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NSA Requests ALL Phone Records From Verizon


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#211    Babe Ruth

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 07:55 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 21 June 2013 - 02:39 PM, said:

Whether or not all this is within the Fourth Amendment is still being adjudicated.  My prediction is the government will win with just a few rules imposed.

There is always a posible conflict of interest between employees and owners of any business, and that includes bureaucrats and citizens of a nation.  The general presumption, however, is that in the end everyone's best interests are preserved.  I see nothing wrong in government "spying" on citizens such as criminals, terrorists, corporate cheats, and so on.  Even a policeman walking down the street noting what is going on can be deemed "spying" if you are paranoid enough.

It's a tradeoff between having effecting governance and anarchy.

Being adjudicated by whom, Frank?

It is disheartening, but somehow not surprising, to have a Vietnamese come down on the side of the government, instead of down on the side of the individual and the rule of law.

Authoritarianism and statism thrive in Vietnam, it appears.


#212    Detective Mystery 2014

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 02:36 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 21 June 2013 - 02:39 PM, said:

Whether or not all this is within the Fourth Amendment is still being adjudicated.  My prediction is the government will win with just a few rules imposed.

There is always a posible conflict of interest between employees and owners of any business, and that includes bureaucrats and citizens of a nation.  The general presumption, however, is that in the end everyone's best interests are preserved.  I see nothing wrong in government "spying" on citizens such as criminals, terrorists, corporate cheats, and so on.  Even a policeman walking down the street noting what is going on can be deemed "spying" if you are paranoid enough.

It's a tradeoff between having effecting governance and anarchy.

The government need not violate the Fourth Amendment to stop anarchy. Enforcing existing constitutional laws is fine.

There is one reality with billions of versions.

#213    regeneratia

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:41 PM

Ah, now things are moving the right direction:



Related Issues




NSA Spying
Google petitions FISA court for ability to disclose NSA user-data requests on First Amendment basis




"Other companies should follow suit," the Electronic Frontier Foundation said in a Twitter post Tuesday afternoon. But other companies' reaction was muted. A source at one Internet company suggested that a lawsuit might be cumbersome and slow down the disclosure process.
https://www.eff.org/...first-amendment

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#214    regeneratia

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:46 PM

View PostDetective Mystery 2013, on 22 June 2013 - 02:36 AM, said:

The government need not violate the Fourth Amendment to stop anarchy. Enforcing existing constitutional laws is fine.

It is a pretty impossible expectation when your law enforcement officals are breaking the law and doing things that are unConstitutional.

FBI broke law for years in phone record searches
By John Solomon and Carrie Johnson
Special to The Washington Post and Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, January 19, 2010
http://www.washingto...0011803982.html

http://addon.100sear...nconstitutional


Truth is such a rare quality, a stranger so seldom met in this civilization of fraud, that it is never received freely, but must fight its way into the world
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#215    danielost

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:49 PM

They are using the fbi, a department of the government, to investagate the irs, the nsa, and the department of justes.  Can you say massive coverup.

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#216    Detective Mystery 2014

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:56 AM

View Postregeneratia, on 24 June 2013 - 08:46 PM, said:

It is a pretty impossible expectation when your law enforcement officals are breaking the law and doing things that are unConstitutional.

I live in hope. There still are good guys in high places. Most employees and spies, in the alphabet agencies, are patriots. We just have to worry about a minority of rogues.

There is one reality with billions of versions.

#217    regeneratia

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 01:49 AM

View PostDetective Mystery 2013, on 25 June 2013 - 12:56 AM, said:

I live in hope. There still are good guys in high places. Most employees and spies, in the alphabet agencies, are patriots. We just have to worry about a minority of rogues.

It sure seems like the rogues rule.

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#218    danielost

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 02:40 AM

The rogues are the ones in charge.  The irs just finished investagateing itself.  It found it had done nothing wrong.

I am a Mormon.  If I don't use Mormons believe, those my beliefs only.
I do not go to church haven't for thirty years.
There are other Mormons on this site. So if I have misspoken about the beliefs. I welcome their input.
I am not perfect and never will be. I do strive to be true to myself. I do my best to stay true to the Mormon faith. Thanks for caring and if you don't peace be with you.

#219    Detective Mystery 2014

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 02:16 AM

View Postregeneratia, on 25 June 2013 - 01:49 AM, said:

It sure seems like the rogues rule.

The bad guys get all the press. It doesn't help that they might have blackmailed some of the good guys.

There is one reality with billions of versions.

#220    regeneratia

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 12:13 PM

View PostDetective Mystery 2013, on 26 June 2013 - 02:16 AM, said:

The bad guys get all the press. It doesn't help that they might have blackmailed some of the good guys.

I am learning these days that there is evil in the good guys and good in the bad ones.
==========

http://consortiumnew...ackmail-scheme/
Bush’s Foiled NSA Blackmail Scheme


June 21, 2013
---
I always called it the Coalition of the sWilling.

Edited by regeneratia, 27 June 2013 - 12:15 PM.

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#221    regeneratia

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 08:48 PM

Public release date: 28-Jun-2013, php, http://www.eurekaler...t-lws062713.php

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Low-power Wi-Fi signal tracks movement -- even behind walls

'Wi-Vi' is based on a concept similar to radar and sonar imaging

CAMBRIDGE, MA -- The comic-book hero Superman uses his X-ray vision to spot bad guys lurking behind walls and other objects. Now we could all have X-ray vision, thanks to researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.
Researchers have long attempted to build a device capable of seeing people through walls. However, previous efforts to develop such a system have involved the use of expensive and bulky radar technology that uses a part of the electromagnetic spectrum only available to the military.
Now a system being developed by Dina Katabi, a professor in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and her graduate student Fadel Adib, could give all of us the ability to spot people in different rooms using low-cost Wi-Fi technology. "We wanted to create a device that is low-power, portable and simple enough for anyone to use, to give people the ability to see through walls and closed doors," Katabi says.
The system, called "Wi-Vi," is based on a concept similar to radar and sonar imaging. But in contrast to radar and sonar, it transmits a low-power Wi-Fi signal and uses its reflections to track moving humans. It can do so even if the humans are in closed rooms or hiding behind a wall.
As a Wi-Fi signal is transmitted at a wall, a portion of the signal penetrates through it, reflecting off any humans on the other side. However, only a tiny fraction of the signal makes it through to the other room, with the rest being reflected by the wall, or by other objects. "So we had to come up with a technology that could cancel out all these other reflections, and keep only those from the moving human body," Katabi says.
Motion detector
To do this, the system uses two transmit antennas and a single receiver. The two antennas transmit almost identical signals, except that the signal from the second receiver is the inverse of the first. As a result, the two signals interfere with each other in such a way as to cancel each other out. Since any static objects that the signals hit — including the wall — create identical reflections, they too are cancelled out by this nulling effect.
In this way, only those reflections that change between the two signals, such as those from a moving object, arrive back at the receiver, Adib says. "So, if the person moves behind the wall, all reflections from static objects are cancelled out, and the only thing registered by the device is the moving human."
Once the system has cancelled out all of the reflections from static objects, it can then concentrate on tracking the person as he or she moves around the room. Most previous attempts to track moving targets through walls have done so using an array of spaced antennas, which each capture the signal reflected off a person moving through the environment. But this would be too expensive and bulky for use in a handheld device.
So instead Wi-Vi uses just one receiver. As the person moves through the room, his or her distance from the receiver changes, meaning the time it takes for the reflected signal to make its way back to the receiver changes too. The system then uses this information to calculate where the person is at any one time.
Possible uses in disaster recovery, personal safety, gaming
Wi-Vi, being presented at the Sigcomm conference in Hong Kong in August, could be used to help search-and-rescue teams to find survivors trapped in rubble after an earthquake, say, or to allow police officers to identify the number and movement of criminals within a building to avoid walking into an ambush.
It could also be used as a personal safety device, Katabi says: "If you are walking at night and you have the feeling that someone is following you, then you could use it to check if there is someone behind the fence or behind a corner."
The device can also detect gestures or movements by a person standing behind a wall, such as a wave of the arm, Katabi says. This would allow it to be used as a gesture-based interface for controlling lighting or appliances within the home, such as turning off the lights in another room with a wave of the arm.
Unlike today's interactive gaming devices, where users must stay in front of the console and its camera at all times, users could still interact with the system while in another room, for example. This could open up the possibility of more complex and interesting games, Katabi says.

###

Written by Helen Knight, MIT News Office

Truth is such a rare quality, a stranger so seldom met in this civilization of fraud, that it is never received freely, but must fight its way into the world
Professor Hilton Hotema
(quote from THE BIBLE FRAUD)

Robert Heinlein: SECRECY IS THE HALLMARK OF TYRANNY!

#222    Kowalski

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 09:11 PM

View Postregeneratia, on 29 June 2013 - 08:48 PM, said:

Public release date: 28-Jun-2013, php, http://www.eurekaler...t-lws062713.php

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Low-power Wi-Fi signal tracks movement -- even behind walls

'Wi-Vi' is based on a concept similar to radar and sonar imaging

CAMBRIDGE, MA -- The comic-book hero Superman uses his X-ray vision to spot bad guys lurking behind walls and other objects. Now we could all have X-ray vision, thanks to researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.
Researchers have long attempted to build a device capable of seeing people through walls. However, previous efforts to develop such a system have involved the use of expensive and bulky radar technology that uses a part of the electromagnetic spectrum only available to the military.
Now a system being developed by Dina Katabi, a professor in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and her graduate student Fadel Adib, could give all of us the ability to spot people in different rooms using low-cost Wi-Fi technology. "We wanted to create a device that is low-power, portable and simple enough for anyone to use, to give people the ability to see through walls and closed doors," Katabi says.
The system, called "Wi-Vi," is based on a concept similar to radar and sonar imaging. But in contrast to radar and sonar, it transmits a low-power Wi-Fi signal and uses its reflections to track moving humans. It can do so even if the humans are in closed rooms or hiding behind a wall.
As a Wi-Fi signal is transmitted at a wall, a portion of the signal penetrates through it, reflecting off any humans on the other side. However, only a tiny fraction of the signal makes it through to the other room, with the rest being reflected by the wall, or by other objects. "So we had to come up with a technology that could cancel out all these other reflections, and keep only those from the moving human body," Katabi says.
Motion detector
To do this, the system uses two transmit antennas and a single receiver. The two antennas transmit almost identical signals, except that the signal from the second receiver is the inverse of the first. As a result, the two signals interfere with each other in such a way as to cancel each other out. Since any static objects that the signals hit — including the wall — create identical reflections, they too are cancelled out by this nulling effect.
In this way, only those reflections that change between the two signals, such as those from a moving object, arrive back at the receiver, Adib says. "So, if the person moves behind the wall, all reflections from static objects are cancelled out, and the only thing registered by the device is the moving human."
Once the system has cancelled out all of the reflections from static objects, it can then concentrate on tracking the person as he or she moves around the room. Most previous attempts to track moving targets through walls have done so using an array of spaced antennas, which each capture the signal reflected off a person moving through the environment. But this would be too expensive and bulky for use in a handheld device.
So instead Wi-Vi uses just one receiver. As the person moves through the room, his or her distance from the receiver changes, meaning the time it takes for the reflected signal to make its way back to the receiver changes too. The system then uses this information to calculate where the person is at any one time.
Possible uses in disaster recovery, personal safety, gaming
Wi-Vi, being presented at the Sigcomm conference in Hong Kong in August, could be used to help search-and-rescue teams to find survivors trapped in rubble after an earthquake, say, or to allow police officers to identify the number and movement of criminals within a building to avoid walking into an ambush.
It could also be used as a personal safety device, Katabi says: "If you are walking at night and you have the feeling that someone is following you, then you could use it to check if there is someone behind the fence or behind a corner."
The device can also detect gestures or movements by a person standing behind a wall, such as a wave of the arm, Katabi says. This would allow it to be used as a gesture-based interface for controlling lighting or appliances within the home, such as turning off the lights in another room with a wave of the arm.
Unlike today's interactive gaming devices, where users must stay in front of the console and its camera at all times, users could still interact with the system while in another room, for example. This could open up the possibility of more complex and interesting games, Katabi says.

###

Written by Helen Knight, MIT News Office

I've heard about this before. Pretty scary stuff.
I don't understand why they need all this information....it's definitely not to catch terrorists.....


#223    regeneratia

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 09:12 PM

View PostKowalski, on 29 June 2013 - 09:11 PM, said:

I've heard about this before. Pretty scary stuff.
I don't understand why they need all this information....it's definitely not to catch terrorists.....

OUr government is getting way, way out of hand. Heinlein said that if a government requires more than one building, it is way too big.

Truth is such a rare quality, a stranger so seldom met in this civilization of fraud, that it is never received freely, but must fight its way into the world
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(quote from THE BIBLE FRAUD)

Robert Heinlein: SECRECY IS THE HALLMARK OF TYRANNY!

#224    Jessica Christ

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 10:46 PM

View Postregeneratia, on 29 June 2013 - 09:12 PM, said:

OUr government is getting way, way out of hand. Heinlein said that if a government requires more than one building, it is way too big.

Isn't he a science fiction author?


#225    Kowalski

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 11:27 PM

View PostThe world needs you, on 29 June 2013 - 10:46 PM, said:

Isn't he a science fiction author?

So?





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