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Curiosity Radiation Data

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 08:19 PM

Data from NASA Rover's Voyage to Mars Aids Planning


www.nasa.gov said:

PASADENA, Calif. -- Measurements taken by NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission as it delivered the Curiosity rover to Mars in 2012 are providing NASA the information it needs to design systems to protect human explorers from radiation exposure on deep-space expeditions in the future.

Curiosity's Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is the first instrument to measure the radiation environment during a Mars cruise mission from inside a spacecraft that is similar to potential human exploration spacecraft. The findings reduce uncertainty about the effectiveness of radiation shielding and provide vital information to space mission designers who will need to build in protection for spacecraft occupants in the future.    

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#2    seeder

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:35 AM

And another source casts some doubt on manned missions, (Ive always thought this about the forthcoming Mars One trip where some volunteers will go on a one way journey for life)

Rover radiation data poses manned Mars mission dilemma.

Nasa's Curiosity rover has confirmed what everyone has long suspected - that astronauts on a Mars mission would get a big dose of damaging radiation.

The robot counted the number of high-energy space particles striking it on its eight-month journey to the planet.  Based on this data, scientists say a human travelling to and from Mars could well be exposed to a radiation dose that breached current safety limits.

This calculation does not even include time spent on the planet's surface. When the time devoted to exploring the world is taken into account, the dose rises further still.

This would increase the chances of developing a fatal cancer beyond what is presently deemed acceptable for a career astronaut.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-22718672

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#3    Esoteric Toad

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:58 PM

Radiation poses risk to Mars astronauts

And the CAPTAIN OBVIOUS title goes to the headline of this story.

Edited by Esoteric Toad, 31 May 2013 - 04:00 PM.


#4    SurgeTechnologies

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 05:24 PM

Some foods pose risks, as banks, politicans, diseases, viruses, man itself, yet we are here... so dont let little radiation pose any risk at all... Those guys from ISS have all came back alive and kickin'...


#5    pallidin

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 07:52 PM

Having read the article, I would tend to agree that the threat posed by what amounts to be truly not all that great, is significantly less than the potential threat posed by the mission itself(i.e spacecraft failure)

Regarding the ISS, I thought that its alltitude(some 230 miles or so) is well within the protective magnetic field of the earth. Don't get me wrong, I'm sure there is a slight increase, as even being in a jet exposes one to a slight increase in radiation, though less than interplanetary space.


#6    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 09:08 PM

View PostEsoteric Toad, on 31 May 2013 - 03:58 PM, said:

And the CAPTAIN OBVIOUS title goes to the headline of this story.

Really! You do realise that we are al bathed in various types of radiation every day but it generally poses NO threat to us.

The type, level and length of exposure all make a difference. So, there is NOTHING obvious about the title if you actually have even a small understanding of the radiation threat.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 31 May 2013 - 09:08 PM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#7    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 09:15 PM

View PostTesla II, on 31 May 2013 - 05:24 PM, said:

Some foods pose risks, as banks, politicans, diseases, viruses, man itself, yet we are here...
Which is relevant how?

View PostTesla II, on 31 May 2013 - 05:24 PM, said:

so dont let little radiation pose any risk at all...
I think that your understanding of the concept of risk is about the same as your understanding of radiation... none at all. It is not a matter of "letting" a "little" radiation pose a threat, we have no choice in the matter. The radiation IS at a level which poses a threat and we can't change that. Ignoring it won't make it go away.

View PostTesla II, on 31 May 2013 - 05:24 PM, said:

Those guys from ISS have all came back alive and kickin'...
Yes but they don't venture into deep space, they remain with in the protection of the Van Allen radiation belts. A trip to Mars will involve astronauts spending months outside of this protection. Your argument is rather like saying, "I survive having a bath several times a week so the middle of the Pacific Ocean should present no problem".

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#8    ali smack

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 11:17 AM

I am not sure why anyone would even want to go to Mars.
Due to the risks.


#9    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 11:27 AM

View Postali smack, on 01 June 2013 - 11:17 AM, said:

I am not sure why anyone would even want to go to Mars.
Due to the risks.
Why would people want to go to the moon, or the bottom of the ocean, or the top of Everest?

It is because they ARE risks. Challenges to be met and conquered. It is part of human nature. It is the reason we are not confined to the plains of Africa, why we no longer live in caves. It is why we can fly in aircraft or drive in cars.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 01 June 2013 - 11:27 AM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#10    GirlfromOz

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 12:03 PM

Let's all fly to Mars & have a fun time!Of coarse we are going to lose contact with Earth & NASA! Oh,but don't let that worry you! Of coarse Earth & the Mars mission will lose contact. When the **** hits the fan,of coarse earth will lose contact with you!And,of coarse,the Mars mission riders will die on a lonely lifeless planet.Let's just be positive here!The best outcome is that you are going to die on your way to Mars or you are going to die,without help from NASA,when you get there!

Edited by GirlfromOz, 01 June 2013 - 12:18 PM.






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