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debarking a dog.


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#31    libstaK

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 01:22 AM

View Postdanielost, on 22 June 2013 - 11:25 PM, said:

What I have learned from watching "my cat from hell" and the british dog whisperer, is that in most cases it is the owners fualt their pet is acting out.  Shock and chock collers are short cuts, and so is having them killed.  People who are to lazy to train their pets, shouldn't have them.
I think that may be true for 90% of cases but I also think that like humans, there will be pets who have chemical imbalances in the brain or suffer from some form of psychosis.  I know there are treatments for some of these but they are still rare enough that the options are not huge or guaranteed to solve the problem for every instance.  I wouldn't automatically blame the owner but I would be checking off all the boxes and making sure they do all they can if it were someone I know before deciding on collars or debarking and definitely there should never be a reason for putting them down.

"I warn you, whoever you are, oh you who wish to probe the arcanes of nature, if you do not find within yourself that which you seek, neither shall you find it outside.
If you ignore the excellencies of your own house, how do you intend to find other excellencies?
In you is hidden the treasure of treasures, Oh man, know thyself and you shall know the Universe and the Gods."

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#32    RavenEyes19

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 08:27 AM

View PostMissMelsWell, on 22 June 2013 - 09:50 AM, said:

I have a friend whose cat is declawed. I can assure you that cat is in no pain. She's an indoor cat and never goes outside.
I've heard declawing is banned in many European countries and for good reason. Your friend's cat might not be in pain now, but it probably experienced pain after the procedure.  It would be like cutting the fingers off on a human and it's completely unnecessary. I think most cat owners who declaw are either lazy or ignorant about how painful it is and about the psychological effects it may have on a cat. My parents had two of our cats declawed when I was young and they didn't know any better. It was a huge mistake. Both cats became territorial, urinated all over the house and completely ruined the carpet. Every other cat I've owned has had no problems using the litterboxes. I've heard that declawed cats are more likely to develop behavioral issues and are more likely to stop using the litterbox. My current cat is declawed (I didn't have her declawed, she was abandoned by her previous owners) and she gets litter stuck in her paws.
I've never had a problem with my cats destroying furniture. I have cat posts set up throughout the house and I give them plenty of play time so they do not get restless and tear things up. There are alternatives to declawing like cutting the cat's nails short or using claw covers.


#33    Frank Merton

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 08:37 AM

Every animal one has, has its own unique personality.  This is part of the joy of having them around.  Some need to be taught what to claw and what not to, some know automatically.

Dogs play a useful role in the house of alerting a house when there is an intruder, and for this it needs to be taught to only bark at strangers and only when they approach the house.  This takes a little time but is well worth it.  Our present female dog seems to teach this to her puppies, so people appreciate it when we give them one.

We have a cat who talks constantly.  She use to drive me crazy.  She seems unable to allow silence, but must always make comments and observations.  It was a stroke of luck, but she lost most of her voice (we think from overuse) and now has the sweetest barely hearable meow.  It still continues incessantly but at least it is tolerable.


#34    libstaK

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:15 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 23 June 2013 - 08:37 AM, said:

Every animal one has, has its own unique personality.  This is part of the joy of having them around.  Some need to be taught what to claw and what not to, some know automatically.

Dogs play a useful role in the house of alerting a house when there is an intruder, and for this it needs to be taught to only bark at strangers and only when they approach the house.  This takes a little time but is well worth it.  Our present female dog seems to teach this to her puppies, so people appreciate it when we give them one.

We have a cat who talks constantly.  She use to drive me crazy.  She seems unable to allow silence, but must always make comments and observations.  It was a stroke of luck, but she lost most of her voice (we think from overuse) and now has the sweetest barely hearable meow.  It still continues incessantly but at least it is tolerable.
Lol, one of my cats is just like that - a total chatter box, she would put any incessantly barking dog to shame.  Mind you, I find it totally cute and she keeps human hours aka: she sleeps when I do, so together with my finely tuned selective hearing it's all good.

"I warn you, whoever you are, oh you who wish to probe the arcanes of nature, if you do not find within yourself that which you seek, neither shall you find it outside.
If you ignore the excellencies of your own house, how do you intend to find other excellencies?
In you is hidden the treasure of treasures, Oh man, know thyself and you shall know the Universe and the Gods."

Inscription - Temple of Delphi

#35    danielost

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:37 AM

A couple of years ago or so, a zoo (I forget where) got a pair of penguins.  In a week all ofe the penguins were eating and swimming in sequince.  The new penguins were circus penguins.

I am a mormon.  If I don't use mormons believe, those my beliefs only.
I do not go to church haven't for thirty years.
There are other mormons on this site. So if I have misspoken about the beliefs. I welcome their input.
I am not perfect and never will be. I do strive to be true to myself. I do my best to stay true to the mormon faith. Thank for careing and if you don't peace be with you.

#36    danielost

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:41 AM

View PostlibstaK, on 23 June 2013 - 01:22 AM, said:


I think that may be true for 90% of cases but I also think that like humans, there will be pets who have chemical imbalances in the brain or suffer from some form of psychosis.  I know there are treatments for some of these but they are still rare enough that the options are not huge or guaranteed to solve the problem for every instance.  I wouldn't automatically blame the owner but I would be checking off all the boxes and making sure they do all they can if it were someone I know before deciding on collars or debarking and definitely there should never be a reason for putting them down.

If your pet as a pychosis problem, I would think that the collars would make thingsd worse.  If it has a chemical in balance, I know first hand that such resorts make it worse.

I am a mormon.  If I don't use mormons believe, those my beliefs only.
I do not go to church haven't for thirty years.
There are other mormons on this site. So if I have misspoken about the beliefs. I welcome their input.
I am not perfect and never will be. I do strive to be true to myself. I do my best to stay true to the mormon faith. Thank for careing and if you don't peace be with you.

#37    libstaK

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:48 AM

View Postdanielost, on 23 June 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

If your pet as a pychosis problem, I would think that the collars would make thingsd worse.  If it has a chemical in balance, I know first hand that such resorts make it worse.
If it was the last box on the list to be ticked, I would still try it before looking at surgical options - I would give it a chance just in case in other words.  Of course, I would rather be lucky enough to be in a tolerant neighbourhood that didn't require me to have to take any drastic action at all but not everyone gets that option and psychotic or chemically imbalanced dogs are not always either treatable or effectively trainable.

"I warn you, whoever you are, oh you who wish to probe the arcanes of nature, if you do not find within yourself that which you seek, neither shall you find it outside.
If you ignore the excellencies of your own house, how do you intend to find other excellencies?
In you is hidden the treasure of treasures, Oh man, know thyself and you shall know the Universe and the Gods."

Inscription - Temple of Delphi




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