding creeks and streams, the law states, to become the property of farmers, ranchers, developers and water agencies that have bought the rights to those waterways.
What Holstrom does is called rainwater harvesting. It's a practice that dates back to the dawn of civilization, and is increasingly in vogue among environmentalists and others who pursue sustainable lifestyles. They collect varying amounts of water, depending on the rainfall and the vessels they collect it in. The only risk involved is losing it to evaporation. Or running afoul of Western states' water laws.

Those laws, some of them more than a century old, have governed the development of the region since pioneer days.

"If you try to collect rainwater, well, that water really belongs to someone else," said Doug Kemper, executive director of the Colorado Water Congress. "We get into a very detailed accounting on every little drop."

Frank Jaeger of the Parker Water and Sanitation District, on the arid foothills south of Denver, sees water harvesting as an insidious attempt to take water from entities that have paid dearly for the resource.

"Every drop of water that comes down keeps the ground wet and helps the flow of the river," Jaeger said. He scoffs at arguments that harvesters like Holstrom only take a few drops from rivers. "Everything always starts with one little bite at a time."

Increasingly, however, states are trying to make the practice more welcome. Bills in Colorado and Utah, two states that have limited harvesting over the years, would adjust their laws to allow it in certain scenarios, over the protest of people like Jaeger.

Organic farmers and urban dreamers aren't the only people pushing to legalize water harvesting. Developer Harold Smethills wants to build more than 10,000 homes southwest of Denver that would be supplied by giant cisterns that capture the rain that falls on the 3,200-acre subdivision. He supports the change in Colorado law.

"We believe there is something to rainwater harvesting," Smethills said. "We believe it makes economic sense."

Collected rainwater is generally considered "gray water," or water that is not reliably pure enough to drink but can be used to water yards, flush toilets and power heaters. In some states, developers try to include a network of cisterns and catchment pools in every subdivision, but in others, those who catch the rain tend to do so covertly.

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#50    aztek

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:59 PM

View Postminera, on 30 April 2013 - 04:05 PM, said:

The dangers are probably we would find out what sorts of chemicals and poisons they put in the atmosphere and contaminate the rain water. I would get the rainwater analyzed.  Also if that rain water belongs to 'someone else' who exactly is that person and why is HIS/HER rainwater on YOUR property? And how would they control where rain falls etc. ? The politicians are idiots and should be made to sit in chains in the town square wearing dunce hats!!!!
i disagree about dangers, but the rest, i agree 100%.

if someone owns it, than he should be liable for any damage rainwater does.

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#51    spud the mackem

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:22 PM

These people who issue fines will think of all kinds of devious ways to get money from the unsuspecting  Joe Public, but the Traffic Warden scum are still top of the heap.

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#52    MissMelsWell

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 03:41 AM

I don't think it's illegal to collect rain water in my city and I live in Washington.... all my neighbors have rain barrels just like the ones shown in the picture. They use the water to wash their cars, water flowersbeds, grass and gardens. It rains here ALL the time. and the only water being collected it what's running off the roof. We have PLENTY to spare. We have way more than we need actually. No one is drinking it or bathing in it to the best of my knowledge. In fact we're CHARGED by the city for rain run off and it's based on how large the lot is. As far as we're concerned... we paid for that rain water through the rain run off tax.. it's OURS to do with as we like.

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