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A face on an ancient Native grinding stone


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#1    herenow

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 01:26 PM

This is a photo of an ancient Native People's grinding stone in the woods in Massachusetts.
The stone is about the size of a small couch and has been used for thousands of years to grind maize, nuts and medicines.
I took the photo a couple years ago, and just saw this face on it.

Posted Image


#2    Rafterman

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 01:45 PM

Do you have any evidence that it's an Indian grinding stone?

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#3    herenow

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 01:51 PM

View PostRafterman, on 08 June 2013 - 01:45 PM, said:

Do you have any evidence that it's an Indian grinding stone?

Archeologists and local historians say it is.

Edited by herenow, 08 June 2013 - 01:51 PM.


#4    Rlyeh

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 03:07 PM

I just found two other faces!

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#5    herenow

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 01:37 AM

Damn!


#6    xFelix

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 03:38 AM

Maybe you should forward your findings to your local archaeologists and historians, would be cool to have the rock named after you too wouldn't it?

My posts consist of my opinions, beliefs, and experiences, feel free to disagree in a respectful manner.

I have a right to my beleifs, just as you have a right to not agree with them.

So long as we respect each other's beliefs, we won't have a single problem.


#7    Rlyeh

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:23 AM

Or look up what Pareidolia is.


#8    xFelix

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 07:54 AM

View PostRlyeh, on 09 June 2013 - 06:23 AM, said:

Or look up what Pareidolia is.
Do your eyes and my eyes seeing faces on a rock have to be some sort of a problem with the way we perceive things? There is no chance that these patterns are intentional at all? Have indigenous people ever carved drawings into stone, or are we just seeing patterns because our minds played tricks on us?

My posts consist of my opinions, beliefs, and experiences, feel free to disagree in a respectful manner.

I have a right to my beleifs, just as you have a right to not agree with them.

So long as we respect each other's beliefs, we won't have a single problem.


#9    Rlyeh

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 08:02 AM

View PostxFelix, on 09 June 2013 - 07:54 AM, said:

Do your eyes and my eyes seeing faces on a rock have to be some sort of a problem with the way we perceive things? There is no chance that these patterns are intentional at all? Have indigenous people ever carved drawings into stone, or are we just seeing patterns because our minds played tricks on us?
If a logical fallacy is your best argument, you've got more problems than just perception.


#10    xFelix

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 08:32 AM

View PostRlyeh, on 09 June 2013 - 08:02 AM, said:

If a logical fallacy is your best argument, you've got more problems than just perception.
Argument? I wasn't arguing a single thing, just giving another possible option to the OP while reinforcing your option.

As far as 'fallacy' goes, please do explain what you define as such...

My posts consist of my opinions, beliefs, and experiences, feel free to disagree in a respectful manner.

I have a right to my beleifs, just as you have a right to not agree with them.

So long as we respect each other's beliefs, we won't have a single problem.


#11    Rlyeh

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 09:47 AM

View PostxFelix, on 09 June 2013 - 08:32 AM, said:

Argument? I wasn't arguing a single thing, just giving another possible option to the OP while reinforcing your option.
So you weren't presenting an argument for the possibility of faces on rocks?

Quote

As far as 'fallacy' goes, please do explain what you define as such...
Indigenous people carve rocks, therefore any resemblance to a face must have been carved by indigenous people.
Do you see a problem with this logic?


#12    herenow

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 11:46 AM

View PostRlyeh, on 09 June 2013 - 09:47 AM, said:


Indigenous people carve rocks, therefore any resemblance to a face must have been carved by indigenous people.
Do you see a problem with this logic?

This is where I was kind of going with this. I think I found a petroglyph.


#13    Rafterman

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 01:45 PM

View Postherenow, on 08 June 2013 - 01:51 PM, said:

Archeologists and local historians say it is.

Do you have any links supporting this claim?  There are literally millions of rocks just like through all throughout New England.  Is it in the middle of what was a village at one point?

If this one particular stone had been identified and proven to be an Indian grinding stone, that would indicate that it had been studied by researchers, correct?  Wouldn't they have found this face?

Edited by Rafterman, 09 June 2013 - 01:47 PM.

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#14    herenow

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 02:45 PM

View PostRafterman, on 09 June 2013 - 01:45 PM, said:

Do you have any links supporting this claim?  There are literally millions of rocks just like through all throughout New England.  Is it in the middle of what was a village at one point?

If this one particular stone had been identified and proven to be an Indian grinding stone, that would indicate that it had been studied by researchers, correct?  Wouldn't they have found this face?

I have written documentation from the 1950s but I don't think there is anything online.
I’ve visited this stone for 20 years and had not noticed the face.  There’s a lot of ancient energy in this area, and some ceremonial stone piles as well.  The stone is maybe 20 yards off an old trail which connected native villages.

I just happened to be looking at a 2 year old photo of the stone when I saw it recently.  I’ve gone out there again and moss is growing over that section of the stone.


#15    DKO

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 03:11 PM

View Postherenow, on 09 June 2013 - 02:45 PM, said:

I have written documentation from the 1950s but I don't think there is anything online.
I’ve visited this stone for 20 years and had not noticed the face.  There’s a lot of ancient energy in this area, and some ceremonial stone piles as well.  The stone is maybe 20 yards off an old trail which connected native villages.

I just happened to be looking at a 2 year old photo of the stone when I saw it recently.  I’ve gone out there again and moss is growing over that section of the stone.

Let's just say for arguments sake it is a Native American grinding stone. Wouldn't the archaeologists notice it first?

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