Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


* * * * * 1 votes

Real-life Tatooine could host life


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1    Saru

Saru

    Site Webmaster

  • 20,080 posts
  • Joined:06 Mar 2001
  • Gender:Male

  • "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious." - Albert Einstein

Posted 17 June 2013 - 10:48 AM

Distant solar systems with more than one star could be good places to look for habitable worlds.

Yahoo! News said:

Luke Skywalker would be proud. Planets like Skywalker's fictional home of Tatooine in the "Star Wars" movie series might have more potential for habitability than planets in other systems, research suggests.

Posted Image Read more...



#2    krypter3

krypter3

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 420 posts
  • Joined:10 Feb 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia

  • “My spelling is Wobbly. It's good spelling but it Wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places.” A.A Milne

Posted 17 June 2013 - 12:20 PM

These are not the droids you are looking for.


#3    Junior Chubb

Junior Chubb

    There has been an awakening

  • Member
  • 5,271 posts
  • Joined:28 Nov 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

  • I am Junior Chubb, son of the Chubb, father of Chubb III

Posted 17 June 2013 - 12:48 PM

if there's a bright center to the universe, you're on the planet that it's farthest from...

Great article to read, even though Tatooines 'twin suns' are actually our sun and moon.

Edited by Junior Chubb, 17 June 2013 - 12:49 PM.

I've flown from one side of this galaxy to the other. I've seen a lot of strange stuff, but I've never seen anything to show me where the hell Helen of Annoy has been for the past couple of months.

#4    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 14,397 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • fmerton.blogspot.com

Posted 17 June 2013 - 01:10 PM

I can picture some astronomer on Tattooine saying, "Don't expect life on the earth.  Its sun is solitary so it would get too much solar radiation"


#5    marcos anthony toledo

marcos anthony toledo

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 223 posts
  • Joined:09 Aug 2009

Posted 17 June 2013 - 02:57 PM

Finding life in this galaxy is becoming more possible with each new extra solar study.


#6    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 14,397 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • fmerton.blogspot.com

Posted 17 June 2013 - 03:24 PM

View Postmarcos anthony toledo, on 17 June 2013 - 02:57 PM, said:

Finding life in this galaxy is becoming more possible with each new extra solar study.
It's hard to be more possible than possible, and that is about what it is.  There are probably somewhere between a million and a billion planets and moons that in theory could harbor life, which is what we could say about Venus, the Moon, Mars, Europa, Titan, and maybe a few others in our system, in addition of course to the earth.

Unfortunately, or maybe fortunately, the ability to have life on them is but one uncertainty we have to consider.  Other uncertainties are the chances of life evolving, the chances of life surviving several billion years, the chances of it evolving into complex forms, the chances of it evolving sentience, the chances of it evolving consciousness, the chances of it developing advanced technology, the chances of it not destroying itself, and the chances of it not finding another universe.

If any of those, even one, has a value approaching zero, then the product will be close to zero.  That's arithmetic.


#7    sam_comm

sam_comm

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,006 posts
  • Joined:02 Jun 2013
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 17 June 2013 - 04:38 PM

Interesting discoveries because with the number of binar systems in our galaxy the odds of finding life are greater. Now we have a confirmation that various conditions and not only those of the Earth are suited for life.


#8    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 18,694 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 17 June 2013 - 08:10 PM

And to think that just a couple years ago, the experts were saying not to even bother looking for planets in binary system, because they probably would not form there.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#9    krypter3

krypter3

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 420 posts
  • Joined:10 Feb 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia

  • “My spelling is Wobbly. It's good spelling but it Wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places.” A.A Milne

Posted 17 June 2013 - 10:30 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 17 June 2013 - 03:24 PM, said:

It's hard to be more possible than possible, and that is about what it is.  There are probably somewhere between a million and a billion planets and moons that in theory could harbor life, which is what we could say about Venus, the Moon, Mars, Europa, Titan, and maybe a few others in our system, in addition of course to the earth.

Unfortunately, or maybe fortunately, the ability to have life on them is but one uncertainty we have to consider.  Other uncertainties are the chances of life evolving, the chances of life surviving several billion years, the chances of it evolving into complex forms, the chances of it evolving sentience, the chances of it evolving consciousness, the chances of it developing advanced technology, the chances of it not destroying itself, and the chances of it not finding another universe.

If any of those, even one, has a value approaching zero, then the product will be close to zero.  That's arithmetic.

Life could be rare, but even if only one planet out of a trillion have life, there's still millions to billions of planets that have life.  Thinking we are the only life in the universe is like thinking we are the centre of the universe.  It's that human need to feel unique, I have no doubt some people believe we are alone and that gives them great pleasure.  That we are the only sentient species.  I honestly think it would just be an awful waste of space and monumentally boring if we are the only life out here.


#10    spud the mackem

spud the mackem

    Spud the Mackem

  • Member
  • 3,587 posts
  • Joined:28 Oct 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yeo Valley,Darkest Somerset.

  • man who ask for nothing shall never be disappointed

Posted 17 June 2013 - 11:09 PM

We are one of a million or more species on this planet,some of which have been here a lot longer than us,and a lot can survive in extreme heat or cold that would kill us,so why do we think we may be alone in the universe,there could also be other life forms not based on carbon,we cannot be alone,but cannot at the moment prove it,but one day ?????

(1) try your best, ............if that dont work.
(2) try your second best, ........if that dont work
(3) give up you aint gonna win

#11    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 18,694 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 18 June 2013 - 12:26 AM

I think dolphins were just recognized as a sentient species in India.... So, we're not alone anyway...
http://www.unexplain...pic=248584&st=0


#12    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,178 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 19 June 2013 - 11:11 AM

View Postkrypter3, on 17 June 2013 - 10:30 PM, said:

I honestly think it would just be an awful waste of space and monumentally boring if we are the only life out here.

The universe does not care about what humans think is boring or a waste. It is what it is.

Quote

The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.
Neil deGrasse Tyson


Whether we are alone or part of a universe teaming with life is not a result of human desire or sentiment, hope or fears, it is a result of the laws of nature.

Quote

Human judges can show mercy. But against the laws of nature, there is no appeal.
Arthur C. Clarke

To quote Sir Arthur again:

Quote

Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying.
Arthur C. Clarke

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#13    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 14,397 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • fmerton.blogspot.com

Posted 19 June 2013 - 11:39 AM

While it seems impossible that we are the only life out there, there are reasons to think we may be the only intelligent, sentient, technological life we are likely to ever encounter.  Indeed, I remember seeing estimates that there might be only one occurrence of us in the entire observable space.

I'm not so sure that is a boring prospect.  Think of all the worlds we will have no moral qualms colonizing.  On the other hand, if life is common, these worlds may well be off limits for both biological (mutual poisoning) and ethical (cutting off potential evolution) reasons.


#14    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 18,694 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:06 PM

Even if Earth is the only life right now. It will spread. Even if life has to wait till a gigantic asteroid hits the Earth and fragments with microorganisms go flinging out and it takes a million or a billion years for one to fall on another world, life will spread.

Whenever we send a man made device out into space, it is a chance for life to spread.

If planets are as common as is being infered these days, and if we can assume that a star would attract intersteller debris, then we can assume that eventually most big bits of matter will fall onto a planet and eventually some of those microorganisms will catch hold somewhere. The odds are long, but the time to do it is even longer.

Modern estimates are that the Milky Way galaxy is about 14 billion years old. And estimates are that star formation will continue for 10^16 years. Or another way of looking at it is that the Milky Way Galaxy has been around for 1/500,000th of its lifespan so far. That is a LOT of time. It is almost the same ratio as one hour in the life of a person that lives to be 100 years old. The entire life of the galaxy so far is only the first hour after a baby has been born.

Edited by DieChecker, 19 June 2013 - 10:08 PM.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users