Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Mystery of Irish Potato Famine Solved


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#16    Ealdwita

Ealdwita

    Hwt oredmcg

  • Member
  • 5,275 posts
  • Joined:08 Jun 2010
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 May 2013 - 11:48 PM

View Postspud the mackem, on 24 May 2013 - 10:51 PM, said:

To be sure,I'm saying nothing,but the craics good so it is.Slainte.

You're soooo subtle, spud!

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#17    spud the mackem

spud the mackem

    Spud the Mackem

  • Member
  • 4,166 posts
  • Joined:28 Oct 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yeo Valley,Darkest Somerset.

  • man who ask for nothing shall never be disappointed

Posted 25 May 2013 - 03:55 PM

The Potato famine split up many a good family, a lot of mine went to America,and some to England,(and the ones that were caught to Botany Bay).

(1) try your best, ............if that dont work.
(2) try your second best, ........if that dont work
(3) give up you aint gonna win

#18    Ealdwita

Ealdwita

    Hwt oredmcg

  • Member
  • 5,275 posts
  • Joined:08 Jun 2010
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 May 2013 - 05:28 PM

View Postspud the mackem, on 25 May 2013 - 03:55 PM, said:

The Potato famine split up many a good family, a lot of mine went to America,and some to England,(and the ones that were caught to Botany Bay).

Here's one that got nabbed.........



(One of the best versions I've heard of this song)

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#19    zebra99

zebra99

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 330 posts
  • Joined:02 May 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United Kingdom

Posted 25 May 2013 - 09:16 PM

Many years ago I read that grain stocks in England could have been allocated to alleviate the famine but they were witheld
thanks to some Lord or other and his cronies in government.

So there you have it....the same unfeeling filthy rich politicians making crap decisions just like we have today.Nothing changes.

Posted Image

#20    Kowalski

Kowalski

    The Original Penguin Conspiracy Theorist

  • Member
  • 4,102 posts
  • Joined:14 Mar 2013
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:* Madgascar *

  • It's All Some Kind Of Wacked Out Conspiracy....

Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:16 PM

View Postzebra99, on 25 May 2013 - 09:16 PM, said:

Many years ago I read that grain stocks in England could have been allocated to alleviate the famine but they were witheld
thanks to some Lord or other and his cronies in government.

So there you have it....the same unfeeling filthy rich politicians making crap decisions just like we have today.Nothing changes.

That's actually true, unfortunately. Also:


Quote

Sir Charles Trevelyan, who was in charge of the administration of Government relief to the victims of the Irish Famine, limited the Government's actual relief because he thought "the judgement of God sent the calamity to teach the Irish a lesson"

Quote


Records show Irish lands exported food even during the worst years of the Famine. When Ireland had experienced a famine in 1782–1783, ports were closed to keep Irish-grown food in Ireland to feed the Irish. Local food prices promptly dropped. Merchants lobbied against the export ban, but government in the 1780s overrode their protests. No such export ban happened in the 1840s.[65]
Cecil Woodham-Smith, an authority on the Irish Famine, wrote in The Great Hunger: Ireland 1845-1849 that no issue has provoked so much anger and embittered relations between England and Ireland as "the indisputable fact that huge quantities of food were exported from Ireland to England throughout the period when the people of Ireland were dying of starvation." Ireland remained a net exporter of food throughout most of the five-year famine.[fn 4]
Christine Kinealy writes that Irish exports of calves, livestock (except pigs), bacon and ham actually increased during the famine. The food was shipped under guard from the most famine-stricken parts of Ireland. However, the poor had no money to buy food and the government then did not ban exports

Quote

According to Peter Gray, in his book The Irish Famine, the government spent £7,000,000 for relief in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, "representing less than half of one percent of the British gross national product over five years. Contemporaries noted the sharp contrast with the 20 million pounds compensation given to West Indian slave-owners in the 1830s."


Quote

According to legend, in 1845, Ottoman Sultan Abdülmecid declared his intention to send £10,000 to Irish farmers, but Queen Victoria requested that the Sultan send only £1,000, because she herself had sent only £2,000. The Sultan is supposed to have sent the £1,000 along with three ships full of food. According to Abdullah Aymaz in an article in The Fountain magazine, the British administration tried to block the ships, but the food arrived secretly at Drogheda harbour and was left there by Ottoman sailors.[74][75] Shipping records relating to the port appear not to have survived. Newspaper reports suggest that ships from Thessaloniki in the Ottoman Empire sailed up the River Boyne in May 1847,[76] although it has also been claimed that the river was dry at the time. A letter in the Ottoman archives of Turkey, written by Irish notables explicitly thanks the Sultan for his help


Quote

In 1847, midway through the Great Irish Famine (1845–1849), a group of Native American Choctaws collected $710 (although many articles say the original amount was $170 after a misprint in Angie Debo's The Rise and Fall of the Choctaw Republic) and sent it to help starving Irish men, women and children. "It had been just 16 years since the Choctaw people had experienced the Trail of Tears, and they had faced starvation... It was an amazing gesture." according to Judy Allen, editor of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's newspaper, Biskinik, based at the Oklahoma Choctaw tribal headquarters in Durant, Oklahoma. To mark the 150th anniversary, eight Irish people retraced the Trail of Tears,[78] and the donation was publicly commemorated by President Mary Robinson.


Taken from http://en.wikipedia....amine_(Ireland)





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users